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Connecticut River: citizens taking a stand to end Northfield Mountain’s half century of killing

Posted by on 02 Apr 2022 | Tagged as: America's best landscaped sewer, Clean Water Act, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Day of Mourning, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FirstLight Power, Greenfield Recorder, Julie Crocker, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Mark Tisa, Martin Suuberg, migratory fish, Mr. Mark S. Tisa, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, New Hampshire, no license to kill, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, PSP Investments, The Recorder, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, US Supreme Court, USFWS, Vermont, Vermont Digger, VT Digger, Waterkeeper Alliance, Wendi Weber, wrsi.com


The giant sucking intake mouth of FirstLight/PSP Investment’s Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, where it preys on the aquatic life of the Connecticut in three New England states.Photo Copyright © 2022 by Karl Meyer

Things to understand about the current extended (expired April 30, 2018) and proposed FirstLight federal license for Northfield Mountain operations:

* Under commonly occurring conditions, its suction and pumping will continue to force more than 5 miles of the river to flow backwards.

* Northfield Mountain’s daily use will continue to obliterate 100s of millions of fish and aquatic animals annually.

* It’s suction and subsequent regurgitation of a deadened river at over 15,000 cubic feet per second, and 20,000 cubic feet per second respectively, for hours on end, is roughly the equivalent of swallowing all the aquatic life in the 4-story, 19,000 sq. ft. Hawkes and Reed building in Greenfield–one EVERY second, SIXTY every minute, THREE THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED per hour…

The turbines of the pump station suck in life and throw out death,” Shayla Freeland, Gill MA.

The gross megawatts it squanders yearly sucking the river backward could directly power the annual needs of cities and towns up and down this Valley. Instead it will suck out a river’s soul.”
Karl Meyer, Greenfield MA, from the Greenfield Recorder and vtdigger.org.

A There is NO WATCHDOG HERE: interview on THE RIVER ahead of the Connecticut River Day of Mourning.
https://wrsi.com/monte/mourning-the-connecticut-river/

Those seeking a true watchdog model with commitment, staff lawyers and enforcement intent might do well to investigate the Riverkeeper/Waterkeeper organization.

UNDERSTAND: there is no new signed license yet. Only the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission can issue one. FERC itself must ensure that any new license must comply with all existing US environmental laws. This machine does not; and cannot meet those requirements.

The US Supreme Courts decision in 1872 in Holyoke Co. v. Lyman confirmed there must be safe upstream and downstream passage of migratory fish on all US rivers. Canadian-parent owned FirstLight’s proposal fails this.

A river flowing backwards does not meet the standards of the Clean Water Act. You cannot license such impact on a US river.
Northfield Mountain, Northfield MA, where the Connecticut River ecosystem dies… Photo Copyright © 2022, by Karl Meyer

FirstLight’s proposed temporary and flimsy barrier “net” will not even be anchored in the riverbed, and will leave eggs, fish and young of three states exposed to Northfield’s massive suction in their most fragile months of development.

There is nothing in the plan to monitor it daily, below the surface, where the killing occurs. The see-sawing pressure from Northfield and natural river storm flows will very likely leaving it loose and flopping in the current–just as the old net for factory-produced baby salmon did for a quarter century, beginning back in the 1980s. It’s a red herring.

In short, if relicensed, the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, will continue to kill and erase a living Connecticut River ecosystem in Massachusetts daily. It’s uses has been illegal from the day it opened in 1972, a CENTURY after Holyoke Co. v Lyman.

* *GO ON THE RECORD WITH FERC: tell them “no new license to kill.” Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

Then go public, letters, op eds, papers… tell US Fish & Wildlife Service’s Wendi Weber, MA Fish & Wildlife’s Mark Tisa, National Marine Fisheries Julie Crocker, and MA DEP’s Martin Suuberg that
the Connecticut River will not be left to die here in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts… It’s THE PUBLIC’s RIVER.

NO RIVER SHOULD DIE IN THE DARK!

THE GREAT FAILURE TO PROTECT

Posted by on 22 May 2021 | Tagged as: Cabot Woods, Clean Water Act, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Endangered Species Act, Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, ESA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chairman, FERC Commissioner Richard Glick, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, Julie Crocker, Kathleen Theoharides, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection, Monte Belmonte, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Nipmuck, NMFS, Norwottuck, P-1889, P-2485, Pocumtuck, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, Section 9–Prohibition of Take Section 9(a)(1), Shortnose Stout, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, State of Delaware, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey, Wendi Weber, wrsi.com

THE GREAT FAILURE TO PROTECT: Flaunting the Endangered Species Act and Other federal and state laws governing clean water and habitat on the Connecticut River at Rock Dam in Massachusetts


Photo credit: US Geological Service

FirstLight’s Turners Falls and Cabot Station under the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission License #: FERC P-1889.

The ROCK DAM spawning nursery on the Connecticut River: the ONLY documented NATURAL spawning site for the ONLY FEDERALLY-ENDANGERED MIGRATORY FISH on the Connecticut River: the CONNECTICUT RIVER SHORTNOSE STURGEON.


Desiccating and baking shortnose sturgeon nursery habitat in the Connecticut River at the Rock Dam pool on May 21, 2021.
Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The FEDERAL ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, Section 9: the term “TAKE” MAKES IT ILLEGAL TO: “to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect, or to attempt to engage in any such conduct.”

Other federal and state laws NOT being ENFORCED on the Connecticut River at this critical habitat: the CLEAN WATER ACT, THE WETLANDS PROTECTION ACT, and, the Supreme Court’s 1872 landmark environmental decision for the Connecticut River in Holyoke Company v. Lyman—mandating that private operators of dams and facilities on the Connecticut—and thence for all rivers, must provide safe upstream and downstream passage for migratory fish.

A red slurry enters the Connecticut at the Rock Dam

Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

When there is no WATCHDOG, there is no ENFORCEMENT.

THE: federal and state agencies and leaders responsible for implementation, protection and enforcement of laws and conditions protecting spawning, habitat, life-cycle and survival of the Connecticut River’s sole federal and state endangered migratory fish: THE CONNECTICUT RIVER SHORTNOSE STURGEON

THEIR NAMES:

Phil Glick, Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission:
Julie Crocker: Branch Chief, Endangered Fish Recovery unit, NOAA, Gloucester MA (
Kathleen Theoharides: Sec. of MA Energy & Environmental Affairs
Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection
Ron Amidon: Commissioner MA Dept. of Fish & Game
Daniel McKiernan: Director MA Division of Marine Fisheries
Wendi Weber: Director Region 5, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Here is a link to further discussion of testing the connection between the TF Canal and grim sludge at Rock Dam–w/Monte Belmonte, WRSI.com
https://wrsi.com/monte/how-to-save-the-shortnose-sturgeon/

When there is no WATCHDOG, there is no ENFORCEMENT.

The Connecticut River at Earth Day 2021

Posted by on 22 Apr 2021 | Tagged as: Connecticut River ecosystem, Earth Day 2021, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, vtdigger.org, wrsi.com

Below are links to a podcast and recent op eds that appeared in the Recorder, Gazette, and VTdigger.org. The podcast is also an invite to this Saturday’s Great Walk for River Survival, through the French King Gorge.

Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

https://wrsi.com/monte/an-earth-week-walk-for-river-justice-surival/

https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-meyer-EarthDayAndARiver-LicenseToKill-40056122#lg=1&slide=0

https://www.gazettenet.com/Guest-columnist-Karl-Meyer-40061119

https://vtdigger.org/2021/04/18/karl-meyer-why-renew-a-federal-license-to-continue-killing-a-river/

The first picture above was taken at the Rock Dam in Turners Falls, showing the failing Connecticut River banks there on 4/21/2021–which slough down into the Rock Dam pool, the only documented natural spawning site for the federally endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon. The second photo from this Earth Day Eve, below, shows several people walking along the exposed cobbles of that habitat, just 150 feet from the orange puss running from those banks. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

This last picture looks down toward the suction tunnels on the River at Northfield on September 6, 2010.

Photo Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

The huge apparatus shown there heading out into the river constitutes the massive dredging operation FirstLight was ordered to undertake by the EPA after dumping thousands of tons of silt and muck directly into the river for over 90 straight days. Northfield created its own instant disaster, and it remained sanctioned and inoperable for over half a year. Shad passage on our quieted ecosystem at Turners Falls Dam jumped 800% over the previous decade’s average, and the power grid held together just fine
without Northfield Mountain’s deadly, fish-crushing, daily suck-and-surge regime.