shad fishing

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Shad angling still good at Rock Dam Pool during minimum test flows

Posted by on 15 May 2015 | Tagged as: American shad, Connecticut River, Deerfield River, FERC licensing process, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, shad, shad fishing, Turners Falls, Turners Falls dam

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An angler pulling in a shad in the Rock Dam Pool on Friday, May 15, 2015. (CLICK TO ENLARGE)

On a slightly overcast late Friday morning the shad were still hitting for anglers at the Rock Dam Pool. Flow from the Turners Falls Dam into the Dead Reach remained at just 2500 cfs, which leaves much of the riverbed below the dam as just exposed, rocky cobble.

Down at the Rock Dam three anglers were doing pretty well, however. Within a minute, virtually, of my late morning arrival, I saw each hook a fish. Two bring theirs to shore; while one slips the hook at the water’s edge. The guy in hip waders gently unhooks his fish right at the water line and it splashes away. The other angler hauls in a shiny 22-inch shad and flops it on it’s side for keeping in three inches of stilled backwater.

I get down to business. “How’s it been?” I ask, approaching each, upstream to down. “Not bad,” says the first, and youngest guy. He’s been here maybe an hour and he’d just landed his first fish of the day. The middle guy, short and heavy set with white hair, now has three fish laid out in the shallow drink to carry home. He replies with halting English, but conveys that he’s had six total for the morning.

The guy in the waders–who I’ve now watched land and release two fish, describes the day’s angling as “Not bad.” He’s pulled in six–now seven, in the two hours he’s been here. “It’s better in the afternoons,” he offers, “The other day here I had twenty.”

I arrange an old brick for a seat on the sandy beach and enjoy their efforts and the beauty of the Rock Dam with a bit of flow coursing through it for a change. Across twenty minutes I see seven shad pulled from the waters circulating into its pool.

As I make my way back to the road another angler has just pulled up in a pick-up. “You heading down after shad?” I ask. His name is Jeffrey Smith. I’m guessing he’s maybe in his late-30s, and certainly a well-versed angler. He also fishes the Deerfield but was here yesterday casting for shad, “I had a dozen fish in an hour and a half.”

I explain a bit about the test flows and the federal relicensing that’s responsible for water in the Dead Reach here. We shake and exchange names as we head in opposite directions. “Good luck!” I call to him.

Fifteen minutes later I’m standing on a ledge near the Turners Falls Dam, looking down on three more fishermen. “Any luck?” I holler, catching one guy’s eye. “A little,” comes the unenthusiastic reply. “Well, I just came from Rock Dam and they’re hitting down there–they landed seven in about 20 minutes,” I tell him. “You know the Rock Dam?” He nods in the affirmative, then says something to his compadres. They begin packing up their gear.

Holyoke has been lifting shad since April 30th. They passed 13,000 on Wednesday, and 20,000 yesterday. This year’s total thus far at Holyoke is 214,091.

It takes just a few days for shad passing Holyoke to reach Turners Falls, 36 miles upstream. And over half those counted at Holyoke will attempt to pass this site to reach spawning waters in Vermont and New Hampshire. All that attempt to pass Turners Falls are steered out of the Connecticut River into the Turners Falls Power Canal.

Upon questioning, federal Conte Lab researchers who have been studying shad in the canal via power company subsidies for over a decade, revealed that shad spend an average of 8 days in the 2-1/2 mile long Turners Falls Power Canal–before making their way upstream to the “vicinity” of the dam–where they have one more ladder to thread at the Gatehouse before making it to open water. So it takes them more than a WEEK to travel 2-1/2 miles here, before they even make an approach. At best about 1-in-10 ever emerge upstream. A person can walk this stretch in well under an hour…

THE KICKER IS: the shad that do make it past the dam SHOOT up to Vernon Dam–20 miles distant, in just a day’s time. Seems they may feel at home swimming in an actual river…

Shad anglers help ground-truth test flow impacts at Turners Falls

Posted by on 13 May 2015 | Tagged as: American shad, Connecticut River, Conte, endangerd shortnose sturgeon, Endangered Species Act, ESA, Federal Conte Anadromous Fish Research Center, federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon, Holyoke Fish Lift, Northfield Mountain, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, shad, shad fishing, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, US Geological Survey's Conte Fish Lab

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The above photos were taken at the Rock Dam Pool today, May 13, 2015. Many shad could be seen with the naked eye fidgeting and milling through the pool. Two anglers were enjoying plucking a few out of the drink. (CLICK ON PHOTO FOR LARGER IMAGE)

Shad anglers help ground-truth test flow impacts at Turners Falls

Federally mandated test flow releases from Turners Falls Dam continued today, with flows reduced to 2,500 CFS (cubic feet per second). That drop, from 4,400 CFS the day prior, produced some interesting results for shad anglers fishing the 2-1/2 mile long Dead Reach below the dam.

At 12:20 p.m. I stopped by the Connecticut River’s Rock Dam Pool, off G Street and “Migratory” Way in Turners, basically just a few hundred yards upstream of the Conte Fish Lab. Curiously, with the tamped-down flows, the Rock Dam Pool was a-bustle with milling shad—perhaps defaulted to this site when flow got cut at the dam. What’s clear is that 2,500 CFS is not a flow level that moves migratory fish upstream in the river through this site toward the TF Dam. When I spoke to three anglers at the base of the dam just 20 minutes later, they said the shad had run out with the decreasing flow.

The river levels today at the Rock Dam though, would at least likely have sustained the presence of the annual spawning gathering of federally endangered shortnose sturgeon in the Rock Dam Pool. They were many levels above the mid-summer conditions created by dam operations at this site on May 3, 2015, which basically scuttled a year’s reproduction there. But hey, who’s enforcing the Endangered Species Act these days??

I did meet a young angler at the Rock Dam who was having a blast pulling in shad. He will graduate Westfield State this coming weekend, and noted that his dad—President Elect for the American Fisheries Society, works in fisheries for the US Fish and Wildlife Service in Hadley.
He’d been tossing in shad darts at the Rock Dam Pool for maybe an hour, and had landed and released 7 shad. Big ones, he noted. I explained a bit about the test flows, and we both stood for a bit marveling at the pods of shad turning quick laps around the pool—ten, then a run of a few, then a line of several more—all darting into shadows beneath the high, mid-spring sun.

Hopefully, he’ll carry news to his dad that these fish are here because there’s flow being released to the river. A well-kept secret in these parts is that USGS Conte Lab fisheries biologists who like to get in a little fishing on lunch break always make their way down to the Rock Dam Pool when there’s flow in the Connecticut—cause that’s where the fish want to be.
You won’t find them flicking darts into the power canal just out their front gate.

When I debriefed a trio of 20-somethings fishing below Turners Falls Dam just 20 minutes later, they reported the fishing had turned to dust once the flows were tamped down to 2,500 CFS. One of the guys said that yesterday—Tuesday, all he had to do was just cast and reel in. “I probably caught a hundred.” OK, that’s fish talk, but I’ve seen these guys before. They are shad people. When I told them the Rock Dam was rocking, one said to the woman angler with them, “Wanna go down there?” “Hell yeah!” was the response.

Lastly, I drove Greenfield High Girl’s Softball down to South Hadley later in the afternoon. It’s only a mile or so hike down to South Hadley Falls Dam from there. I took the stroll. There were maybe two dozen anglers strung out along the edge of Slim Shad Point at around 4:30 p.m., but things looked fairly quiet. I didn’t have much time, but I did a little de-briefing to two hefty Latino guys I’ve seen fishing from the Veterans Memorial Bridge before. “Shad are done!” one said of the days fishing. “There’s no water.”

Interesting, since its possible this could be equated to the cut-off of nearly 4,000 CFS up at TF Dam earlier. It’s known to take 6 – 8 hours for the impacts of flow manipulations at Northfield Mountain and Turners Falls Dam to be experienced 36 miles downstream at Holyoke. Thus, these guys may have been experiencing the impacts of test flows, which temporarily quieted the upstream run of fish. Be interesting to try and tease out the correlations. Test flows at Turners will bump up again to 6,300 CFS this Saturday through Monday.

The Greenfield Varsity Girls won at South Hadley.

As of Tuesday, Holyoke had lifted 181,000 shad.

Shad fishing reported as excellent below Turners Falls

Posted by on 12 May 2015 | Tagged as: 5-year FERC licensing process, American shad, By Pass Reach, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Dead Reach, FERC licensing process, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, shad fishing, Turners Falls, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, Uncategorized

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After decades of dismal flows and poor fishing, shad anglers immediately below the Turners Falls Dam and downstream at the Rock Dam Pool near the Conte Fish Lab, are reporting some excellent fishing. Federally-mandated test flows to help track migratory fish movement upstream through the Dead Reach of the Connecticut River below Turners Falls Dam commenced last Thursday. By Sunday, three fishermen at the Rock Dam Pool reported excellent catches while the dam was releasing 6,300 CFS (Cubic Feet per Second) the previous few days, though they noted it tailed off slightly when flow from the dam was tamped down to 4,400 CFS on Sunday.

Flow to the Rock Dam Pool, the only documented natural spawning site on the river for the federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, had been cut to mid-summer levels just a week prior. With the test flows, life-giving water was returned to this abused reach of the river and shad readily followed their ancient river path upstream toward Vermont and New Hampshire spawning waters, without being lured into the treacherous Turners Falls Power Canal at Cabot Station, just downstream.

Those shad, at the current 4,400 CFS test-flow level, are currently being landed just below the Turners Falls Dam, where ecosystem-nourishing flows are being introduced here for the first time in decades as part of the studies for relicensing of the Turners Falls and Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage hydro projects on the public’s river.

The test flows will continue for the next several weeks—which should prove an interesting citizen’s science experiment for anglers who report their catch. Flows at the 4,400 CFS level will continue today, May 12, then will be reduced to 2,500 CFS from Wednesday, May 13, through Friday, and then elevate back up to 6,300 CFS from Saturday, May 16, through Monday, May 18.

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