The Recorder

Archived Posts from this Category

CONNECTICUT RIVER CASUAL TRAGIC HISTORY HIKE: Sat., May 14th

Posted by on 06 May 2022 | Tagged as: America's best landscaped sewer, Andrew Fisk, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Day of Mourning, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Federal Conte Anadromous Fish Research Center, federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeion, Great Falls, Jesse Leddick, Julie Crocker, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, Mark Tisa, Martin Suuberg, migratory fish, Nation's best landscaped sewer, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, no license to kill, NOAA, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, public trust, Rock Dam, shad, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey's Conte Fish Lab, USFWS, Wendi Weber

THE CONNECTICUT RIVER CASUAL TRAGIC HISTORY HIKE:
Saturday, May 14, 2022, 9:30 – 11:00 a.m..

The April 2, 2022, Connecticut River Day of Mourning. Photo courtesy of John Bos.

Trip meets 9:30 in the courtyard of the Great Falls Discovery Center and continues onto the Rail Trail. Photo Copyright © 2022 by Karl Meyer

I hope some folks are able join this long and casual history walk. * * Please be aware that it will be close to 5 miles–with the return to Great Falls to be done on your own. As noted, a bike or even a 2nd car-pool, relay-car can be left near the walk’s end and return point. Bikes can be locked near Conte Lab–also, relay cars could be parked in the public lot at the end of G-Street, where “Migratory Way” continues along the canal heading the last 1/2 mile to Rock Dam. (I’ll be on my bike.)

The April 2nd Connecticut River Day of Mourning. Photo courtesy of John Bos.

The Connecticut River casual, tragic history hike
Saturday, May 14, 2022, 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Meet: Great Falls Discovery Center courtyard, Avenue A, Turners Falls
Free. No pre-registration required. * * Rain cancels.

Join journalist Karl Meyer for this 2-1/2 mile (one-way) unnatural history walk, starting at the Great Falls Discovery Center and Turners Falls dam’s failed salmon ladder. This casual hike partly follows the Rail Trail’s 200 year old transportation and power canal. We’ll cross it on a one-way bridge, pass a 1906 generating station; then head to G Street and down “Migratory Way” to unprotected sturgeon habitat at the river’s Rock Dam near the USGS Conte Fish Lab. We end above the failed fish ladder adjacent to Cabot hydro station. NOTE: * * Participants responsible for returning to Great Falls on their own (total: 5-mile round trip). It’s possible to pre-stash a locked bike near Conte Lab along Migratory Way, then cycle back via the Rail Trail.

DEAD American shad at the Rock Dam, May 2021: a public trust migratory fish guaranteed safe passage to VT and NH waters by the US Supreme Court back in 1872. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

*** OH, and here are a few LINKS, the first two comprising defense of an undefended river by citizens; the last three are where foreign vultures are spending the ill-gotten spoils from our massively broken river–far from our Valley ecosystem:

https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-Meyer-Don-t-Take-FirstLight-for-Granted-46104531

https://www.recorder.com/ltr-Ogden-FirstLight-s-Lack-of-Urgency-Threatening-Shortnose-Sturgeon-46144862

https://energycentral.com/news/invenergy-and-energyre-secure-offshore-wind-lease-award-and-announce-formation-investor

https://www.bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/news/2022/05/02/hydro-electric-firstlight-allegheny-8-9.html

https://apnews.com/press-release/business-wire/business-new-york-pennsylvania-ca11a3273cfb45eeb0e7181075ebe2df

Connecticut River: citizens taking a stand to end Northfield Mountain’s half century of killing

Posted by on 02 Apr 2022 | Tagged as: America's best landscaped sewer, Clean Water Act, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Day of Mourning, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FirstLight Power, Greenfield Recorder, Julie Crocker, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Mark Tisa, Martin Suuberg, migratory fish, Mr. Mark S. Tisa, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, New Hampshire, no license to kill, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, PSP Investments, The Recorder, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, US Supreme Court, USFWS, Vermont, Vermont Digger, VT Digger, Waterkeeper Alliance, Wendi Weber, wrsi.com


The giant sucking intake mouth of FirstLight/PSP Investment’s Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, where it preys on the aquatic life of the Connecticut in three New England states.Photo Copyright © 2022 by Karl Meyer

Things to understand about the current extended (expired April 30, 2018) and proposed FirstLight federal license for Northfield Mountain operations:

* Under commonly occurring conditions, its suction and pumping will continue to force more than 5 miles of the river to flow backwards.

* Northfield Mountain’s daily use will continue to obliterate 100s of millions of fish and aquatic animals annually.

* It’s suction and subsequent regurgitation of a deadened river at over 15,000 cubic feet per second, and 20,000 cubic feet per second respectively, for hours on end, is roughly the equivalent of swallowing all the aquatic life in the 4-story, 19,000 sq. ft. Hawkes and Reed building in Greenfield–one EVERY second, SIXTY every minute, THREE THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED per hour…

The turbines of the pump station suck in life and throw out death,” Shayla Freeland, Gill MA.

The gross megawatts it squanders yearly sucking the river backward could directly power the annual needs of cities and towns up and down this Valley. Instead it will suck out a river’s soul.”
Karl Meyer, Greenfield MA, from the Greenfield Recorder and vtdigger.org.

A There is NO WATCHDOG HERE: interview on THE RIVER ahead of the Connecticut River Day of Mourning.
https://wrsi.com/monte/mourning-the-connecticut-river/

Those seeking a true watchdog model with commitment, staff lawyers and enforcement intent might do well to investigate the Riverkeeper/Waterkeeper organization.

UNDERSTAND: there is no new signed license yet. Only the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission can issue one. FERC itself must ensure that any new license must comply with all existing US environmental laws. This machine does not; and cannot meet those requirements.

The US Supreme Courts decision in 1872 in Holyoke Co. v. Lyman confirmed there must be safe upstream and downstream passage of migratory fish on all US rivers. Canadian-parent owned FirstLight’s proposal fails this.

A river flowing backwards does not meet the standards of the Clean Water Act. You cannot license such impact on a US river.
Northfield Mountain, Northfield MA, where the Connecticut River ecosystem dies… Photo Copyright © 2022, by Karl Meyer

FirstLight’s proposed temporary and flimsy barrier “net” will not even be anchored in the riverbed, and will leave eggs, fish and young of three states exposed to Northfield’s massive suction in their most fragile months of development.

There is nothing in the plan to monitor it daily, below the surface, where the killing occurs. The see-sawing pressure from Northfield and natural river storm flows will very likely leaving it loose and flopping in the current–just as the old net for factory-produced baby salmon did for a quarter century, beginning back in the 1980s. It’s a red herring.

In short, if relicensed, the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, will continue to kill and erase a living Connecticut River ecosystem in Massachusetts daily. It’s uses has been illegal from the day it opened in 1972, a CENTURY after Holyoke Co. v Lyman.

* *GO ON THE RECORD WITH FERC: tell them “no new license to kill.” Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

Then go public, letters, op eds, papers… tell US Fish & Wildlife Service’s Wendi Weber, MA Fish & Wildlife’s Mark Tisa, National Marine Fisheries Julie Crocker, and MA DEP’s Martin Suuberg that
the Connecticut River will not be left to die here in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts… It’s THE PUBLIC’s RIVER.

NO RIVER SHOULD DIE IN THE DARK!

Greenwashing, or How Many Times Can You Sell a Dead River?

Posted by on 09 Mar 2022 | Tagged as: America's best landscaped sewer, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Daily Hampshire Gazette, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, fish kill, Greenfield Recorder, Julie Crocker, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Mark Tisa, Martin Suuberg, Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection, Massachusetts DEP, Nation's best landscaped sewer, net-loss power, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, right-to-know, Rock Dam, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, The Springfield Republican, UMass, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Wendi Weber, Will Ryan

It’s like an old joke: HOW MANY TIMES CAN YOU SELL A DEAD RIVER? In the case of the Connecticut River and the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project the answer is: Twice a Day for Fifty Years!

And the new answer to that old joke–if our federal and state leaders fail to step up again for this ecosystem: TWICE A DAY FOR 100 YEARS AND COUNTING!

Participants in a 2016 program at the fragile Rock Dam spawning habitat of the shortnose sturgeon that I did with Boyd Kynard.

Please, if you missed it in the Daily Hampshire Gazette or The Recorder, read BELOW the terrific op ed by Will Ryan, a UMass graduate and Northfield Mountain investigator, along with his colleagues. Will attended one of my river programs at the fragile Rock Dam spawning habitat of the federally endangered shortnose sturgeon. It sunk in–what a failed and unprotected ecosystem exists in Massachusetts, and that there really has never been a watchdog here to force the corporations or the agencies to comply with established law. It’s seen as merely a cash cow, run amok.

https://www.masslive.com/opinion/2022/03/firstlight-is-greenwashing-effects-on-health-of-connecticut-river-viewpoint.html

Joyriders descend on the fragile Rock Dam habitat, an ancient, starved and embattled place that many of us consider sacrosanct for its biological and cultural significance.

In a time when the very fabric of the Earth is rapidly fraying, it would be criminal of public officials to turn their back on the chance to revive the key living artery of our ecosystem. The US Fish & Wildlife Service, MA Dept. of Environmental Protection, MA Fisheries & Wildlife and NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries must step up now. The ugly scale of this antiquated scheme is to relicense the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station to literally continue sucking away the life of the river for the next half century–re-marketing its deadened flow as twice-produced, net-loss megawatts to places as far away as New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland.

Right now leaders of those agencies are getting a second chance to do what’s morally and ethically required to assure there’s a Connecticut River legacy to pass on to future generations. Will they stand up, or will they bow to a short-sighted, long-term corporate cash scheme that trades an ecosystem for a net-loss, mega-scale power export configuration?

Predecessors of those four agencies failed disastrously 50 years ago by agreeing to allow that uninvestigated, brutal and lethally-disruptive machine to be installed on the Connecticut River. Today, that deadly contraption is being cleverly rebranded as clean, renewable and Earth-friendly–pedaled as the single best idea to accomplish energy storage for future generations here. In fact, its brutality has been unparalleled in this river’s natural history.

River-killing pumped storage is a 20th century crime, put forward in place of any number of energy storage and delivery configurations that should already be in place by 2022. It’s as if the only way to keep the lights on is to kill the very thing that has literally fed and sustained life in this Valley for millennia.

If you are lucky, you literally get one second-chance a century to conserve, protect and enforce the environmental protections left endlessly unattended on New England’s Great River. Like so many people in the Connecticut River Valley, I would never be the person who would turn their back on restoring this region’s critical ecosystem artery after a half century. That wholesale slaughter has come entirely at the hands of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project.

The Connecticut is a river without a bona fide protector, one with not even an NGO who can say they employ a single staff lawyer after 70 years of watershed council/conservancy window dressing. That’s what has left this ecosystem in tatters for generations. The corporations and the environmental agencies have never had a single thing to fear as the half century disaster rolled along….

Right now, the Connecticut River’s survival as this ecosystem’s most vital organ rests in their hands. It’s way past time our public trust agency leaders actually walked the talk. It’s time for them to stand up for the River’s life, and for those who come later. Here are their names. Use them, publicly. No river should die in the dark. They are being mentioned in Letters to the Editor, and No License to Kill filings with FERC:
Wendi Weber, Director Region 5 US Fish & Wildlife Service, wendi_weber@fws.gov; Martin Suuberg, Commissioner of MA Dept. of Environmental Protection; Mark Tisa, Director of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, mark.tisa@state.ma.us; Julie Crocker, NOAA/National Marine Fisheries ecosystems and energy branch chief, julie.crocker@noaa.gov,

And, finally, and once more–time is short in this relicensing process. FirstLight is again making claims they will have the fed/state agencies bought and sold in their secret, backroom license negotiations by March 15th. However unlikely, it is still time to keep up the pressure NOW! If you haven’t, or know someone who can, get them to take public action with FERC and the leaders noted above.

Again, here’s the NO License to Kill filing process for FERC–please share it, get someone to write, write a new letter yourself, NOW!

Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

And thanks to all, or almost all–because this is hardly a complete list of those who have written FERC or op eds, or letters, or shown up on bridges and made signs. We’re still in the game! Think, if you can, of doing something NOW, a letter, asking a friend. Something that pushes this River’s life out of the backroom shadows and into the light. There is only NOW! RIGHT NOW!

Joseph W Stubblefield, Sanjay Arwade, Jonathan S Shefftz, Jamie Rowen, Michael Giles, William H. Pete, Nicholas Reich, James Lowenthal, Katharine Sims, William Daniels, Paige Wilder, Karl Meyer, Shayla G Freeland, Mary J Metzger, Robert Arbib, C Grecsek, Malcolm G Everett, Mike Cournyn, Robert Catlin, Don Ogden, William N. Ryan, Elizabeth Whitcomb, Judith Nietsche, Celt Grant, Susan Olmsted, David B. Keith, Glen Ayers, Virginia Hastings, Annie Chappell, James Seretta, Ron Barto, Robert Dickerman, Pamela Scott, Tanya Dragan, Lin Respess, Rebecca Tippens, Sigurd Nilsen, Peggy Matthews-Nilsen, Amy Rose, Steven Wilkinson, Stephen Kerr, Nancy Obertz, Dorothy McIver, Robert Sweener, Seth Wilpan, Norma Roche, Fergus Marshall, Louise P. Doud, Vicki Citron, John Nelson Jr., Jon Burgess, Robert F Porzio, Garrett D Connelly, Dave Dersham, Betsy Corner, Graham Hayward, Sid Siff, Paul Richmond, Betsy Browning, Rebecca Robbins, James Smethurst, Laura Doughty, Mary Hall, Laura Kaye, Frank Ribeiro, Andrew Hutchison, Mark Russo, Judith Phillips, Priscilla Lynch, Molly Freeland, John Hoffman, Roberta Murphy, Dodi Melnicoff, Ethel S. White.

“No license to kill”: citizens defend the Connecticut River at its ecosystem graveyard—Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station

Posted by on 06 Feb 2022 | Tagged as: Connecticut River, Connecticut River blog, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River Refuge, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Delaware LLC, E-Comments, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FERC license, FirstLight, fish kill on the Connecticut, Great River Hydro, Greenfield Recorder, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, Nation's best landscaped sewer, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, NMFS, no license to kill, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, PSP Investments, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Greenfield Recorder, The Recorder, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Vermont

In an unrelenting drumbeat of filings to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, citizens throughout the Connecticut Valley are demanding that no new license be issued to Canada-owned FirstLight for their Delaware-tax-sheltered Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station here in Massachusetts.

https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-gyorgy-FirstLightLicensing-44862677

Please read the excellent opinion piece ABOVE from last week’s Greenfield Recorder by Anna Gyorgy, then continue further BELOW to read the latest group of on-the-record citizen filings to FERC insisting that a new license to kill be denied at Northfield Mountain for this venture capital outfit. KEY EXCERPTS from the most recent CORPORATE filings to FERC can be found at the end of this post.

IN THE LATEST INDICATION of the strength of opposition to a new Northfield license FirstLight just missed another self-targeted deadline to have its secret license negotiations with US Fish & Wildlife, MA Dept. of Environmental Protection, MA Division of Fish & Wildlife and the National Marine Fisheres Service all buttoned up and ready to send off for FERC approval.

IN THEIR LENGTHENING FAILURE to put the last nails in this four-state ecosystem’s river-reversing, fish-killing coffin, FL was forced to request “that the Commission continue to defer issuance of its Ready for Environmental Analysis (REA) Notice until after February 28, 2022. FirstLight anticipates requesting the Commission to further defer the REA Notice until after June 30, 2022, to allow the parties time to negotiate a comprehensive, binding settlement agreement that aims to fully resolve all relicensing issues.

THOUGH THIS MAY APPEAR to be merely yet another of FirstLight’s series of month-long delay requests–it’s actually admitting they’ll likely not have this thing safely in their Delaware-registered tax bag until July of 2022 or LATER. What it really says is that they foresee stumbling blocks to getting agreement on allowing the impacts of this river-killer with the public agencies charged with protecting the Connecticut River ecosystem. It’s being negotiated on their watch. They are responsible for defending our so-called, “S.O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge,” our ‘only’ “National Blueway”–and what remains today our drop-dead-deadly, ‘nation’s best landscaped sewer’ right here in Massachusetts.

It is the PEOPLES’ voices that are doing this by writing and filing with FERC:
Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

This is THE PUBLIC’S RIVER! It deserves to LIVE. And, it deserves a real WATCHDOG– YOU!! Thanks to all for raising your voices.

ALSO, this new podcast with OCCUPY THE AIRWAVES on Valley Free Radio:
https://archive.org/details/occupy-the-airwaves-1.17.2022-karl-meyer

BELOW are the latest citizen filings with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission:

Document Accession #: 20220207-5017 Filed Date: 02/07/2022
Pat Graves, South Deerfield, MA.

Many things have changed in recent years. I urge that no relicensing of
FirstLight’s Northfield Mt. Pumped Storage Station take place without
careful consideration of the benefits and harms. At this time it appears
that the harms far outweigh the benefits.

Document Accession #: 20220207-5014 Filed Date: 02/07/2022
Anne Naughton, Shelburne Fls, MA.

Hello,
Please DO NOT renew Firstlight’s lease on the Northfield Mountain Pumped
Storage Project, P-2485.

The Connecticut River is not replaceable. We can get electricity from other,
less destructive sources.

Sincerely,
Anne Naughton
Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts

Document Accession #: 20220204-5174 Filed Date: 02/04/2022
Wayne Pleasant, Turners Falls, MA.
Feb 4, 2022
REF: P-2485 FirstLight vs River Wildlife

Dear FERC
Please deny the license for the Northfield pumped storage system. I have lived on the CT river all my life and have seen first hand the incredible damage that they do to our river.

The system is not “Green Energy.” It consumes more energy that it produces. It is only used for making more money for FirstLight and not to benefit consumers and the environment. It severely damages the shoreline by raising and lowering the water level and thus associated wildlife.

It causes unnatural waterflows that damages and compromises the river environment for endangered Short Nosed Sturgeon.

Sucks up and kills large and small fish through its turbines. No proposed net will stop small fish and associated eggs from being sucked up and killed.

NOTE: If I were to kill this many fish every day I would be arrested for violating protected species rules.

Please do not issue a license to this facility to kill more wildlife.

Thank you,
Wayne
(** NEW filings continue below **)

Document Accession #: 20220204-5027 Filed Date: 02/04/2022
James Terapane, South Deerfield, MA.

I am writing regarding P-2485 Northfield Pump Storage re-licensing process. First off, I am, with many other local citizens, opposed to re-licensing this facility as it currently operates. The disruption of the CT. River ecosystem that this and other First Light Hydro facilities create is
unacceptable.

I demand that FERC allow for public comment as required by Massachusetts DEP review of the re-licensing so that all information related to this process be presented to the public and the citizens of United States be heard. Let’s not forget that First Light is a foreign owned entity whose interests are not necessarily in line with ours, the American Citizens who’s river resources are being borrowed for profit.

We citizens of the Connecticut Valley have worked hard to protect and use our rivers in a sustainable manner and will continue to do so. The idea of the facility being used as a “battery” is a clever pitch but we don’t buy it, not at the cost of the continuing destruction the river ecology. Please don’t cloak this crude way of using the river as “Green”. What is being done to our river is anything but Green Thinking.

Now is the time for bold solutions that secure a reliable power source AND protect our environment. I urge First Light Company, if they must have their battery, to use what ever innovative brain power they have in their company to solve this problem of river and fish destruction otherwise you are not welcome to use our resources.

The people of this region have brought forth many innovative problem solving ideas and pioneered the American Hydro power industry so I urge the managers of First Light to step up to the plate and address how to solve this problem. If they don’t have any ideas we can help them out.

Document Accession #: 20220204-5025 Filed Date: 02/04/2022
Wendy Sibbison, Greenfield, MA.

I oppose the relicensing of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Hydro Storage Station because its immediate and long-lasting harm to the ecology of the river and to its living inhabitants outweigh “both in ethical and economic terms” any benefit to the public of FirstLight’s plan to transport and store energy, far from its source, for later generation at a net energy loss.

AND BELOW ARE DIRECT EXCERPTS FROM FirstLight’s most recent filing with FERC, and–further below that, from Great River Hydro’s filing noting that it is being held back in their relicensing of their non-lethal, Vermont river facilities due to the successive delays requested by PSP Investments-owned, FirstLight at Northfield.

Document Accession #: 20220131-5365 Filed Date: 01/31/2022
Alan Douglass Regulatory Compliance Manager

“FirstLight continues to discuss fish passage, minimum stream flows, and project operational issues with federal and state resource agencies, and certain non-governmental organizations. FirstLight and the agencies have reached conceptual agreement on minimum stream flows, upstream and downstream fish passage facilities, and certain operational measures. The parties are continuing to make progress on the remaining operational measures, at which time they intend to execute an AIP.”

“In light of the significant progress of FirstLight and the relicensing participants in achieving conceptual agreements, FirstLight requests that the Commission continue to defer issuance of its Ready for Environmental Analysis (REA) Notice until after February 28, 2022. FirstLight anticipates requesting the Commission to further defer the REA Notice until after June 30, 2022, to allow the parties time to negotiate a comprehensive, binding settlement agreement that aims to fully resolve all relicensing issues.”

Alan Douglass
Regulatory Compliance Manager

Great River Hydro’s VERNON DAM facilities and its non-lethal fish passage for migrating fish in New Hampshire and Vermont.

BELOW, is text excerpted from GRH’s FERC filing:

Document Accession #: 20220203-5098 Filed Date: 02/03/2022
John L. Ragonese
FERC License Manager
Great River Hydro, LLC

“In the most recent status report, FirstLight Licensees announced conceptual agreements with a number of relicensing participants on several key issues and that they were close to reaching agreement on other key issues. The filing asks the Commission to further defer issuance of the REA Notice until after February 28, 2022, to allow relicensing stakeholders to reach agreements in principle. It also suggests that they intend to request the Commission further delay issuance of the REA Notice until after June 30, 2022, to allow for the development of a binding settlement agreement that the parties. GRH anticipates the Commission would reasonably hold off issuing the REA Notice for at least six months, in order to consider an executed settlement agreement between FirstLight Licensees and stakeholders as a preferred alternative in an amended application.”

“At this point in the process, however, there is no reason for the Commission not to issue the REA Notice for the GRH Projects. Even if the Commission further defers the REA Notice for the FirstLight Projects for another six months, it can still prepare a multi-project environmental impact statement for all five projects.”

“GRH has consulted with federal and state fishery and water quality agencies, and we are authorized to state their support GRH’s request for the Commission to move forward.”

Sincerely,
John L. Ragonese
FERC License Manager

As Connecticut River secrecy-shrouded talks continue, citizens demand an end to Northfield’s half century of devastation

Posted by on 22 Dec 2021 | Tagged as: American shad, blueback herring, Connecticut River ecosystem, Daily Hampshire Gazette, Deerfield MA, E-Comments, Extinction, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FERC license, FirstLight, Greenfield Recorder, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Massachusetts DEP, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, pumped storage, shad, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Daily Hampshire Gazette, The Greenfield Recorder, The Recorder, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS

As secrecy-shrouded Connecticut River licensing talks continue, citizens are standing up to demand an end Northfield’s half century of ecosystem devastation

IN THE PAST THREE DAYS a steady drumbeat of on-the-record calls to end Northfield Mountain’s half century of aquatic carnage, energy waste and ecosystem disruption have been filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This speaks volumes about democracy vs. secrecy–and the massive void in leadership, information and environmental enforcement that has been the status quo on this great river for the last 50 years. When there is no watchdog; there is no enforcement.

IN THE FOLLOWING ENTRIES you will find the latest 10 filings by citizens from Foxboro to Amherst, and Northampton, Leeds and Northfield, as well as from Greenfield and Deerfield to Colrain, into the FERC record. All are demanding that no new license be issued allowing the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station to continue savaging our ecosystem.

AFTER reading through that last entry you will find directions for entering on-the-record testimony with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. It is important that this is done now, as state and federal fish and environmental agencies are currently in FINAL “settlement” negotiations with foreign-registered FirstLight through the end of this month. THEY NEED TO KNOW exactly where you–their constituents, stand on any selling out of our Great River and its aquatic legacy.

* * The following piece, “Last light for New England’s Great River?” appeared in the Daily Hampshire Gazette on 12/22/2021, after originally running in The Greenfield Recorder on Tuesday, 12/21/2021. https://www.gazettenet.com/my-turn-meyer-LastLightCtRiver-44127152

BELOW please find the latest citizen filings with FERC:

UPDATE! This is the ELEVENTH filing, submitted from Stoughton MA early this morning:

Document Accession #: 20211223-5001 Filed Date: 12/23/2021
Steven Wilkinson, Stoughton, MA.

It’s time for F.E.R.C. to fulfill government by, of and for the people, and not the corporations, by stopping the mis-use of our public resources. Restore the Connecticut River’s integrity by ending Northfield’s activities. You owe it to future generations, whose environment and food supply are being adversely impacted by your past decisions. Make it right. Stop this backward company from hurting New England.

Document Accession #: 20211223-5000 Filed Date: 12/23/2021
Amy Rose, Amherst, MA.

Comments on Northfield Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings P-2485
I stand firmly in favor of terminating the license of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station. It is an experiment that has failed miserably, and it is time to close it down. In addition to killing 100s of millions of aquatic animals in the CT River every year, this illogical project squanders a massive amount of energy pumping water to the top of a mountain. How
absurd! Protect our beautiful CT River and stop this ridiculous project ASAP.Redirect this energy towards investing in solar arrays on developed areas: rooftops, roads and parking lots.

Document Accession #: 20211222-5071 Filed Date: 12/22/2021
Peggy Matthews-Nilsen, Amherst, MA.

Please protect the Connecticut River from the environmental damage that FirstLight’s project will create for decades to come. Please DO NOT relicense FirstLight! Thank you.

Document Accession #: 20211222-5067 Filed Date: 12/22/2021
Sigurd Nilsen, Amherst, MA.

Please do not renew FirstLight’s license due to the ecological devastation to the Connecticut River.

Document Accession #: 20211222-5057 Filed Date: 12/22/2021
Rebecca Tippens, colrain, MA.

Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings
I am quite upset that the process for deciding whether to renew the license for First Light to renew permission for pumped storage has been less than fully transparent. The Connecticut RIVER is a common resource and it is our obligation to insure its health as well as the beings who live in it. We know we are facing an extinction crisis and the pumped storage method, despite assurances to the contrary, kills millions of fish. First Light’s parent owner has been using all the tricks in the book to hide from both regulators and the public, their financial sleuthing that includes relocating their business to tax havens while, green washing their actions to give donations to local non-profits that represent but fractions of their profits but which they use to bolster their argument that they are indeed a green company.

In fact the process of sucking out water to later drop it to create energy (& dead fish), is massively energy intensive. That they want to continue this killing project for the next twenty plus years is beyond abhorrent. It is a moral and ecological travesty that no one should be supporting.

Document Accession #: 20211222-5050 Filed Date: 12/22/2021
Lin Respess, Northampton, MA.

I am writing to encourage you to reject the relicensing of FirstLight’s Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage station on the Connecticut River. For years, it has been destroying migratory fishes on the river in direct violation of the U.S, Fish & Wildlife Service’s published goals for the river, and to restore passage for migratory American shad, blueback herring, and other species, and requiring providing the public with high quality sport fishing opportunities in a highly urbanized area, as well as to provide for the long-term needs of the population for seafood. Please protect this New England ecosystem for future generations by denying relicensing for FirstLight’s Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station.

With thanks,
Lin & Tucker Respess, Northampton, Massachusetts

Document Accession #: 20211222-5040 Filed Date: 12/22/2021
Tanya Dragan, LEEDS, MA.

Hello,
I am gravely concerned about FirstLight and the damage caused by the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station on the Connecticut River.

Please do not allow this to continue. Nor continue with the negative impacts they’ve gotten away with for decades. We need to protect future generations.

Do not let their PR/lobbying machine work to ruin the environment.

Regards,
Tanya Dragan
Leeds, MA

Document Accession #: 20211222-5039 Filed Date: 12/22/2021
Pamela Scott, Deerfield, MA.

To whom it concerns.. I read with dismay the plans for this hydro electric project to continue. As a concerned citizen, I urge you to reconsider. These activities will have lasting effects that we can’t even comprehend and will affect us far into the future. Please discontinue this project and stop the senseless slaughter of precious wildlife. Thank you very much for your attention to this email.

Document Accession #: 20211221-5154 Filed Date: 12/21/2021
Ron Bartos, FOXBORO, MA.

The operation of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station facility is highly detrimental to all life in and around the Connecticut River. It kills millions of the river’s aquatic creatures whenever it operates, and causes an unnatural rise and fall, and reverse current, in the river. The license for the project must not be renewed. There are other more economical and ecological ways to generate electricity.

Document Accession #: 20211221-5127 Filed Date: 12/21/2021
James Seretta, Greenfield, MA.

It makes NO SENSE to allow any company to control a resource that in doing so allows them to make money while killing off the ecosystem of the resource. It would be different if there was no harm right?

What’s most bothersome is how it looks like you’re in bed with these guys. What’s in it for you?? Have you bothered to watch these guys sneak around with their shell companies covering their tracks? Did you ever try to figure out why?? Why sell out to a foreign company that has no interest but to make a profit while pilfering the resource of the home community??

It’s time for you guys to do your job and stand up for this incredible resource. Do you hear an outcry that says these corporate folks are doing great things, we love them, sign them up for another 50 years? Of course not because no one wants it. THE HARM OUTWEIGHS THE GOOD!!! DO YOUR JOB!

Document Accession #: 20211220-5002 Filed Date: 12/20/2021
Glen Ayers, Greenfield, MA.

The Northfield Mountain pump-storage facility should be completely decommissioned and the river restored to allow natural flows. No connectionbetween the Northfield Mountain facility and the CT River should be allowed. This river-killing contraption must be eliminated from the river ecosystem. This continuous destruction has been happening for 50-years and it cannot be allowed to kill the river’s aquatic life for another 50.

The time has come to pull the plug on Northfield Mountain, an outdated, obsolete technology that wastes energy, kills fish and other aquatic organisms, and is only operated to enhance the profit of a corporate investment entity that simply does not care about ecology or the river. The people demand that the Government stop this abuse at once. After 50-years of raping the river on a daily basis, it is time to say enough is enough! DO NOT RELICENSE NORTHFIELD MOUNTAIN PUMP STORAGE!!

Fifty years ago this now-obsolete contraption was foisted upon the river aspart of the Vermont Yankee Atomic Nuke Facility in Vernon, VT. That polluting monstrosity has finally been shut down, but is still contaminating the river ecosystem. Northfield Mountain is no longer connected to the Nuke and it should have been shut down at the same time, but the license has expired and it finally must be shuttered so that the river can begin to recover from 50-years of abuse. Ecological science has developed greatly in the past 50-years, and technological advances have replaced this sort of monstrosity with systems that are more efficient, far less harmful, and have barely a fraction of the footprint that the river destroying Northfield Mountain has on the local ecology. This antique belongs in a museum, as an exhibit on bad ideas that were finally eliminated, like DDT, Thalidomide, and Teflon. There is nothing good about Northfield Mountain, it is a curse on the region, and the damage it has done to the river will take decades to heal. River recovery is not possible until this beast is shut down. The river demands that it be freed from the death grip that has been strangling the life out of the CT River for half a century. The abuse must be stopped. NOW!

I implore you to do your job, and find the spine necessary to shut downNorthfield Mountain. To do otherwise would be inhuman and a gross violation of the public trust doctrine. I ask that you reject the application from First Light Power, deny the relicensing, and require that the owner of Northfield Mountain restore the river ecosystem and functioning that has been ruined by their mistreatment of a living system for these past 50-years. The public has spoken loud and clear, we do not consent to treating our river as a pumping machine for the next half century. We Do Not Consent! Shut Down Northfield Mountain! Shut it down.

HELP RESCUE OUR ECOSYSTEM: Here’s how…

Citizens can still get on the public record before any grim deal is signed. Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

Police action threatened at US Fish & Wildlife HQ as constituents try to deliver letters

Posted by on 01 Dec 2021 | Tagged as: Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Connecticut River Refuge, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, FERC licensing process, FirstLight, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Department of Energy and Environmental Affairs, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, migratory fish, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, Public Sector Pension Investments, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Wendi Weber, WWLP TV Channel 22 News

Police action threatened at US Fish & Wildlife HQ as constituents tried to deliver letters on Tuesday, November 30, 2021

A cold, socially-distanced public welcome at USFWS Headquaters in Hadley for visiting citizens as security guard reaches to phone police. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

SEE also, this Recorder article by Chris Larabee, here also featured in the Gazette: https://www.gazettenet.com/Two-make-20-mile-hike-to-protest-FirstLight-s-potential-relicensing-43803954

HADLEY MA. A security guard at Hadley’s US Fish and Wildlife Headquarters threatened to call police on Karl Meyer of Greenfield and Dave Dersham of Northampton and a handful of their supporters after completing a 20 mile protest walk to the facility at around 4 pm Tuesday. The two were interviewed by the Recorder and WWLP TV Channel 22 News along the route. Their trek from Greenfield to Hadley was made to call attention to a final, closed-door license “settlement” negotiation scheduled by Canada-owned FirstLight with the US Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries, and MA Division of Fish and Wildlife for Thursday, December 2nd. FirstLight wants the agencies to sign-off on a final deal in the 9 year-old Federal Energy Regulatory Commission process relicensing the massive suctioning of the Connecticut River at their 49 year old Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station.

Banner on federal relicensing of Northfield Mountain displayed at USFWS HQ. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The duo and three other citizens including a 14 year-old and an infant, were quickly denied entrance during regular business hours as they attempted to deliver notes and letters to USFWS Regional Director Wendi Weber. A security guard sitting behind a front lobby window tersely told them their letters, in an open manila envelope, would not be accepted at the public HQ. When they made further inquiry the guard became defensive, without offering alternatives, and then escalated the situation by demanding no picture taking was allowed and they leave the lobby or “I will call the police.” Asking why, the guard offered no further discussion, instead repeating the police threat and then dialing a phone where visitors heard her request that Hadley police cruiser be dispatched.

One of the messages constituents wanted to convey to USFWS Director Wendi Weber. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

At that point the visitors left the lobby with their letters, and continued their discussions in front of the unwelcoming Headquarters building. The group, also supported earlier in the day by a dozen protesters who’d met the two walkers on the Sunderland Bridge, were completing trip by collecting handwritten messages for Weber from the public. All were being sent to highlight the obliteration the 100’s of millions of eggs and young-of-the year migratory and resident fish killed by Northfield giant turbines annually. They are asking USFWS representatives to deny FirstLight’s license proposal of placing a temporary “barrier” net, with ¾ inch mesh, in front of NMPS for a few months each year. They say FL’s “safety net” will be patently ineffectual in preventing the long-standing annual carnage to Connecticut River fish populations in the heart of the ecosystem and S.O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge.

Supporters standing, post-ejection, in front of USFWS Headquarter. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

After several more minutes standing in the cold and talking in front of the headquarters Anne Sittauer, a USFWS Refuge Supervisor, was sent outside to speak to the group, now totaling eight. Sittauer stated the Region 5 Director was busy, but she would accept the letters on Weber’s behalf, giving assurances they’d reach her. No squad car ever arrived and no arrests took place among the peaceful visitors, after being threatened, denied entrance and receiving a patently-shabby un welcome at the facility. Surely it was an eye-opening public interaction for the teenager, the grandmother, and the handful of other citizens asking federal representatives to honor their public trust by protecting the public’s fish—fish being annually obliterated for the last 49 years in the heart of today’s S.O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge—one of only two of 568 national refuge’s with “fish” specifically in its title.

Connecticut River blog: Connecticut River stand up September 18

Posted by on 16 Sep 2021 | Tagged as: American shad, Buz Eisenberg, Clean Water Act, cleanup, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, ESA, fish kill on the Connecticut, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, pumped storage, river cleanup, shad larvae, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, Turner Falls Canal annual draining, WHMP

WHY anyone might choose stand out on the Turners Falls Gill-Montague Bridge over the Connecticut River on Saturday, September 18, 2021, 11 a.m – noon… * ALSO, new WHMP interview with Buz Eisenberg linked below *

dead juvenile Connecticut River shad… Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

PICTURED ABOVE are dead juvenile America shad–easily 150 of them. These are Connecticut River migratory fish that had been lucky enough to escape the treachery of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, just seven miles upriver. There, annually, it’s killer death toll for juvenile shad alone can hit the 2 million mark. So picture a scene like the one above, but multiply it by 100,000 or 200,000, and you start to get a picture of the invisible slaughter that’s never been cleaned up on the Connecticut. Sadly, these hapless juveniles were on their way to the sea when they met their demise in the Turners Falls Power Canal. They died just 300 yards from the dissolving riverbanks of the actual Connecticut River and the desecrated spawning habitat of the federally endangered shortnose sturgeon. Yet more responsibilities and laws flaunted and ignored.

NOTE:There are crucial times when the public has to do the job left undone for a half century after the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act became the law of the land on the Connecticut River. It’s a half dead river carcass in so many ways–a watercourse that does not even meet the definition of a living river in Massachusetts.

Just ask yourself: ON WHOSE WATCH DID THIS OCCUR??

This is a river that’s gone 50 years without a defender. A four-state US Fish & Wildlife Refuge without a single full-time, or part-time staff lawyer dedicated to its daily defense for half a century. The federal and state agencies responsible failed to protect it–and no one held their feet to the fire.

That’s how rivers die. They wither for decades under umbrella organizations that shun and deflect the bedrock necessity to accept a MISSION mandate to INVESTIGATE, ENFORCE and PROSECUTE.

We have a textbook case here:
Where there is no WATCHDOG,there is no ENFORCEMENT.

That’s why someone might choose to stand up for their river on the Turners Falls Bridge on Saturday, Sept. 18, at 11:00. It’s because NO RIVER SHOULD DIE IN THE DARK.

LINKS BELOW:
https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-meyer-StandUpforNERiver-42357321

https://whmp.com/podcasts/the-afternoon-buzz-9-16-21/

ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE NOW:

If you think the Connecticut River ecosystem should be survivable for fish and aquatic animals in all four states–and that New England’s River should meet the basic definition of a living river in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts… Then, DEMAND of these agencies and officials that any new FERC license for the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station (FERC Project # 2485) meet all the requirements of the Clean Water Act, the Rivers and Harbors Act, and all state and federal wetlands protection laws—for the Connecticut River, including safe fish passage mandated in the 1872 Supreme Court decision Holyoke Company v. Lyman. Make them hear you. Name names. Demand the cleanup of a river left comatose for half a century. It is OWED to coming generations.

(*Lots of relicensing and river information and issues notes at www.karlmeyerwriting.com/blog/ )

HERE ARE THE AGENCIES AND NAMES of those responsible for protecting the river ecosystem for future generations. Name them. Write them, then forward that letter to your Congress person and state representative–as well as the local paper. Name names. Let them know you are watching and expect them to do their duty. Finally, send your notes to FERC, using www.ferc.gov. Go to E-comments, make sure you give your name and address and specifically mention “Northfield Mountain, P-2485” when you write. That is the FERC docket number, and it’s required. BUT, mostly, say their names in public–they are working for us. IT WILL BE THEIR LEGACY TOO

ENERGY executives in the private/quasi-public sphere:

Mr. Gordon van Welie, President and CEO, ISO-New England, the “independent” system operator: Phone (413) 540-4220

Mr. Peter Brandien, Vice President of System Operations, ISO-New England:
E-mail: pbrandien@iso-ne.com. NOTE: Mr. Brandien writes the annual support letter that facilitates the daily commercial damage to the Connecticut wrought by the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project.

FEDERAL PUBLIC officials:

For endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, freshwater mussels, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eel: Ms. Donna Wieting, Director of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA Fisheries: Phone: 301-427-8400

Also, for endangered shortnose sturgeon, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eels: Mr. Sean Mcdermott, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:
E-mail: Sean.mcdermott@noaa.gov

Also at NMFS, protecting shortnose sturgeon and their habitat: Ms. Julie Crocker, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:
E-mail: Julie.crocker@noaa.gov

For federal protection and enforcement of the Clean Water Act on the Connecticut River:
Mr. Timothy L. Timmermann Office of Environmental Review, EPA New England Region 1, Boston MA 02109-3912:
E-mail: timmermann.timothy@epa.gov

For all migratory fish and safe passage on the river including American shad, herring, and endangered sturgeon:
Ms. Wendi Weber, US Fish & Wildlife Service Region 5, Hadley MA 01035: E-mail: wendi_weber@usfws.gov

MASSACHUSETTS state officials:

Ms. Kathleen Theoharides, Secretary of the MA Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs 100 Cambridge St., Suite 900, Boston, MA 02114:
Main Phone at (617) 626-1000

For Massachusetts clean water and wetland habitat protections on the Connecticut:
Mr. Brian Harrington, Bureau of Water Resources Deputy Regional Director, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight Street, Springfield MA 01103:
E-mail: Brian.d.harrington@state.ma.us

Also from MA DEP: Mr. David Cameron, PWS Section Chief, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight St., Springfield, MA 01103:
E-mail: David.cameron@state.ma.us

For state-endangered shortnose sturgeon and all Connecticut River migratory fish in MA:
Mr. Jesse Leddick, Chief of Regulatory Review, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:
E-mail: Jesse.Leddick@mass.gov

Also at MA Div. of Fish & Wildlife: Mr. Steven Mattocks, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, Fisheries, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:
E-mail: steven.mattocks.@mass.gov

Rock Dam: the Connecticut River’s shortnose sturgeon “bakery”

Posted by on 03 Jun 2021 | Tagged as: Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Daily Hampshire Gazette, Rock Dam, The Recorder, vtdigger.org

The first link below is from an interview I did with Don Ogden(d.o.) and Glen Ayers on the EnviroShow, which aired this week.

Further down are links to The Recorder, vtdigger, and the Daily Hampshire Gazette, where a satirical piece on the abandonment of the most critical biological habitat in this river ecosystem, which also ran this past week.

This is a model that has failed, dismally.

https://archive.org/details/the-rock-dam-enviro-show-6-1-21


The Rock Dam’s drained and baking cobbles: killing field for the eggs and Early Life Stages (ELS) of the federally endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

Sometimes you have to laugh to keep from crying… See links below:

https://archive.org/details/the-rock-dam-enviro-show-6-1-21https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-meyer-LocalDelicacy-40676082

https://vtdigger.org/2021/06/02/karl-meyer-rare-downstream-dining-baby-baked-endangered-sturgeon/

https://www.gazettenet.com/my-turn-meyer-LocalDelicacy-40767302

The Connecticut River at Earth Day 2021

Posted by on 22 Apr 2021 | Tagged as: Connecticut River ecosystem, Earth Day 2021, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, vtdigger.org, wrsi.com

Below are links to a podcast and recent op eds that appeared in the Recorder, Gazette, and VTdigger.org. The podcast is also an invite to this Saturday’s Great Walk for River Survival, through the French King Gorge.

Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

https://wrsi.com/monte/an-earth-week-walk-for-river-justice-surival/

https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-meyer-EarthDayAndARiver-LicenseToKill-40056122#lg=1&slide=0

https://www.gazettenet.com/Guest-columnist-Karl-Meyer-40061119

https://vtdigger.org/2021/04/18/karl-meyer-why-renew-a-federal-license-to-continue-killing-a-river/

The first picture above was taken at the Rock Dam in Turners Falls, showing the failing Connecticut River banks there on 4/21/2021–which slough down into the Rock Dam pool, the only documented natural spawning site for the federally endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon. The second photo from this Earth Day Eve, below, shows several people walking along the exposed cobbles of that habitat, just 150 feet from the orange puss running from those banks. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

This last picture looks down toward the suction tunnels on the River at Northfield on September 6, 2010.

Photo Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

The huge apparatus shown there heading out into the river constitutes the massive dredging operation FirstLight was ordered to undertake by the EPA after dumping thousands of tons of silt and muck directly into the river for over 90 straight days. Northfield created its own instant disaster, and it remained sanctioned and inoperable for over half a year. Shad passage on our quieted ecosystem at Turners Falls Dam jumped 800% over the previous decade’s average, and the power grid held together just fine
without Northfield Mountain’s deadly, fish-crushing, daily suck-and-surge regime.

A Connecticut River return to the bad old days?

Posted by on 18 Oct 2020 | Tagged as: American shad, Cabot Woods, Clean Water Act, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Conservancy, Connecticut River riverbank failure, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Endangered Species Act, Eversource, Farmington River, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, Greenfield Community College, Northeast Utilities, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, pumped storage, Relicensing, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, Society of Environmental Journalists, Source to Sea Cleanup, The Recorder, The Revelator, Turners Falls, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, Uncategorized, US Geological Survey's Conte Fish Lab, Vermont Digger, Vernon Dam Fishway

The riverbanks at Rock Dam
Photo
Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

Note: the following piece appeared recently in VTDigger, www.vtdigger.org, https://vtdigger.org/2020/10/18/karl-meyer-a-connecticut-river-return-to-the-bad-old-days/ and in the The Recorder, www.recorder.com, (no story link posted)

                        A Connecticut River return to the bad old days?

Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer All rights reserved

On September 1st, FirstLight Power petitioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for a 3rd delay in submitting final license applications to run Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station and their Turners Falls hydro sites in Massachusetts. In a process now in its 9th year, the Canadian-owned company wants 4 more months to restudy NMPS’s water release impacts on endangered tiger beetles 30 miles downstream. It was bad news capping a dismal year for a Connecticut River that’s not seen any semblance of natural flows in the Bay State for half a century.

Despite recent on-air, print and social media stories of cleanup heroism, secret swimming holes, baby lamprey rescue and adult lamprey barbecues, our river seems headed back toward its time as “the nation’s best landscaped sewer.”

In August hundreds of thousands of gallons of raw sewage overflows enter its main stem, fouling it from Springfield to Middletown CT. In June, for the second time in a year, toxic PFAS entered waterways at Bradley Airport triggering fish consumption warnings and menacing water supplies on the Farmington all the way to its meeting with the Connecticut. A year ago–almost exactly 19 years after a factory spill killed thousands of North River fish, that grizzly Colrain kill was replicated when sulfuric acid again flowed from that site into that same tributary. 

In Vermont this year structural problems at Vernon Dam likely led to the big downturn in American shad reaching central New England. At Vernon this spring structural problems at that fishway likely led to the big downturn in American shad passing upstream there to central New England. The partial blockage might have been caught–and repaired, had two students downriver at Greenfield Community College fulfilled their weekly fish counting obligations. Important tallying, via downloaded video, just didn’t happen–leaving the problem at Vernon Dam undetected for a full migration season.

Meanwhile in Turners Falls riverbanks were collapsing—some oozing grim puss that’s leaching to the most endangered habitat in the ecosystem. The Rock Dam is an in-river ledge that’s provided refuge to federally endangered shortnose sturgeon for centuries. It’s their sole documented natural spawning site. Pink-orange slurry has been flushing from the banks there for a year–running into the river’s cobble bed where early life stage sturgeon shelter and develop.

A red slurry enters the Connecticut at the Rock Dam
Photo
Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

Visitors to the river at Rock Dam off “Migratory Way” in Cabot Woods will see a 30 foot hemlock and saplings being eaten by a sinkhole now big enough for a Mini-Cooper. Banks there slump to a series of nasty, yards-wide, gashes—one with a dumped tire in its center. Slime squeezing from them sloughs in weeping riverlets that flow the final few yards to the river’s sturgeon nursery as a rusty precipitate of oxidizing iron, manganese and other unknown agents. In a drought year, the adjacent muck-choked canal is clearly the destabilizing water source.

Upriver failing FirstLight banks are threatening Millers Falls Road and houses on a buff there. Pipe failure is said to be a culprit. The town made expensive repairs, dumping rubble on that hillside at a sharp river curve called The Narrows. Failures at such nearby sites might merit closer examination. The Narrows is where current pushes against the outer riverbanks–a classic place for surging water to create erosional impact. Northfield Mountain creates big suck-and-surge cycles just 4 miles upstream–sending down powerful pulses that cause daily 3 foot “tides” at Turners Falls Dam. Some can reach 9 feet.

NMPS was completed in 1972 by Northeast Utilities. Rebranded as Eversource and now expanding into natural gas, they are still New England’s grid monopoly and perennial major sponsor of the Source to Sea Cleanup. NMPS is a now 48 year-old FirstLight holding, but still sending its surges down the Narrows to that dam. There, they get shunted into the power canal, ultimately exerting pressure against its massively muck-choked outer bank–adjacent and just 400 feet from those dissolving banks at Rock Dam. Ironically, any flow the canal can’t swallow gets flushed over the dam in channel-ramping surges to the starved, oft-empty riverbed below. That parch-and-flood cycle further impacts Rock Dam’s shores; then heads to endangered Puritan tiger beetle habitat 30 miles away.

The muck-choked outer bank of the drawn-down Turner Falls power canal on Sept. 14, 2020 Photo Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

The US Geological Survey’s Conte Anadromous Fish Research Center sits 250 yards from Rock Dam. Shortnose sturgeon and their critical Rock Dam pool were extensively studied by their researchers there for decades. Now debased and failing, it is ignored. What about the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act? That lab sits on a bank opposite Greenfield, home to the 68 year-old, recently-rebranded Connecticut River Conservancy. Why isn’t CRC testing that Rock Dam slurry at their water lab? Have they sent any slime samples out for analysis? Where’s their Streambank Erosion Committee? Why would a federal lab abandon the long-term endangered species research site at its door?

As self-described champions of “Science for a Changing World” and “Healthy habitats,” neither has steered a reporter or video crew to that elephant in the room. Perhaps it’s their admission of powerlessness. CRC, dependent on various federal and state fish and environmental agencies for grant monies won’t likely be calling out their failures anytime soon. They have no enforcement mandate and employ no staff lawyers. Thus they never challenge the big dogs, and power companies know it.

If a river could talk I think it would say cleanups look nice, but they won’t save rivers. That requires an unencumbered 21st century organization—one with lawyers and an enforcement mandate corporations can’t ignore.

Next Page »