Wendi Weber

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Connecticut River secret licensing talks: CITIZENS GOING ON THE RECORD FOR A RAVAGED ECOSYSTEM’S FUTURE

Posted by on 13 Dec 2021 | Tagged as: Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, E-Comments, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FERC licensing process, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, Greenfield Recorder, Julie Crocker, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Massachusetts DEP, Mr. Jesse Leddick, Mr. Mark S. Tisa, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, NOAA Fisheries Regional Administrator, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, Relicensing, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Steven Mattocks, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Wendi Weber

CONNECTICUT RIVER FINAL SECRET RELICENSING MEETINGS:CITIZENS GOING ON THE RECORD FOR A RAVAGED ECOSYSTEM’S FUTURE

Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

As the closed-door “final” bargaining between FirstLight and government agencies continues this month, more people are going on the record against a new half century of massive annual fish kills, gluttonous power consumption, and rampant ecosystem disruption at the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station. Read further below for new citizen FERC filings and Letters to the Editor highlighting their opposition to issuing a new license for this deadly cash cow.

MA Fish & Wildlife:

HAPPY to manufacture hatchery fish; WRETCHED at protecting the Connecticut River’s ancient migratory fish runs. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

THERE IS STILL TIME TO GO ON THE RECORD with others who are standing up for a living river!!!

Do you have children, or grandchildren? Or maybe you just understand that licensing a foreign-owned venture capital firm to have virtual control over 23 miles of the Connecticut River for the next 50 years closes off any hint of a participatory democracy for the future generations that will rely on this ecosystem to sustain them. They are looking to us for protection…

The secret dealings with our participating public trust agencies including MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife, US Fish & Wildlife Service and the MA Department of Environmental Protection are yet to be signed or sanctioned. The agencies will be passing proposals and juicy cash baits incentives back and forth through the end of the month… What’s your price for an ecosystem?

Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

Sending message to FERC, and the media, and your public representatives and agency leaders is the participatory democracy antidote to all the darkness. It takes just a few paragraphs and sends the critical message to leaders: you don’t get to sell off our River’s future. Stand up, stand out, and be heard. HERE’S HOW:

Simply write your remarks in a short document, and include the key FERC project number for Northfield Mountain: P-2485. You can send that letter to your representatives, agency leaders, the media—and lastly, importantly, to FERC to be entered into the public record. GO TO:

www.ferc.gov; then to Documents and Filings; then click on the Quick Links tab for FERC Online on the right; and then go to eComment on the page that opens. Follow the directions for Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number), use P-2485, and you are part of the public record.

Below are two recent on-the-record entries, to FERC, and the Greenfield Recorder.

Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

Document Accession #: 20211213-5000 Filed Date: 12/13/2021

David B. Keith, Deerfield, MA.
Our local newspaper, The Greenfield Recorder, reported (12/8/21) that a company had agreed to a $1.5 million settlement for a chemical spill leading to the deaths of more than 270,000 fish in a tributary to the Deerfield River, itself a tributary to the Connecticut River.

I am encouraged to see a value put on the fish in the tributary. I cannot, however, understand why one company is (quite rightly) being punished for killing fish in a tributary while another, FirstLight Utilities through its Northfield Mountain Pumped Hydro Storage facility, stands to be very handsomely rewarded for knowingly and persistently grinding up countless fish, including rare species, from the much larger Connecticut River. Please do not grant FirstLight Hydro Generating Company a fifty-year license to deprive us daily of a resource that was just valued at $1.5 million per incident.

And this:

I strongly urge rejection of the application by FirstLight MA Hydro LLC to operate Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage on the Connecticut River in Massachusetts. The pumping station causes an untold number of deaths to aquatic life in the river and extreme disruption of the the river’s natural flow. The natural flows necessary for the life cycles of vertebrates and invertebrates are utterly disrupted, fish and other life forms are shredded going up through the pumps, the flow of the river is reversed during pumping and shallow areas and banks are washed out and eroded as water is later released. No realistic way of preventing this death and disruption exists, even if FirstLight intended to attempt such safeguards.

Firstlight has proven to be a bad neighbor with regard to these abuses and has a record for making false statements with regard to their operation. Furthermore, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage uses more energy than it creates with its turbines, something that makes no sense in this time of Climate Crisis when energy must be both conserved and non harmful. FirstLight’s license for further operation must be rejected.

Don Ogden
The Envirom Show
WXOJ/WMCB/WMNB
140 Pine Street
Florence, MA 01062

CONSENSUS BUILDS AGAINST RELICENSING NORTHFIELD MTN: YOU CAN STILL BE HEARD!!!

Posted by on 06 Dec 2021 | Tagged as: Andrew Tittler, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, E-Comments, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FERC Secretary Kimberly D. Bose, FirstLight Power, Greenfield Recorder, Julie Crocker, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, Mr. Jesse Leddick, Mr. Mark S. Tisa, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, PSP Investments, public trust, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Daily Hampshire Gazette, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Wendi Weber


GREENFIELD MA. November 30, 5:58 am: River protector Dave Dersham of Northampton MA sets out on a 20 mile hike from Greenfield to deliver a “No License to Kill” message to the US Fish & Wildlife Service at their Hadley HQ. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

YOU CAN STILL BE HEARD!!!!!

*BE PART OF THE “SAVE OUR RIVER” HOLIDAY CAMPAIGN: READ BELOW!*

Public demonstrations, public comments to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and opinion pieces in the media all point to a gelling opposition to any FERC relicensing of FirstLight’s Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station. The coalescing opinions cite Northfield’s lethal impact on fish, it’s massive river-reversing ecosystem destruction–plus the profit motives of its Canadian venture capital owners. (* *See the 3 new public comment letters posted by FERC today, 12/06/2021, at the end of this message.)

Last Thursday, December 2, FirstLight gathered behind closed doors with the US Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Department of Environmental Protection and American Whitewater in what the Canadian-owned company termed “final” settlement negotiations. There was no daylight for the public to bear witness, and no way to know how far they reached toward a final signing agreement on relicensing this disaster or ending heart-stopping ecosystem flow reversals and inhalation of 100s of millions of fish.


RECEPTION at USFWS HQ, Hadley MA, November 30, 4 pm. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

What’s certain is the big horse-trading was on the table–with our public trust agencies holding our cards in the form of standing up for long-established environmental law and the ecosystem defense that future generations are counting on. Our River, our Refuge, OUR FISH!

Well it ain’t over till it’s over folks! Certainly there are issues not yet fully vetted, emails being exchanged, and last minute changes in the works from the agencies and FirstLight/PSP Investments’ big lawyers.

IN SHORT, nothing has been signed yet!

There remains time to get your comments in to the media, your public trust federal/state agency representatives (emails below), to FERC (address below), and cc’ed to your representatives—all of which are impactful.

HERE IS WHY: in FirstLight’s own words & schedule, filed with FERC November 12, 2021.

“FirstLight MA Hydro LLC submits request for FERC to delay issuance of Ready for Environmental Assessment Notice under P-1889, et al.”

AND, word-for-word, FirstLight’s Timeline to FERC:

“December 2021/January 2022 – parties schedule meeting or meetings of combined groups (fish/flows and recreation/cultural) to discuss overlapping issues. Parties provide status update to the Commission no later than December 31, 2021.

January 2022 – parties work toward achieving a conceptual agreement that can be filed with the Commission on or about January 31, 2022.”


At US Fish & Wildlife HQ, Hadley MA. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

WHICH is to note FirstLight’s sending the settlement outline “to the Commission no later than DECEMBER 31, 2021.”

THUS, if you make your public statement NOW–ahead of when everyone heads home for the holiday break, you can impact this secret, looming train wreck and help make a difference for future generations. Northfield Mountain has been a half century long disaster. You have the information. Short, concise comments—-to the media, cc’ed to your public trust agency officials, and sent as comments to FERC is what matters NOW. There are 3 new public comments shared below.

Directly below are the federal and state department heads and the public trust officials with long-term seats at the negotiating table:

wendi_weber@fws.gov, Director Region 5 US Fish & Wildlife Service; andrew.tittler@sol.doi.gov, lead council at the table for USFWS; melissa_grader@fws.gov, at the table for our migratory fish; julie.crocker@noaa.gov, National Marine Fisheries Service Endangered Fish Recovery Branch Chief (endangered sturgeon); william.mcdavitt@noaa.gov, at the table for our migratory fish; mark.tisa@state.ma.us, Director of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, jesse.leddick@state.ma.us, Chief of Regulatory Review MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife.

SEND them your Letter; forward it to the MEDIA for the public record—and…

THEN, file it with FERC for the OFFICIAL LICENSE RECORD.
Here’s the final step: TO FERC:

Go to www.ferc.gov . Go to Documents and Filings, or simply find the “file E-Comment” link if you see it. Once there, make sure you have this official number for Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, and USE IT. “P-2485.” In E-Comment you are filing comments under Hydro, in the Washington DC office, c/o FERC Secretary Kimberly D. Boles–and that FERC Project number, again is P-2485. Write in your comments and then hit send. DONE!

THIS ONE IS NEW TODAY! Followed by the 3 filed over the weekend:

Document Accession #: 20211207-5027 Filed Date: 12/07/2021

Mike Cournyn, Sudbury, MA.
Please reject the application for this license. It is hard to express how wrong this system is on so many levels. It is even harder to try and justify usefulness. More power is USED than is CREATED. The death and disruption of the ecosystem for a few dollars profit. I am amazed it was even allowed inthe first place. Please do the right thing.

Document Accession #: 20211206-5059 Filed Date: 12/06/2021

Malcolm G Everett, NORTHAMPTON, MA.
I am writing to express my deep concern about the impact of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Facility on the ecosystem of the Connecticut River. I believe the damage this system causes to species native to the river justifies the non-renewal of its license to operate. I understand it is viewed as a way to meet peak electricity demand, but I think there are better
ways being developed to solve this problem without causing damage to the life forms in the river. The owner of this facility has no right to cause such damage to the delicate systems of life that have evolved long before the facility existed. Thank you for considering my concern.

Document Accession #: 20211206-5009 Filed Date: 12/06/2021

C Grecsek, SUNDERLAND, MA.
I am writing to express my opposition to the re-licensing of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage facility. The system costs in energy, and especially in ecological damage, are too high.

The Connecticut River flows backward when the pumps are engaged, an unnatural and harmful process. In addition, the turbines kill countless fish and other river dwellers. The generation of electricity should not need to use so much energy to operate nor should it result in such senseless destruction of an ecosystem.

We have made great strides in the improvement of the Connecticut River from when it was essentially an open sewer, but there is more work to do to repair the harm we have caused, including the cessation of this damaging system.

Thank you

Document Accession #: 20211206-5008 Filed Date: 12/06/2021

robert arbib, cummington, MA.
Please reject the application of Firstlight to operate Northfield Mt.for another 50 years.This pumping station causes terrible disruption of the natural flow of the Connecticut River.I know as I canoe on this section of the river. Natural flows necessary for the life cycles of various vertebrates and invertebrates are disrupted, fish and other animals are shredded going up
through the pumps,the flow of the river is reversed during pumping and shallow areas are washed out and eroded as water is released.Firstlight will say they are addressing these concerns but they will promise anything to get a renewal. Please don’t believe their B.S,

Their model is to use massive amounts of power to pump water up. only to profit through ‘generation’ when rates are higher, It is not worth the damage to the river to generate not really new power but only profits for this Canadian company.

Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

Police action threatened at US Fish & Wildlife HQ as constituents try to deliver letters

Posted by on 01 Dec 2021 | Tagged as: Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Connecticut River Refuge, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, FERC licensing process, FirstLight, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Department of Energy and Environmental Affairs, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, migratory fish, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, Public Sector Pension Investments, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Wendi Weber, WWLP TV Channel 22 News

Police action threatened at US Fish & Wildlife HQ as constituents tried to deliver letters on Tuesday, November 30, 2021

A cold, socially-distanced public welcome at USFWS Headquaters in Hadley for visiting citizens as security guard reaches to phone police. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

SEE also, this Recorder article by Chris Larabee, here also featured in the Gazette: https://www.gazettenet.com/Two-make-20-mile-hike-to-protest-FirstLight-s-potential-relicensing-43803954

HADLEY MA. A security guard at Hadley’s US Fish and Wildlife Headquarters threatened to call police on Karl Meyer of Greenfield and Dave Dersham of Northampton and a handful of their supporters after completing a 20 mile protest walk to the facility at around 4 pm Tuesday. The two were interviewed by the Recorder and WWLP TV Channel 22 News along the route. Their trek from Greenfield to Hadley was made to call attention to a final, closed-door license “settlement” negotiation scheduled by Canada-owned FirstLight with the US Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries, and MA Division of Fish and Wildlife for Thursday, December 2nd. FirstLight wants the agencies to sign-off on a final deal in the 9 year-old Federal Energy Regulatory Commission process relicensing the massive suctioning of the Connecticut River at their 49 year old Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station.

Banner on federal relicensing of Northfield Mountain displayed at USFWS HQ. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The duo and three other citizens including a 14 year-old and an infant, were quickly denied entrance during regular business hours as they attempted to deliver notes and letters to USFWS Regional Director Wendi Weber. A security guard sitting behind a front lobby window tersely told them their letters, in an open manila envelope, would not be accepted at the public HQ. When they made further inquiry the guard became defensive, without offering alternatives, and then escalated the situation by demanding no picture taking was allowed and they leave the lobby or “I will call the police.” Asking why, the guard offered no further discussion, instead repeating the police threat and then dialing a phone where visitors heard her request that Hadley police cruiser be dispatched.

One of the messages constituents wanted to convey to USFWS Director Wendi Weber. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

At that point the visitors left the lobby with their letters, and continued their discussions in front of the unwelcoming Headquarters building. The group, also supported earlier in the day by a dozen protesters who’d met the two walkers on the Sunderland Bridge, were completing trip by collecting handwritten messages for Weber from the public. All were being sent to highlight the obliteration the 100’s of millions of eggs and young-of-the year migratory and resident fish killed by Northfield giant turbines annually. They are asking USFWS representatives to deny FirstLight’s license proposal of placing a temporary “barrier” net, with ¾ inch mesh, in front of NMPS for a few months each year. They say FL’s “safety net” will be patently ineffectual in preventing the long-standing annual carnage to Connecticut River fish populations in the heart of the ecosystem and S.O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge.

Supporters standing, post-ejection, in front of USFWS Headquarter. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

After several more minutes standing in the cold and talking in front of the headquarters Anne Sittauer, a USFWS Refuge Supervisor, was sent outside to speak to the group, now totaling eight. Sittauer stated the Region 5 Director was busy, but she would accept the letters on Weber’s behalf, giving assurances they’d reach her. No squad car ever arrived and no arrests took place among the peaceful visitors, after being threatened, denied entrance and receiving a patently-shabby un welcome at the facility. Surely it was an eye-opening public interaction for the teenager, the grandmother, and the handful of other citizens asking federal representatives to honor their public trust by protecting the public’s fish—fish being annually obliterated for the last 49 years in the heart of today’s S.O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge—one of only two of 568 national refuge’s with “fish” specifically in its title.

TODAY! Our RIVER, Our REFUGE; OUR FISH! * Last Standout: 10 am, Sunderland Bridge or ** 4 pm US Fish & Wildlife HQ, Hadley

Posted by on 29 Nov 2021 | Tagged as: America's best landscaped sewer, American shad, Connecticut River Refuge, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, FERC licensing process, FirstLight Power, Greenfield, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, P-2485, Public Sector Pension Investments, Rock Dam, shad, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Wendi Weber

TODAY! Our RIVER, Our REFUGE; OUR FISH! * Last Standout: 10 am, Sunderland Bridge, or ** 4 pm, US Fish & Wildlife HQ, Hadley

Dear Friends,

In 1997 our Connecticut River became the backbone and central artery of the S.O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge—an ecosystem-wide refuge encompassing the entire four-state Connecticut River Watershed. There are 568 national wildlife refuges, but just two specifically name “fish” in the title. One of them is OURS.

This December 2nd Canada-owned FirstLight Power has scheduled a final license “settlement” meeting with the US Fish & Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries, MA Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and MA DEP–hoping to sew-up their venture capital interests in our river for decades. Their cash cow is Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station—since 1972 the river’s deadliest, net-loss power contraption. This flow-reversing, grid-powered machine inhales miles of living river; then spits it back for profit—with all its fish, insects and aquatic life, dead.

FirstLight’s final license application offer is a death trap. “FirstLight proposes to install a barrier net in front of the Northfield Mountain Project intake/tailrace to prevent the entrainment of migratory fish when the Northfield Mountain Project is pumping. The net will be approximately 30-foot-high by 1050-feet-long wide with 3/4-inch mesh from top to bottom.” That temporary net, August to November, has ¾ inch mesh so large it amounts to a lethal, suctioning doorway for millions of eggs, larvae and baby shad—and, those of 26 other resident and migratory fish.

THERE IS NO REFUGE FOR FISH on the Connecticut River in Massachusetts. There’s only a death trap. So I am asking you to stand–one last time, ahead of FL’s grim, secrecy-filled December 2 meeting, and send a message to the US Fish and Wildlife Service: Our RIVER, Our REFUGE; OUR FISH! I long-ago vowed to bring our River’s relentless pillaging into the open across these last 9 years as a journalist and relicensing stakeholder—and that if there was one more thing to do to rescue this ecosystem for those who come later, I would not let it drop.

On Tuesday morning at 6 am, my dear friend and colleague Dave Dersham and I leave the Greenfield Common on a 20 mile protest walk to USFWS Headquarter in Hadley. We’ll carry fish nets–full of holes, representing FirstLight’s sham safety net. We’l reach Sunderland Bridge at 10 am, and hope you will meet us for a brief rally—with your own full-of-holes safety nets, stockings and signs to send a message to US Fish & Wildlife Regional Director Wendi Weber: Our RIVER, Our REFUGE; OUR FISH! Please bring a note card with a message to Ms. Weber we’ll deliver in writing at around 4 pm at the USFWS Headquarters, 300 Westgate Center Drive, Hadley—just past the Rt. 116/Rt. 9 intersection. If folks met us there, we’d be delighted as well.

Thank you for marching to Northfield Mountain, to ravaged riverbanks where sturgeon can’t spawn, and standing out on the Turners Falls Bridge and Greenfield Common–for the letters to FERC, To the Editor, and the Oped pieces. Tuesday is “Giving Tuesday.” Let’s stand together to offer a real REFUGE to coming generations—and stop FirstLight’s grim license to kill.

The Connecticut River’s MASS. Killer is Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage

Posted by on 23 Oct 2021 | Tagged as: Andrew Fisk, Atlantic salmon, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Connecticut River clean up, Connecticut River Conservancy, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Death-Sewer, E-Comments, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FirstLight, Gordon van Welie, ISO-NEW ENGLAND, Kathleen Theoharides, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, Mr. Caleb Slater, Mr. Charles Baker, Mr. Gordon van Welie, Mr. Jesse Leddick, Mr. Mark S. Tisa, Ms. Donna Wieting, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, source to sea, Uncategorized, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Supreme Court, Vermont Fish & Game, Wendi Weber

The Connecticut River’s MASS. Killer is Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage, a law-breaking ecosystem disaster

READ Bill Stubblefield’s great river defense to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and to those responsible for protecting the public’s Connecticut River for future generations here: BillStubblefield20211022-5051-1

WATCH, HEAR my Friends of the Greenfield Public Library presentation: “LIVING RIVERS FLOW DOWNSTREAM,” a 50 year history of Northfield Mountain’s killing and the officials responsible for stopping its license to kill here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qs4LHjrjtsc

Below is a list of those responsible for ending this illegal license to kill.

Do share it with your local leaders and representatives. Will they step up and end this ecosystem slaughter for coming generations? Where do they stand? What will they do to stop this killing NOW?

The FOLLOWING OFFICIALS have NO RIGHT to bargain away the life of OUR CHILDREN’s ECOSYSTEM. This is THEIR WATCH. They have a PUBLIC TRUST to defend against Connecticut River Extinction and a 40 year Connecticut River death sentence in Massachusetts:

Ms.Kathleen Theoharides, Secretary, MA Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs
Mr. Charles Baker, Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Mr. Andy Fisk, MA Public Representative, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Dir. Connecticut River Conservancy
Mr. Gordon van Welie, President and CEO, ISO-New England
Ms. Wendi Weber, US Fish & Wildlife Service Northeast Regional Director
Ms. Donna Wieting Director of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service
Mr. Mark S. Tisa, Director of the MA Division of Fisheries and Wildlife
Mr. Caleb Slater, MA Div. of Fish & Wildlife, Anadromous Fish Project Leader CRASC
Mr. Jesse Leddick, Chief of Regulatory Review
MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife

CONNECTICUT RIVER DEFENSE EVENTS Ramp up before this Saturday’s “No License to Kill” Rally on the GREENFIELD TOWN COMMON

Posted by on 19 Oct 2021 | Tagged as: Andrew Fisk, Connecticut River ecosystem, Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FirstLight Power, fish kill, ISO-NEW ENGLAND, Kathleen Theoharides, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Mr. Caleb Slater, Mr. Charles Baker, Mr. Gordon van Welie, Mr. Jesse Leddick, Mr. Mark S. Tisa, Ms. Donna Wieting, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, pumped storage, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Wendi Weber

Connecticut River Defense Events Ramp up before this Saturday’s “No License to Kill” Rally on the GREENFIELD COMMON at 11 a.m.

Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

It is inspiring to witness the strength and commitment of citizens rising to defend the Connecticut River against any Federal Energy Regulatory Commission licensing of Canadian-owned FirstLight Power’s massive lethal daily suctioning at Northfield Mountain. READ BELOW! These people are saying NO to a license for Northfield Mountain, NO to licensing the virtual obliteration of all natural characteristics of a living Connecticut River in Massachusetts—the critical artery at the center of the 4-state Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish & Wildlife Refuge; NO to Northfield Mountain, FirstLight’s river-killing, energy-sucking cash cow.

All THIS, ahead of Saturday’s 11 a.m. RALLY on the Greenfield Town Common against the secret talks between Canada’s FirstLight and US Fish & Wildlife, MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife, MA Department of Environmental Protection to auction off the life of an ecosystem that belongs to FUTURE GENERATIONS.

Again, this Saturday, October 23, 11-noon, on the Greenfield Town Common: NO FIRSTLIGHT/NORTHFIELD FERC LICENSE TO KILL! Rally.

From The Recorder from Susan Olmsted, this great piece:
https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-olmstead-FirstLightMethodAffectsCTRiver-42975815

Also airing TODAY at 6 pm, and repeating on the EnviroShow on Valley Free Radio—or anytime with the second link below, I speak with Don Ogden (d.o.) and Glen Ayers about “river-cide”
https://envirosho.blogspot.com/
https://archive.org/details/ct-river-enviro-show-interview-with-karl-meyer-10-14-21

AND ON THURSDAY, at 7 pm, I will give a Zoom talk entitled “LIVING RIVERS FLOW DOWNSTREAM” with the Friends of the Greenfield Public Library.
Please join in by requesting a link by emailing: librarian@greenfieldpubliclibrary.org

juvenile Connecticut River American shad, dead

Do share this with your local leaders and representatives. Where do they stand? Will they attend??

The FOLLOWING OFFICIALS need to understand they have NO RIGHT to bargain away the life of OUR CHILDREN’s ECOSYSTEM. This is THEIR WATCH. They have a PUBLIC TRUST to defend against Connecticut River Extinction and a 40 year river death sentence here in Massachusetts:

Ms.Kathleen Theoharides, Secretary, MA Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs
Mr. Charles Baker, Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Mr. Andy Fisk, MA Public Representative, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Dir. Connecticut River Conservancy
Mr. Gordon van Welie, President and CEO, ISO-New England
Ms. Wendi Weber, US Fish & Wildlife Service Northeast Regional Director
Ms. Donna Wieting Director of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service
Mr. Mark S. Tisa, Director of the MA Division of Fisheries and Wildlife
Mr. Caleb Slater, MA Div. of Fish & Wildlife, Anadromous Fish Project Leader CRASC
Mr. Jesse Leddick, Chief of Regulatory Review
MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife

Connecticut River blog: source of a salmon sham; how the public can steer a river’s future

Posted by on 21 Jul 2021 | Tagged as: 5-year FERC licensing process, Brian Harrington, Catherine Carlson, climate change, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, CRASC, Daniel McKiernan, David Cameron, Donna Wieting, E-Comments, Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, Eversource, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FERC Comments, FERC Commissioner Richard Glick, FERC Secretary Kimberly D. Bose, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, Gordon van Welie, Holyoke Co. v Lyman, ISO-NEW ENGLAND, Jesse Leddick, Julie Crocker, Kathleen Theoharides, Kimberly D. Bose, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, Local Bias, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, New Hampshire, NMFS, NOAA, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, P-1889, P-2485, Peter Brandien, Public Comment period, Public Sector Pension Investments, Rock Dam, Sam Lovejoy, Sean McDermott, shad, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Steven Mattocks, Timothy L. Timmermann, Turners Falls, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Vermont, Wendi Weber

Connecticut River blog: source of a salmon sham; how the public can steer a river’s future Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

Kathleen Theoharides, Massachuetts’ Secretary of the Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs before launching on a PR kayak tour of the river at FirstLight’s dock next to the intake of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, October 2020. Photo Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

NOTE: as a journalist and citizen I’ve been a participating stakeholder for nearly a decade in the ongoing Federal Energy Regulatory Commission relicensing process for the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project and Turners Falls/Cabot hydro operations. In that light, I encourage people to first view the half-hour segment of Local Bias, linked below. Then, return to this post and its resource list below for ways to participate in the critical decisions now being made about the Connecticut River. They will impact its currently crippled ecosystem for generations to come.

LOCAL BIAS link: https://youtu.be/IX2Rv2NYq3s

Since 1872 the US Supreme Court has made it the law of the land that migratory fish on US Rivers are guaranteed safe upstream and downstream passage at dams and industrial river sites. That decision was centered on a Massachusetts case at the Holyoke Dam. One hundred forty-nine years later that law remains essentially unfulfilled at an endangered species’ critical spawning and nursery site on the Connecticut River at Montague, MA, as well as at the Turners Falls Dam in that town.

Further, that law remains glaringly unenforced and unimplemented at the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project in Northfield MA, where the river is literally sucked into reverse, and millions of eggs and downstream running juvenile American shad are pulled to their “functional extirpation”(vacuumed to their deaths) yearly, on their way to the ocean from Vermont and New Hampshire spawning reaches. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has now owed Vermont and New Hampshire—and really all of New England, a living river for almost exactly a century and a half.

Warning sign announcing the dangers of Northfield’s massive intake suction. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The current Canadian parent-owners of that net-loss power regeneration/resale site are proposing only an ineffective, seasonal “barrier net” at the vacuum mouth of this facility, the very ‘solution’ that leaves this monstrous sucking in place to kill all those Vermont and New Hampshire produced eggs and baby shad, crippling the prospects for returning adult shad to those states from the Atlantic four years in the future.

The donuts and coffee were on FirstLight for the state officials and representatives taking part in last October’s little PR kayak tour. Photo Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

Northfield Mountain’s net-power-loss energy consumption literally swallows and squanders the entire annual energy equivalents of whole cities and counties as it ravages the Connecticut River, using it as a crushing and deadly energy relay switch.

FirstLight is applying to FERC—backed up by a power-hungry, ecosystem-and-climate-indifferent ISO-New England, for a license to kill for decades to come. Northfield Mountain wastes monstrous amounts of grid energy, while ravaging New England’s critical main ocean connection and planetary cooling artery…

Below are resources available to the public for interacting and participating with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in licensing decisions, and government agency officials charged with implementing the public trust on the Connecticut River.

www.karlmeyerwriting.com/blog

NOTE: the landmark US Supreme Court environmental decision centered on the Connecticut River came back in 1872 in Holyoke Company v. Lyman, requiring safe up- and down-stream protection for migratory fish.

Send public comments on relicensing of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project and Turners Falls/Cabot Hydro Stations to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The “project numbers” must be included, as well as your name and address, in order to become part of the public record. They should be concise, citing specifics in a paragraph or two, noting Northfield Mountain P-2485 and Turners Falls/Cabot P-1889.

Send via www.ferc.gov, usingE-comment, with the salutation going to: “Kimberly D. Bowles, Secretary.” Those comments can also include a cc to the current chair of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission: Richard Glick.

Decisions concerning foreign interests and use of the Connecticut River are happening at this time, and the river in Massachusetts has sat largely emptied or dead here for half a century—a situation enabled by the Commonwealth and its officials’ enduring, ugly and pointed environmental neglect.

To gain effect, letters can be cc’d to federal-and-state officials who are the vested stakeholders representing the public in the protection of the river and resources. Those publicly recorded FERC entries can also be forwarded to local newspapers and media outlets.

LIST of executives–plus officials from federal and state agencies who represent the public in protecting the Connecticut, its migratory fish, aquatic animals and habitats through their “conditioning authority” powers:

ENERGY executives in the private/quasi-public sphere:

Mr. Gordon van Welie, President and CEO, ISO-New England, the “independent” system operator:
Phone (413) 540-4220

Mr. Peter Brandien, Vice President of System Operations, ISO-New England:

E-mail: pbrandien@iso-ne.com .

NOTE: Mr. Brandien writes the annual support letter that facilitates the daily commercial damage to the Connecticut wrought by the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project. ISO has never acknowledged to the public that NMPS is NOT essential to the DAILY functioning of the power grid. Instead it encourages and shackles the public to those peak-priced, daily ravages as NMPS is handsomely paid to hold back several hours of reserve emergency-function megawatts for ISO’s 20th Century bulk power grid in case of a rare blackout (like the one in 2003), and also for occasional use–at scattered intervals, in controlling grid fluctuations.

ISO should have ago been curtailed as a functionary for private mega power interests. Today’s grid should already be based on distributed generation and micro-grid functions in this time of climate chaos and cyber crime. Energy and storage should be located nearest to where it is produced and used. Future linking of river-ravaging NMPS to 200-mile-distant wind turbines is wholly criminal when compressed air storage can be located close to metro/industrial coastal centers—including implementation at sites like Everett, Somerset, New Bedford, and elsewhere. That would render the system resilient, local and detachable–and rescue New England’s Connecticut River ecosystem to support generations to come across the next half century.

But, today and into the future, counter to Holyoke Co. v. Lyman, , ISO will happily sell off a US ecosystem’s daily life to foreign venture capital interests, keeping NMPS in lucrative daily play for decades into the future. The bottom line function of ISO-New England—forget ecosystems and climate, is apparently commercial first, and foremost. In their own words: to “protect the health of the region’s economy and the well-being of its people by ensuring the constant availability of competitively-priced wholesale electricity—today and for future generations.” They love to employ the term “clean”, but never elaborate on glaring incongruities, fallacies or impacts. Future generations apparently will have no need of living ecosystems, just an endless stream of “competitively-priced” energy. They NEVER mention energy CONSERVATION…

FEDERAL PUBLIC officials:

For endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, freshwater mussels, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eel:
Donna Wieting, Director of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA Fisheries:
Phone: 301-427-8400

Also, for endangered shortnose sturgeon, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eels: Mr. Sean Mcdermott, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:

E-mail: Sean.mcdermott@noaa.gov

Also at NMFS, protecting shortnose sturgeon and their habitat: Ms. Julie Crocker, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:

E-mail: Julie.crocker@noaa.gov

For federal protection and enforcement of the Clean Water Act on the Connecticut River: Mr. Timothy L. Timmermann Office of Environmental Review, EPA New England Region 1, Boston MA 02109-3912:

E-mail: timmermann.timothy@epa.gov

For all migratory fish and safe passage on the Connecticut including American shad, herring, and endangered sturgeon: Wendi Weber, US Fish & Wildlife Service Region 5, Hadley MA 01035:

E-mail: wendi_weber@usfws.gov

MASSACHUSETTS state officials:

Kathleen Theoharides, Secretary of the MA Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs 100 Cambridge St., Suite 900, Boston, MA 02114:
Main Phone at (617) 626-1000

For Massachusetts clean water and wetland habitat protections on the Connecticut: Mr. Brian Harrington, Bureau of Water Resources Deputy Regional Director, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight Street, Springfield MA 01103:

E-mail: Brian.d.harrington@state.ma.us

Also from MA DEP: Mr. David Cameron, PWS Section Chief, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight St., Springfield, MA 01103:

E-mail: David.cameron@state.ma.us

For state-endangered shortnose sturgeon and all Connecticut River migratory fish in MA: Mr. Jesse Leddick, Chief of Regulatory Review, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:

E-mail: Jesse.Leddick@mass.gov

Also at MA Div. of Fish & Wildlife: Mr. Steven Mattocks, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, Fisheries, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:

E-mail: steven.mattocks.@mass.gov

THE GREAT FAILURE TO PROTECT

Posted by on 22 May 2021 | Tagged as: Cabot Woods, Clean Water Act, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Endangered Species Act, Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, ESA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chairman, FERC Commissioner Richard Glick, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, Julie Crocker, Kathleen Theoharides, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection, Monte Belmonte, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Nipmuck, NMFS, Norwottuck, P-1889, P-2485, Pocumtuck, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, Section 9–Prohibition of Take Section 9(a)(1), Shortnose Stout, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, State of Delaware, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey, Wendi Weber, wrsi.com

THE GREAT FAILURE TO PROTECT: Flaunting the Endangered Species Act and Other federal and state laws governing clean water and habitat on the Connecticut River at Rock Dam in Massachusetts


Photo credit: US Geological Service

FirstLight’s Turners Falls and Cabot Station under the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission License #: FERC P-1889.

The ROCK DAM spawning nursery on the Connecticut River: the ONLY documented NATURAL spawning site for the ONLY FEDERALLY-ENDANGERED MIGRATORY FISH on the Connecticut River: the CONNECTICUT RIVER SHORTNOSE STURGEON.


Desiccating and baking shortnose sturgeon nursery habitat in the Connecticut River at the Rock Dam pool on May 21, 2021.
Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The FEDERAL ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, Section 9: the term “TAKE” MAKES IT ILLEGAL TO: “to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect, or to attempt to engage in any such conduct.”

Other federal and state laws NOT being ENFORCED on the Connecticut River at this critical habitat: the CLEAN WATER ACT, THE WETLANDS PROTECTION ACT, and, the Supreme Court’s 1872 landmark environmental decision for the Connecticut River in Holyoke Company v. Lyman—mandating that private operators of dams and facilities on the Connecticut—and thence for all rivers, must provide safe upstream and downstream passage for migratory fish.

A red slurry enters the Connecticut at the Rock Dam

Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

When there is no WATCHDOG, there is no ENFORCEMENT.

THE: federal and state agencies and leaders responsible for implementation, protection and enforcement of laws and conditions protecting spawning, habitat, life-cycle and survival of the Connecticut River’s sole federal and state endangered migratory fish: THE CONNECTICUT RIVER SHORTNOSE STURGEON

THEIR NAMES:

Phil Glick, Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission:
Julie Crocker: Branch Chief, Endangered Fish Recovery unit, NOAA, Gloucester MA (
Kathleen Theoharides: Sec. of MA Energy & Environmental Affairs
Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection
Ron Amidon: Commissioner MA Dept. of Fish & Game
Daniel McKiernan: Director MA Division of Marine Fisheries
Wendi Weber: Director Region 5, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Here is a link to further discussion of testing the connection between the TF Canal and grim sludge at Rock Dam–w/Monte Belmonte, WRSI.com
https://wrsi.com/monte/how-to-save-the-shortnose-sturgeon/

When there is no WATCHDOG, there is no ENFORCEMENT.

CONNECTICUT RIVER: maybe not left for DEAD after all

Posted by on 04 May 2021 | Tagged as: American shad, Anadromous Fish Conservation Act, Andrew Fisk, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Connecticut River Watershed Council, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, CRC, Daniel McKiernan: Director MA Division of Marine Fisheries, Delaware LLC, Eversource, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FirstLight, Julie Crocker, Kathleen Theoharides, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Martin Suuberg, Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, NMFS, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, Ron Amidon: Commissioner MA Dept. of Fish and Game, Source to Sea Cleanup, State of Delaware, The Greenfield Recorder, Traprock Center for Peace and Justice, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Wendi Weber

CONNECTICUT RIVER: maybe not left for DEAD after all

Following the Great Earth Week Walk for River Survival to the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project on April 24th, it’s been inspiring to see people publicly raising their voices to pull the grim, daily carnage of that power-hungry machine out from the shadows. One of particular insight was written by Susan Olmsted and appeared in The Recorder on April 30:
https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-olmsted-NorthfieldHydroStation-40211638 . Later, Ms. Olmsted relayed those same points into the public record of Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s relicensing comments for the Northfield docket: FERC P-2485. Those are the routes to raising the public profile of our endlessly crippled River—its fate all but buried under confidentiality agreements and generations of inaction by the responsible agencies and so-called protectors. They all continue to lay low in a process that will decide our river’s ultimate viability for decades.


At the NMPS Intake. Photo Copyright © 2021 by James Smethurst

I again must thank the Traprock Center for Peace and Justice and Anna Gyorgy for organizing the event. Having written about this broken river for decades, and now having served on the Fish and Aquatics Study Team in this endless FERC process since 2012, it was an honor to speak up for the river with a caring and determined crowd in attendance. As I’ve noted to several people, last October I witnessed MA Energy Secretary Kathleen Theoharides and Watershed Council/Conservancy Director Andy Fisk launch a PR canoe tour for elected officials–directly upstream of the killer suction pipes of Northfield. In grim, self-serving fashion neither stepped up to the TV cameras or spoke with attendant reporters to proclaim, “This thing is our river’s greatest killer, it should be closed; this company, FirstLight, wholly re-registered these holdings out of state into Delaware as tax shelters two years back—they have no business here.” Shame on them both.

Watershed Council/CRC Director Andy Fisk, in vest, Chairs the Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission 12/10/2018

BTW, we spoke at some depth on the Walk about the NU/Eversource building-of, and current massive connections to NMPS–and also the long-standing financial and Source to Sea greenwashing links between the Watershed Council/Conservancy and Eversource? Well, here’s a little late-breaking Eversource monopoly news: https://www.eenews.net/stories/1063731537

Personally, I would feel I’d failed our Great River, this ecosystem and coming generations had I never stood in front of this killer to bear witness to the truth. NMPS is a killer, and no configuration that leaves its grim sucking mouth open for ANY part of the year will retrieve it from being the most lethal machine ever deployed on the Connecticut. After so many years I am grateful that I had that opportunity–to stand up with other people and keep faith with our river–and link with those who will depend on its living waters in the future.


Revival Walk Crowd April 24, 2021 Photo Copyright © 2021 by David Keith

I don’t think a single person in attendance that day believes the snake-oil logic for continuing NMPS: that wasting massive amounts of energy to actually pull a river backward for miles–sucking 100s of millions of fish to their deaths as it wrenches its deadened water up a mountain, will ever be any kind energy “clean” or “green” solution on a heating-up planet whose ecosystems are unraveling. FirstLight’s will merely continue the laying-waste to our long-crippled river. It has nourished life here for millennia; they want to trade that in for their few hours of peak-priced energy.


MA Secretary of Energy & Environmental Affairs Kathleen Theoharides talks to the media–just yards away from Northfield’s deadly intake on a fluff PR tour on the river, October 2020. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

It’s important to remember that this machine’s emplacement ran counter to one of the most significant landmark environmental decisions ever from the US Supreme Court, centered right here on the Connecticut River in 1872. In Holyoke Company v. Lyman the Court decided private operators of dams and facilities on the Connecticut—and thence, for all rivers, must provide safe upstream and downstream passage for migratory fish. Nearly 150 years later, this machine continues crushing millions of migratory fish—among them federal trust American shad, blueback herring and American eels. That killing occurs for eggs, larvae, juveniles and adult fish across the many months of their full migratory life cycles.

With the presence of a real watchdog, NMPS’s illegal presence never would have arisen here. There were decades to have sued for its shutdown. Today, neither its operation–nor FirstLight’s thin mitigation proposal to put up a partial, temporary net across its mouth annually that might spare some adult shad and eels from its suction just two months out of their killing year, even remotely passes the smell test for legal operation in a US Fish & Wildlife Refuge.

Raising public voices and flushing the buried dealings in this race-to-the-bottom FERC relicensing process is now the key to having some real impact in saving the Connecticut.

This Great River still feeds bodies and souls. It’s been struggling for well over half a century without an entity taking on the necessary mandate to “enforce” and take on the employ of a day-to-day legal team worthy of facing down predator corporations. This is an ecosystem destined to failure if citizens stay on the sidelines. But people are getting it; and standing up. Maybe this critical life-line of a river can be revived for the coming half century, to again nourish those of the future.

WORTH NOTING: Massachusetts and federal agency officials responsible for securing a living Connecticut River for your great, great, grand kids–upstream and down, through to Vermont and New Hampshire:

Kathleen Theoharides: Sec. of MA Energy & Environmental Affairs
Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection
Ron Amidon: Commissioner MA Dept. of Fish & Game
Daniel McKiernan: Director MA Division of Marine Fisheries
Wendi Weber: Director Region 5, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Julie Crocker: Branch Chief, Endangered Fish Recovery unit, NOAA, Gloucester MA (endangered CT River shortnose sturgeon habitat)

NOAA has once-in-a-lifetime Recovery Plan opportunity for sturgeon

Posted by on 17 Jan 2017 | Tagged as: Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Dr. Boyd Kynard, endangerd shortnose sturgeon, ESA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Jack Buckley, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Mr. John Bullard, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, NOAA Fisheries Regional Administrator, Regional Director of the National Marine Fisheries Service, Rock Dam, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Wendi Weber

KM-Rock Dam program 4-23-16
(Above:crowd attending shortnose sturgeon program at the Rock Dam spawning site, April 2016. Presenters were Dr. Boyd Kynard and me. CLICK and click again to ENLARGE.)

Below is a letter to Regional NOAA Fisheries Director John Bullard requesting immediate action to gather small funds to take advantage of a unique Recovery Plan Step that has literally been waiting in the wings for 167 years. Small Recovery Plan funds are needed to monitor newly-returning endangered shortnose sturgeon as they regain upstream access to their natural spawning reach in the Connecticut River for the FIRST TIME SINCE 1849! Recovery Plan opportunities and low-cost, critical federal science in the public interest come around but once in a Blue Moon.

Please feel free to copy the text of this letter, paste in your own information noting your concerns, and forward to Mr. Bullard and the two other fisheries directors cc’d here. Help these newly-arriving federally endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon successfully SPAWN on their ancient home grounds for the first time in over a century and a half!

Karl Meyer
Greenfield, MA
413-773-0006

Mr. John K. Bullard, NOAA Fisheries Regional Administrator January 16, 2017
Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office
55 Republic Drive
Gloucester, MA 01930
john.bullard@noaa.gov

Dear Mr. Bullard,

I’m one of many New Englanders anxious to see the Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon begin its long-belated recovery here by finally having a chance to regain its documented natural spawning habitat in Turners Falls–and experiencing conditions where it can successfully reproduce. Nine years late license agreements at Holyoke Dam have finally been met allowing SNS to pass upstream in significant numbers. This is literally the first progress made in this species’ name here since it was placed on the original federal Endangered Species List in 1967. And this is the first time since 1849 that these fish will have a real chance at increasing their genetic diversity, as well as their numbers. This is their chance at recovery.

It’s come to my attention that a unique opportunity exists to track SNS in the By Pass Reach of the Connecticut River in Turners Falls this spring. The USGS Conte Lab has proposed a straightforward, acceptable, and verifiable study plan. Apparently all that is needed for this simple study to go forward is $20,000. This is an extremely modest expenditure for your agency. This unique opportunity to collect information in the first season in 167 years that SNS have been able to return upstream to this site will never come around again. This study will document whether these fish are successfully arriving and accessing their chosen age-old spawning habitats. Critical, baseline information.

NOAA’s own banner states it provides science based conservation and management for sustainable fisheries and aquaculture, marine mammals, endangered species, and their habitats. There is no better belated-opportunity to fulfill that mandate vis-à-vis the Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon than to provide the small funding this study requires. Members of your endangered species team are aware of this, and have expressed enthusiasm for this study to go forward. Further, your fisheries colleagues from other federal and state agencies share a common mandate and concern for the SNS’s protection and recovery. This modest study will help to further that end, particularly given that in just 15 months a new federal license will be signed with the new Canadian owners of these hydro installation and facilities whose operation will directly impact the recovery and spawning success of SNS.

This time-sensitive request for small funding can demonstrate due diligence by NOAA in its migratory fisheries and habitat protections mandate here. Please make us proud of NOAA’s shortnose sturgeon Recovery Plan efforts and make these funds available immediately so that this key spring work can go forward. Your colleagues, state and regional directors at USFWS and MA Division of Fish & Wildlife may be able contribute as well as both Ms. Weber and Mr. Buckley have hands-on experience with endangered SNS research. They are being cc’d here. Thank you.

Sincerely,
Karl Meyer
Cc: Wendi_Weber@fws.gov; jack.buckley@state.ma.us

(BELOW: the Rock Dam and its adjacent pool to the left–the sole documented natural spawning site for shortnose sturgeon on the Connecticut River. USGS Conte Fish Lab is a few hundred yards southeast of this site. CLICK to enlarge; then click again.)
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