Northfield Mountain

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Connecticut River relicensing: a history, summary and indictments…

Posted by on 23 Nov 2021 | Tagged as: Connecticut River, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Death-Sewer, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC licensing process, FirstLight Power, Holyoke Co. v Lyman, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Massachusetts DEP, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, Public Sector Pension Investments, Relicensing, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, State of Delaware, Treasury Board of Canada, Tyler Poisson, UMass, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Will Ryan

CONNECTICUT RIVER RELICENSING: a history, summary and indictments…ahead of the secret final “settlement” talk scheduled for December 2nd by Firstlight–a backroom sausage-making meetup between FirstLight, USFWS, National Marine Fisheries, MA Div. of Fish and Wildlife, and MA DEP. MEETING CONTENTS: no public, no sunlight; nor democracy…

Below is a link to a talk I gave last Sunday at the Wilbraham Public Library. It was broadcast live, and with a live audience, as part of the ongoing Root Cause Lecture series exploring Ecologies and Economies. This series is the work of UMass graduate students Will Ryan and Tyler Poisson. Thanks to them both, and the Wilbraham Public Library.

CAUTION: you might find the information below…upsetting!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKdIusCr2ysMZTGflFJyHZg/live

THIS CONNECTICUT RIVER DEFENSE IS SPOT-ON!

Posted by on 18 Nov 2021 | Tagged as: Connecticut River, Connecticut River Conservancy, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, E-Comments, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FirstLight, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-1889, P-2485, Relicensing, State of Delaware, The Nature Conservancy, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, wildlife refuge

THIS NOTEWORTHY and pointed river defense was sent into the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on 11/17/2021 and entered into the public record–summarizing the 49 years of ecosystem devastation wrought by the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station. PLEASE READ SHAYLA FREELAND’S FULL FERC FILING FURTHER BELOW.

FirstLight–running the licensing show, has scheduled confidential, endgame license “settlement” talks with the US Fish & Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries, and MA Division of Fish & Wildlife and the MA DEP for this December 2.

IF THERE WAS EVER A MORE IMPORTANT TIME for the public to make its case for a living future for this river ecosystem, THAT TIME IS NOW.

Comments can be written, then copied and pasted into the FERC record by going to www.ferc.gov; then find E-Comment in documents and filings–then be sure to know and INCLUDE in your filing the FERC “project number” for both Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage: P-2485, and Turners Falls dam and hydro operations: P-1889. Note that other people have taken simple further steps by publishing their comments on-line, on web pages, and, importantly, sending out to enter the record in the PUBLIC media.

Shayla’s strong, thoughtful and personal summary puts any filing or public statement made by either the Connecticut River Conservancy or The Nature Conservancy about Northfield’s massive river destruction in Massachusetts to shame. Further, it leaves our public trust agencies–including the US Fish & Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, MA Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and MA DEP cowardly silent and liable for a river that’s now staring at a full CENTURY-LONG death sentence in Massachusetts.

By not stepping up, they collaborate on a broken ecosystem and the collapse of one of the Earth’s key cooling arteries. These entities have had 49 years to stand up, to speak out against this deadly machine, to end its killing–to intervene at any number of junctures. None did. Thus, the lethal, heart-stopping pumping at Northfield continues, chewing through the lives of hundreds of millions of eggs, larvae and juvenile migrant and resident fish alike every year.

In a just world this endless, massive fish kill would have been prosecuted decades ago. But not here–not in Massachusetts, where all these entities will meet in secret with FirstLight on December 2nd to decide a river’s fate. Silence and secrecy in a democratic society bear a very close resemblance to complicity and their 49 years of a failure to protect…

In stark contrast, here is a brave person is speaking for future generations–and their right to have a living planet. Thank you Shayla!

“My name is Shayla Freeland and I live in Gill. As some of you might know there is a power plant in Northfield called the Northfield Pump Station. There have been many people trying to prevent Firstlight, the owner of the pump station, from renewing their 50 year license to continue making electricity at the expense of our river. On the bridge over the Connecticut river, crossing into Turners Falls, there have been two protests against this license. Many people have invested their time and energy to try and convey how bad this process is for the environment. Personally I agree with everyone who is trying to prevent this. I live in Gill right next to the river and the dam (Firstlight also owns) so I can see first hand the destruction the station is causing. I am able to see and smell the problems.

The stench that comes from that part of the river can be absolutely horrendous. The turbines of the pump station suck in life and throw out death. When they put up the dam the other side gets very low in water and the sun fries up the bits of fish creating the horrible smell. Below the Turners Falls dam there is also an ancient Shortnose Sturgeon spawning ground and the same thing happens to them as the bits of fish. They fry. They rote. They go rancid. As you can probably tell this is not a naturally occurring problem, it’s a problem caused by Firstlight.

In the night they suck water from the Connecticut River up the Northfield Mountain when electricity is cheap. To get the water up the mountain they have to burn fossil fuels to power the pumps. Not only are they polluting the earth with this dwindling resource (because they made a choice between easy money and protecting our home) they are completely killing and destroying our rivers ecosystem. During the day when demand is high they let the water back down the mountain. As it does this it is going through turbines (which creates the electricity)chopping and killing animals. Twenty-four species have the wonderful chance to meet the
deadly blades of the turbines.Now Firstlight is about to renew their fifty year license.

So they pollute the earth, kill the animals and the river’s ecosystem, but hey they’re making easy money and we’re getting electricity so it’s okay right? No, it’s not. And the electricity they are making doesn’t even get used by the people in this area. It’s getting stored as backup for some city. Not only is the electricity not being used by the local population, but Firstlight is not paying any taxes to the town. They are an LLC based in Delaware so they are not obligated to pay us taxes.

This pump station has no benefit to the people living in this area. We are not getting electricity or taxes. It’s deadly turbines are killing fish and preventing them from helping our river prospure. Firstlight should not be allowed to get their license renewed because all they do is
pollute the planet, kill animals and destroy the Connecticut’s ecosystem, which in turn will affect us too.

HERE, is one citizen taking responsibility for a living river system, and for those who come after us…

WITH PUBLIC KEPT IN DARK, FirstLight schedules secret endgame license negotiations for December 2

Posted by on 14 Nov 2021 | Tagged as: Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, CRASC, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FirstLight, MA Department of Energy and Environmental Affairs, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Massachusetts DEP, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, public trust, right-to-know, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey, USFWS

WITH PUBLIC KEPT IN DARK, FirstLight schedules secret endgame negotiations on Northfield’s deadly river vacuuming with federal and state fisheries agencies this December 2nd.

Many people have asked when the critical secret talks are happening—finally I can offer news…

PLEASE READ TO THE BOTTOM and find out how you can meet the PLAYERS–the agencies and agents CHARGED WITH representing the interests OF THE RIVER and US!

Here is a section of FirstLight’s latest license “extension request” filing, sent electronically to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Friday, November 12.

In the last three months, FirstLight and the other parties have made substantial progress in negotiating relicensing solutions. The settlement parties have exchanged proposals on fish passage, flows, and recreation. FirstLight is currently holding discussions on fish passage and flows with federal and state resource agencies. FirstLight and the agencies held fish passage and flow meetings on September 24, October 14, and November 10, 2021 and have established an additional meeting on December 2.

The critical next backroom session, scheduled for December 2, 2021, includes the following named agencies responsible for the fate of a living Connecticut River ecosystem for the decades into the future. This from FirstLight’s FERC extension filing at its conclusion:

“The following settlement parties have affirmatively indicated that they support this timeline: the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and American Whitewater Association. Therefore, FirstLight requests that the Commission continue to defer the issuance of the Notice of Acceptance and Ready for Environmental Analysis until after January 31, 2022.”

The US Fish & Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries are the public agencies charged with “conditioning authority” to protect the Connecticut and its migratory fish at the grim and deadly ecosystem bottleneck, Northfield Mountain. Also, charged and responsible here in the Bay State as well—are the MA Division of Fish & Wildlife and Division of Environmental Protection. These are the guardians and enforcers of US and state environmental laws and protections. They are the public trustees of our river and fish. This is the public’s river.

juvenile Connecticut River shad, dead

Northfield Mountain’s miserable suction literally kills hundreds of millions of eggs, larvae and juvenile migratory and resident fish annually. Will these agencies fail the river once again—and for all, by letting Northfield reverse-suck the life out of our legally mandated fish runs? Or will they put their money where their responsibility lies, and shut its mouth to killing juvenile fish?

That is what’s at stake here. FirstLight is playing for keeps with the future of our children’s ecosystem, for a net-power-loss, deadly energy wasting contraption with profits heading first to Delaware and thence to Canada and its parent owner, PSP Investments.

There is nothing responsible or democratic about a private company and federal and state officials deciding an ecosystem’s fate in the dark… People want to know who the leaders are that are responsible–and how they can engage with them.

Given the late date, and with time being so critical I can offer this suggestion. On Wednesday, November 17, at 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. there will be a Technical Committee meeting of something called the Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, or CRASC. AND, on December 1, 1:00 – 3:00 p.m., there will be a meeting of the full (CRASC) Commission. CRASC is comprised of the federal/state fisheries leaders from the US Fish & Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries, and the state fisheries leaders from VT, MA, NH, and CT. These are top fisheries agency leaders, and CRASC is the Congressionally-authorized agency that has been responsible for managing the Connecticut River and it migratory fish runs since 1967. IT IS A PUBLIC AGENCY, though their meetings are not widely publicized, and the CRASC stopped posting the minutes to their meetings in 2017. In other words, it operates quietly outside the public eye—regardless of its critical public mandate.

The key thing to know here is that the fisheries agencies on the CRASC are literally the same ones who will be sitting down at the secret table with FirstLight on December 2, right after that meeting of CRASC leaders the day before.

So, SINCE LIVING RIVERS FLOW DOWNSTREAM, and NO RIVER SHOULD DIE IN THE DARK, as a journalist and stakeholder I’d like you to know that YOU CAN ATTEND THESE MEETINGS. It is your right. They will be held on-line, but you must pre-register to get the “teams” registration application #, and/or a phone call-in number from Ken Sprankle, the USFWS Connecticut River Coordinator and CRASC Secretary. Ken is very helpful, and this is easy to do.

Simply email Ken at: ken_sprankle@fws.gov and tell him you want to be added to the CRASC public meeting list, and that you want to attend the CRASC meeting on November 17, and also December 1. Ken will get you signed up, and send you an on-line or telephone link, and an agenda. With all the secrecy, at least here you get to see some of the agencies and players who are responsible for our public trust. REST assured, FirstLight’s representatives are always in attendance, keeping an eye on things. That’s why you should think about putting in the time. There will be considerable tech-talk at this November meeting, but here you can get to know the agents and players. AND, there is a time at set aside for the public to ask questions. If you care about a living river, get signed up to attend these on-line public meetings.

BTW, each CT River state on the CRASC has what’s called a “public sector” representative. Here, representing our fisheries protections at Northfield that representative is Dr. Andrew Fisk, who is also director of the Connecticut River Conservancy. So, if you have questions or concerns about fish kills, fish futures and Northfield operations, your CRASC public sector rep can be reached at:afisk@ctriver.org He represents you!

The Connecticut River, Extinction Rebellion and its local connections…

Posted by on 03 Nov 2021 | Tagged as: cleanup, climate change, climate-scorching, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Conservancy, Connecticut River Watershed Council, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Eversource, Extinction, Extinction Rebellion, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC license, FirstLight, Greenfield, ISO-NEW ENGLAND, Natural Gas, New Hampshire, Northeast Utilities, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, NU/WMECO, pumped storage, river cleanup, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Source to Sea Cleanup, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Vermont, Vermont Yankee

The Connecticut River, Extinction Rebellion and its local connections…

Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

…to EXTINCTION, EVERSOURCE, CLIMATE, FIRSTLIGHT, CO-2 and the “CONSERVANCY”

ON SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, AT 11:OO a.m., Extinction Rebellion demonstrators will take to the Greenfield Town Common to rally against the ravaging of the climate and the extinction of species through massive extraction and burning of fossil fuels. This comes exactly two weeks after the NO LICENSE TO KILL rally on the Common. That rally demanded FirstLight’s Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station not be issued a new decades-long license to continue killing hundreds of millions of fish and aquatic animals annually–while erasing all natural characteristics of a living river and functioning ecosystem in Massachusetts.

Counter to all common sense–and wildly contrary to popular belief, Northfield Mountain is an electricity consumer. It has been running primarily on climate scorching natural gas since its original electric power source–the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant, shut down in 2014.

In fact, looking at the sources powering the ISO-New England power grid this morning, November 3, 2021, Northfield has been laying waste to the river on 72% natural gas, another 11% imported nuclear from the CT and NH coasts, and 8% actual hydro (imported from Canada), plus another 8% from actual renewable sources. Thus, for the last SEVEN years since VY closed, this deadly electric machine has been a major source of CO-2 planetary waste and invisible climate destruction.

Northfield is a river-vacuuming electric toilet, parasitically-powering itself directly off the New England power grid to suck the life out of a 20 mile reach of the Connecticut daily, pulling it backward and uphill to a 4 billion gallon reservoir. That lifeless water is later released in thundering morning and afternoon pulses to become brief, peak-priced, second-hand electricity sold to us ratepayers as their deadly-profitable river offering.

Northfield is not what any thinking person would ever define as HYDRO POWER. Even the industry keeps it in a separate category–as it is actually a net-loss electric glutton that appears in negative percentages on the daily power grid. Nor can its deadly output ever be labeled “clean” or “renewable” energy, despite clever industry marketing.

So, when Extinction Rebellion appears on the Greenfield Common on Saturday–two weeks after the No License to Kill rally against FirstLight-Northfield, it bears pointing out that they will be assembling just yards away from the Connecticut River Watershed Council, today doing business as the Connecticut River Conservancy.


Connecticut River Conservancy’s HQ, adjacent to the Greenfield Common. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

Just six weeks back the “Conservancy” had their 25th Source to Sea Cleanup—majorly and annually funded by none other than WMECO/Northeast Utilities–today doing business as Eversource. It was WMECO/NU that actually built FirstLight’s Northfield Mountain–the drop-dead, deadliest machine that continues operating today on an extended Federal Energy Regulatory Commission license (one that expired in 2018), right in the midst of the Connecticut River S.O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish & Wildlife Refuge and the platitudinous Connecticut River National Blueway here in Massachusetts. Lacking a real river watchdog and any enforcement of existing environmental law…those designations mean absolutely NOTHING.

Yesterday, November 2nd at polling booths in East Boston, citizens overwhelmingly voted to prevent Eversource from building a new natural gas pipeline in their city, citing climate impacts and lack of necessity. You see Eversource–the Conservancy/Watershed Council’s BFF for ages, is today a major natural gas company, having taken over Columbia Gas—famous for their pipeline explosions in Lawrence, and, just a few years back in Springfield MA, with its own major gas explosion, right downtown.

The Conservancy/Council’s ole buddy Eversource/WMECO/NU–through its long history of deep-pockets-funding and CRC Board memberships, is now planning to build a new natural gas pipeline extension through Longmeadow and into Springfield. It is another grim push toward a critically baking planet—one that Eversource expects to charge ratepayers $33 million to put in place. Currently, the City of Springfield has demands out for the accruing years and some $44 million in back taxes it says Eversource has not paid. Springfield citizens are now pushing back on the giving Eversource yet another free pass through town. Both East Boston and Springfield have long histories of community racial, economic and environmental injustice. This new natural gas monopoly angling appears to continue that legacy.


Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

So, No License to Kill, Extinction Rebellion, and a whole lot of people in Western Massachusetts and New England have plenty of reason to gather on the Greenfield Common on Saturday. There is injustice aplenty, green-washed and collaborated on between Eversource-NU-WMECO, FirstLight, the Conservancy, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the byzantine natural gas consortium… all of which all circle back to Eversource and its green-washing “friends”…

Did you help with CRC’s (EVER)Source to Sea Cleanup this September?? The Conservancy and FirstLight employees actually made a clever video together…
Now that’s collaboration!

A 2021 Brown University study named Eversource as MA’s largest energy spender against clean energy and climate legislation: https://ibes.brown.edu/sites/g/files/dprerj831/files/MA-CSSN-Report-1.20.2021-Corrected-text.pdf

Still with headquarters in Hartford, below is a CT list of their largely invisible holding and affiliate companies, etc–though their Columbia Gas ownership does not show up here:

The following companies operate as “wholly owned subsidiaries” of Eversource:
Connecticut Light & Power, Public Service Company of New Hampshire, PSNH Funding LLC 3, NSTAR Electric Company, Harbor Electric Energy Company, Yankee Energy System, Inc., Yankee Gas Service, NSTAR Gas Company of Mass.(EGMA), Hopkinton LNG Corp., Eversource Gas Transmission II LLC, Eversource Holdco Corporation, Eversource Investment LLC, Eversouce Investment Service Company LLC, Aquarion Company, Aquarion Water Company, Aquarion Water Company of Connecticut, Aquarion Water Company of Massachusetts, Inc., Aquarion Water Capital of Massachusetts, Inc., Aquarion Water Company of New Hampshire, Inc., NU Enterprises, Inc., IP Strategy LLC, Eversource Energy Service Company, The Rocky River Realty Company, Holyoke Water Power Company. Eversource has residual interest in nuclear plants they’ve sold: Seabrook NH and Millstone CT.

Part ownership in: Alps to Berkshires LLC, 50% in transmission line to NY State, 15% ownership in Algonquin Gas Transmission LLC, BSW Holdco LLC, BSW ProjectCo LLC, Bay State Holdco LLC, Bay State Wind LLC, Northeast Wind Energy LLC, North East Offshore, LLC, New England Hydro-Transmission Electric Company, New England Hydro-Transmission Corp. Eversource also has interest and ownership in companies that own and manage decommissioned nuclear plants they once owned, including: Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, 65%, Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company, 24%, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, 52%. SOURCE: https://www.eversource.com/content/wma/about/about-us/doing-business-with-us/affiliates/list-of-affiliates

The Connecticut River’s MASS. Killer is Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage

Posted by on 23 Oct 2021 | Tagged as: Andrew Fisk, Atlantic salmon, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Connecticut River clean up, Connecticut River Conservancy, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Death-Sewer, E-Comments, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FirstLight, Gordon van Welie, ISO-NEW ENGLAND, Kathleen Theoharides, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, Mr. Caleb Slater, Mr. Charles Baker, Mr. Gordon van Welie, Mr. Jesse Leddick, Mr. Mark S. Tisa, Ms. Donna Wieting, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, source to sea, Uncategorized, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Supreme Court, Vermont Fish & Game, Wendi Weber

The Connecticut River’s MASS. Killer is Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage, a law-breaking ecosystem disaster

READ Bill Stubblefield’s great river defense to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and to those responsible for protecting the public’s Connecticut River for future generations here: BillStubblefield20211022-5051-1

WATCH, HEAR my Friends of the Greenfield Public Library presentation: “LIVING RIVERS FLOW DOWNSTREAM,” a 50 year history of Northfield Mountain’s killing and the officials responsible for stopping its license to kill here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qs4LHjrjtsc

Below is a list of those responsible for ending this illegal license to kill.

Do share it with your local leaders and representatives. Will they step up and end this ecosystem slaughter for coming generations? Where do they stand? What will they do to stop this killing NOW?

The FOLLOWING OFFICIALS have NO RIGHT to bargain away the life of OUR CHILDREN’s ECOSYSTEM. This is THEIR WATCH. They have a PUBLIC TRUST to defend against Connecticut River Extinction and a 40 year Connecticut River death sentence in Massachusetts:

Ms.Kathleen Theoharides, Secretary, MA Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs
Mr. Charles Baker, Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Mr. Andy Fisk, MA Public Representative, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Dir. Connecticut River Conservancy
Mr. Gordon van Welie, President and CEO, ISO-New England
Ms. Wendi Weber, US Fish & Wildlife Service Northeast Regional Director
Ms. Donna Wieting Director of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service
Mr. Mark S. Tisa, Director of the MA Division of Fisheries and Wildlife
Mr. Caleb Slater, MA Div. of Fish & Wildlife, Anadromous Fish Project Leader CRASC
Mr. Jesse Leddick, Chief of Regulatory Review
MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife

The Connecticut River still “America’s best landscaped sewer” in Massachusetts

Posted by on 12 Oct 2021 | Tagged as: America's best landscaped sewer, Connecticut River, Connecticut River clean up, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River Refuge, Connecticut River Watershed Council, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Death-Sewer, Delaware LLC, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, ISO-NEW ENGLAND, MA Department of Energy and Environmental Affairs, net-loss power, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, PSP Investments, source to sea, Turners Falls, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS

The Connecticut River still “America’s best landscaped sewer” in Massachusetts Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

Citizens standing against relicensing the river-killing Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station in Massachusetts on October 9, 2021. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

Something is deeply wrong on the Connecticut River in Massachusetts. That something is secrecy, obfuscation, and public agencies pointedly ignoring the forest for the trees. For 49 years the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station has been the number # 1 ecosystem disruptor and fish predator in the 4-state river system comprising today’s S.O. Conte Connecticut River US Fish and Wildlife Refuge.

So grim is this machine’s daily impact that it literally obliterates 100s of millions of fish and aquatic animals annually–consuming the river’s aquatic life via giant turbines that actually pull the river backward for miles and flush all that river life uphill into Northfield’s 4 billion gallon Death-Sewer each day. It’s an energy-squandering electricity resale scheme that is today netting Canadian venture capital firm PSP Investment wads of tax-sheltered cash via limited liability registration in the State of Delaware.

Thus, despite what’s been grandly touted in massive yearly hype for EXACTLY 25 INDIVIDUAL SATURDAYS since 1996, proclaiming a “cleaned-up river”–the Connecticut remains the grim, stilled, reversed and deadly, daily flush-sink it has been in Massachusetts for ALL of the NEARLY 18,000 DAYS of it’s operation since 1972.

Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The grand irony of this massive ecosystem crime is that MA Department of Energy and Environmental Affairs and Holyoke-based ISO-New England whole-heartedly support the continued use of this FirstLight-branded, net-power loss, ecosystem killer in a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission relicensing scheme that will last for decades. Meanwhile the Bay State has been home to the Connecticut River Watershed Council since 1952–as well as its quarter century of cleanup hype, while the US Fish & Wildlife’s Northeast Regional Headquarters (just 25 miles from Northfield in Hadley), has done nothing to shut the giant sucking mouth of Northfield Mountain’s death trap across their River’s quarter century as a US FISH & Wildlife Refuge

So in case you were wondering why these out-standing people are situated above the deadened Connecticut River and look content and happy to be doing something about it–these are the folks making a stand for a living ecosystem for the generations to follow. They are the people who never swallowed the Kool-Aid.

Connecticut River blog: Connecticut River stand up September 18

Posted by on 16 Sep 2021 | Tagged as: American shad, Buz Eisenberg, Clean Water Act, cleanup, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, ESA, fish kill on the Connecticut, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, pumped storage, river cleanup, shad larvae, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, Turner Falls Canal annual draining, WHMP

WHY anyone might choose stand out on the Turners Falls Gill-Montague Bridge over the Connecticut River on Saturday, September 18, 2021, 11 a.m – noon… * ALSO, new WHMP interview with Buz Eisenberg linked below *

dead juvenile Connecticut River shad… Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

PICTURED ABOVE are dead juvenile America shad–easily 150 of them. These are Connecticut River migratory fish that had been lucky enough to escape the treachery of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, just seven miles upriver. There, annually, it’s killer death toll for juvenile shad alone can hit the 2 million mark. So picture a scene like the one above, but multiply it by 100,000 or 200,000, and you start to get a picture of the invisible slaughter that’s never been cleaned up on the Connecticut. Sadly, these hapless juveniles were on their way to the sea when they met their demise in the Turners Falls Power Canal. They died just 300 yards from the dissolving riverbanks of the actual Connecticut River and the desecrated spawning habitat of the federally endangered shortnose sturgeon. Yet more responsibilities and laws flaunted and ignored.

NOTE:There are crucial times when the public has to do the job left undone for a half century after the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act became the law of the land on the Connecticut River. It’s a half dead river carcass in so many ways–a watercourse that does not even meet the definition of a living river in Massachusetts.

Just ask yourself: ON WHOSE WATCH DID THIS OCCUR??

This is a river that’s gone 50 years without a defender. A four-state US Fish & Wildlife Refuge without a single full-time, or part-time staff lawyer dedicated to its daily defense for half a century. The federal and state agencies responsible failed to protect it–and no one held their feet to the fire.

That’s how rivers die. They wither for decades under umbrella organizations that shun and deflect the bedrock necessity to accept a MISSION mandate to INVESTIGATE, ENFORCE and PROSECUTE.

We have a textbook case here:
Where there is no WATCHDOG,there is no ENFORCEMENT.

That’s why someone might choose to stand up for their river on the Turners Falls Bridge on Saturday, Sept. 18, at 11:00. It’s because NO RIVER SHOULD DIE IN THE DARK.

LINKS BELOW:
https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-meyer-StandUpforNERiver-42357321

https://whmp.com/podcasts/the-afternoon-buzz-9-16-21/

ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE NOW:

If you think the Connecticut River ecosystem should be survivable for fish and aquatic animals in all four states–and that New England’s River should meet the basic definition of a living river in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts… Then, DEMAND of these agencies and officials that any new FERC license for the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station (FERC Project # 2485) meet all the requirements of the Clean Water Act, the Rivers and Harbors Act, and all state and federal wetlands protection laws—for the Connecticut River, including safe fish passage mandated in the 1872 Supreme Court decision Holyoke Company v. Lyman. Make them hear you. Name names. Demand the cleanup of a river left comatose for half a century. It is OWED to coming generations.

(*Lots of relicensing and river information and issues notes at www.karlmeyerwriting.com/blog/ )

HERE ARE THE AGENCIES AND NAMES of those responsible for protecting the river ecosystem for future generations. Name them. Write them, then forward that letter to your Congress person and state representative–as well as the local paper. Name names. Let them know you are watching and expect them to do their duty. Finally, send your notes to FERC, using www.ferc.gov. Go to E-comments, make sure you give your name and address and specifically mention “Northfield Mountain, P-2485” when you write. That is the FERC docket number, and it’s required. BUT, mostly, say their names in public–they are working for us. IT WILL BE THEIR LEGACY TOO

ENERGY executives in the private/quasi-public sphere:

Mr. Gordon van Welie, President and CEO, ISO-New England, the “independent” system operator: Phone (413) 540-4220

Mr. Peter Brandien, Vice President of System Operations, ISO-New England:
E-mail: pbrandien@iso-ne.com. NOTE: Mr. Brandien writes the annual support letter that facilitates the daily commercial damage to the Connecticut wrought by the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project.

FEDERAL PUBLIC officials:

For endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, freshwater mussels, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eel: Ms. Donna Wieting, Director of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA Fisheries: Phone: 301-427-8400

Also, for endangered shortnose sturgeon, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eels: Mr. Sean Mcdermott, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:
E-mail: Sean.mcdermott@noaa.gov

Also at NMFS, protecting shortnose sturgeon and their habitat: Ms. Julie Crocker, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:
E-mail: Julie.crocker@noaa.gov

For federal protection and enforcement of the Clean Water Act on the Connecticut River:
Mr. Timothy L. Timmermann Office of Environmental Review, EPA New England Region 1, Boston MA 02109-3912:
E-mail: timmermann.timothy@epa.gov

For all migratory fish and safe passage on the river including American shad, herring, and endangered sturgeon:
Ms. Wendi Weber, US Fish & Wildlife Service Region 5, Hadley MA 01035: E-mail: wendi_weber@usfws.gov

MASSACHUSETTS state officials:

Ms. Kathleen Theoharides, Secretary of the MA Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs 100 Cambridge St., Suite 900, Boston, MA 02114:
Main Phone at (617) 626-1000

For Massachusetts clean water and wetland habitat protections on the Connecticut:
Mr. Brian Harrington, Bureau of Water Resources Deputy Regional Director, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight Street, Springfield MA 01103:
E-mail: Brian.d.harrington@state.ma.us

Also from MA DEP: Mr. David Cameron, PWS Section Chief, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight St., Springfield, MA 01103:
E-mail: David.cameron@state.ma.us

For state-endangered shortnose sturgeon and all Connecticut River migratory fish in MA:
Mr. Jesse Leddick, Chief of Regulatory Review, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:
E-mail: Jesse.Leddick@mass.gov

Also at MA Div. of Fish & Wildlife: Mr. Steven Mattocks, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, Fisheries, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:
E-mail: steven.mattocks.@mass.gov

EMPTIED RIVER NOTES: May 19, 2021

Posted by on 19 May 2021 | Tagged as: 1872, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River Refuge, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Endangered Species Act, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FirstLight, fish passage, Great Falls, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, Monte Belmonte, Northfield Mountain, Peskeomscut, Relicensing, Rock Dam, Turners Falls, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls Massacre, United State Supreme Court, Vernon Dam Fishway

Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

I took a bicycle ride 20 miles upstream to Vernon Dam this day in hopes of finding a few fish in the windows there. It proved a fruitless journey, though a pretty ride on a summer-like afternoon. There were plenty of lively bubbles in the windows, but not a single shad or early lamprey. Nothing.

The Vernon Fishladder and Dam Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

This was a river site smack in the midst of migration season that should have seen its first shad weeks ago. But here, on an 80 degree day, nothing.

The Connecticut’s DEAD REACH below Turners Falls Dam Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

That nothing is because the river downstream below Turners Falls Dam is all but empty. A thin stream of perhaps 1000 cubic feet per second is being dumped over the dam. What should be here, a full three years after the federal license for the hydro site expired, are flows on the order of 5X higher. That water, instead, continues to be dumped into FirstLight’s power canal in order to get an extra peak-priced power jump that puts more money in their coffers and leaves federal trust American shad and federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon starved of migration and spawning flows necessary for them to complete their life cycles in their natural habitats.

For the shad, that fully should now include the 50 miles of open spawning habitat above TF Dam that reaches to Bellows Falls VT and Charlestown NH. But, without water in the DEAD REACH for yet another year, their percentage-prospects for that are in the very low single digits.

The exposed and baking cobbles at Rock Dam, where shortnose sturgeon eggs and early life stage young are supposed to find watery shelter. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

And, the endangered sturgeon, well, the message from the company is simply–tough luck. Flows at their only documented natural spawning site in the entire ecosystem have be dismal at their Rock Dam nursery and refuge. They were Monday, and Tuesday, and again today. This is a river run by foreigners with no mercy. And, in the midst of all this–in the midst of a a relicensing for facilities whose current license ENDED three spawning seasons back, no one has stepped up for the Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon in their time of greatest need. Another season, another sidestep for federal and state fish and environment agencies who fail to act again… and again. And, just one more year for a river without a single independent watchdog–on the four-state Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National FISH & Wildlife Refuge.

This is a river that, 174 years after the US Supreme Court made the landmark(1872) environmental decision in HOLYOKE COMPANY v. LYMAN that dam and facility operators must ensure safe upstream and downstream passage for migratory fish, does not even have a single day-to-day attorney, as even the most bare bones watchdog organization would. And the one on this river has been around since Truman was president.

No water, no watchdog, no ESA enforcement. Corporate Canada–which today owns Northfield Mountain and Turners Falls/Cabot operations, has nothing to fear in this “refuge.” And, the other sad irony, not lost on me as I made my way upstream, is that today is the solemn anniversary of the Turners Falls Massacre, the grim genocidal event that wrested sovereignty from Native People in today’s southern New England on May 19, 1676. They were ambushed in the pre-dawn at Peskeomscut, the great falls, because they had come to the banks of a living river that would feed them, offer them water, shelter, and rest as it had for generations past. It was a respite that was not to endure…

Something there yet remains evident today in the starved riverbed. Recovery is still a dream denied to this place. There is yet little life. This a place that awaits healing water that might again make it whole once more.

Today it sits abandoned, reduced to computations and algorithms that see only money and megawatts as a river’s reason to be…

NOTE: Please click on the link below which includes an invitation to the WalK-the-Walk for Endangered Sturgeon to Rock Dam this Saturday. It is important that people show up for the River. Please join myself and others. And please be aware that there is some steep terrain on this walk.

https://wrsi.com/monte/how-to-save-the-shortnose-sturgeon/

RIVER SURVIVAL II: Walk-the-Walk for endangered shortnose sturgeon

Posted by on 11 May 2021 | Tagged as: Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, CRC, CRWC, endangerd shortnose sturgeon, FirstLight, Northfield Mountain, Rock Dam, Turners Falls, Uncategorized, US Geological Survey


THE ROCK DAM Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

NOTE: Below you will find an invitation to visit The Rock Dam on May 22.

It offers an opportunity to bear witness–to show up and learn at the most magical, neglected, and critically-endangered natural spawning site in the Connecticut River ecosystem. This will be a program about history, and truth-telling, and the long, tenuous struggle of the shortnose sturgeon here. You’ll be right at the place where they spawn, though the surrounding conditions may be troubling. So this may not be a program for everyone.


Slurry flows into the Rock Dam pool Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

If you want something easier, maybe some greenwashing via an on-line program offered by those who have continued the ecosystem destruction here or sidestepped their responsibilities to take action, you might look at offerings from FirstLight/Northfield Mountain for May 18th, or the Watershed Council/CRC/USGS on May 19th. These will be more like armchair, promo productions–for those who like a good story from the sidelines.


Rafters descend on Rock Dam habitat. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The Rock Dam is a place that matters. I hope you can join me and others on a respectful visit to these ancient, critical and sadly disrespected spawning grounds. This May 22nd, on-site Rock Dam program will be about keeping faith with the river, its creatures, and the sanctity of a place that has offered life to all in this Valley for thousands of years.

* PROGRAM DETAILS BELOW *

RIVER SURVIVAL II: Walk-the-Walk for endangered shortnose sturgeon
Turners Falls: meet in parking lot at south end of G Street
Saturday, May 22, 2021
10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Join Karl Meyer on a walk to the Rock Dam—the critically endangered habitat and only documented natural spawning site for the federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon. Meyer intervened with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to stop the grim, eroding conditions created by the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project and Turners Falls Dam. He’s written about sturgeon for years and authored the reknowned “Shortnose Stout” beer brand in 2013. Rock Dam is a 200 million year-old natural gem that’s helped keep the thread for this 100 million year old sturgeon species alive on the Connecticut for centuries. Learn about the shortnose’s life cycle and the industrial and natural history of this abused and undefended site going back to pre-dam times. Come, learn, protect.

Directions: Meet at the parking lot at the south end of G Street in Turners Falls for this 3/4 mile walk (1-1/2 mile round trip). Take Avenue A in Turners Falls to 11th Street. Cross the 11th St. Bridge over the canal and make the first left onto G Street. Follow G to parking lot just before the USGS Conte Anadromous Fish Research Center sign. Program runs rain or shine. ** ACCESS NOTE: this walk is mostly flat, but access to Rock Dam is on short steep terrain

CONNECTICUT RIVER: maybe not left for DEAD after all

Posted by on 04 May 2021 | Tagged as: American shad, Anadromous Fish Conservation Act, Andrew Fisk, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Connecticut River Watershed Council, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, CRC, Daniel McKiernan: Director MA Division of Marine Fisheries, Delaware LLC, Eversource, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FirstLight, Julie Crocker, Kathleen Theoharides, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Martin Suuberg, Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, NMFS, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, Ron Amidon: Commissioner MA Dept. of Fish and Game, Source to Sea Cleanup, State of Delaware, The Greenfield Recorder, Traprock Center for Peace and Justice, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Wendi Weber

CONNECTICUT RIVER: maybe not left for DEAD after all

Following the Great Earth Week Walk for River Survival to the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project on April 24th, it’s been inspiring to see people publicly raising their voices to pull the grim, daily carnage of that power-hungry machine out from the shadows. One of particular insight was written by Susan Olmsted and appeared in The Recorder on April 30:
https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-olmsted-NorthfieldHydroStation-40211638 . Later, Ms. Olmsted relayed those same points into the public record of Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s relicensing comments for the Northfield docket: FERC P-2485. Those are the routes to raising the public profile of our endlessly crippled River—its fate all but buried under confidentiality agreements and generations of inaction by the responsible agencies and so-called protectors. They all continue to lay low in a process that will decide our river’s ultimate viability for decades.


At the NMPS Intake. Photo Copyright © 2021 by James Smethurst

I again must thank the Traprock Center for Peace and Justice and Anna Gyorgy for organizing the event. Having written about this broken river for decades, and now having served on the Fish and Aquatics Study Team in this endless FERC process since 2012, it was an honor to speak up for the river with a caring and determined crowd in attendance. As I’ve noted to several people, last October I witnessed MA Energy Secretary Kathleen Theoharides and Watershed Council/Conservancy Director Andy Fisk launch a PR canoe tour for elected officials–directly upstream of the killer suction pipes of Northfield. In grim, self-serving fashion neither stepped up to the TV cameras or spoke with attendant reporters to proclaim, “This thing is our river’s greatest killer, it should be closed; this company, FirstLight, wholly re-registered these holdings out of state into Delaware as tax shelters two years back—they have no business here.” Shame on them both.

Watershed Council/CRC Director Andy Fisk, in vest, Chairs the Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission 12/10/2018

BTW, we spoke at some depth on the Walk about the NU/Eversource building-of, and current massive connections to NMPS–and also the long-standing financial and Source to Sea greenwashing links between the Watershed Council/Conservancy and Eversource? Well, here’s a little late-breaking Eversource monopoly news: https://www.eenews.net/stories/1063731537

Personally, I would feel I’d failed our Great River, this ecosystem and coming generations had I never stood in front of this killer to bear witness to the truth. NMPS is a killer, and no configuration that leaves its grim sucking mouth open for ANY part of the year will retrieve it from being the most lethal machine ever deployed on the Connecticut. After so many years I am grateful that I had that opportunity–to stand up with other people and keep faith with our river–and link with those who will depend on its living waters in the future.


Revival Walk Crowd April 24, 2021 Photo Copyright © 2021 by David Keith

I don’t think a single person in attendance that day believes the snake-oil logic for continuing NMPS: that wasting massive amounts of energy to actually pull a river backward for miles–sucking 100s of millions of fish to their deaths as it wrenches its deadened water up a mountain, will ever be any kind energy “clean” or “green” solution on a heating-up planet whose ecosystems are unraveling. FirstLight’s will merely continue the laying-waste to our long-crippled river. It has nourished life here for millennia; they want to trade that in for their few hours of peak-priced energy.


MA Secretary of Energy & Environmental Affairs Kathleen Theoharides talks to the media–just yards away from Northfield’s deadly intake on a fluff PR tour on the river, October 2020. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

It’s important to remember that this machine’s emplacement ran counter to one of the most significant landmark environmental decisions ever from the US Supreme Court, centered right here on the Connecticut River in 1872. In Holyoke Company v. Lyman the Court decided private operators of dams and facilities on the Connecticut—and thence, for all rivers, must provide safe upstream and downstream passage for migratory fish. Nearly 150 years later, this machine continues crushing millions of migratory fish—among them federal trust American shad, blueback herring and American eels. That killing occurs for eggs, larvae, juveniles and adult fish across the many months of their full migratory life cycles.

With the presence of a real watchdog, NMPS’s illegal presence never would have arisen here. There were decades to have sued for its shutdown. Today, neither its operation–nor FirstLight’s thin mitigation proposal to put up a partial, temporary net across its mouth annually that might spare some adult shad and eels from its suction just two months out of their killing year, even remotely passes the smell test for legal operation in a US Fish & Wildlife Refuge.

Raising public voices and flushing the buried dealings in this race-to-the-bottom FERC relicensing process is now the key to having some real impact in saving the Connecticut.

This Great River still feeds bodies and souls. It’s been struggling for well over half a century without an entity taking on the necessary mandate to “enforce” and take on the employ of a day-to-day legal team worthy of facing down predator corporations. This is an ecosystem destined to failure if citizens stay on the sidelines. But people are getting it; and standing up. Maybe this critical life-line of a river can be revived for the coming half century, to again nourish those of the future.

WORTH NOTING: Massachusetts and federal agency officials responsible for securing a living Connecticut River for your great, great, grand kids–upstream and down, through to Vermont and New Hampshire:

Kathleen Theoharides: Sec. of MA Energy & Environmental Affairs
Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection
Ron Amidon: Commissioner MA Dept. of Fish & Game
Daniel McKiernan: Director MA Division of Marine Fisheries
Wendi Weber: Director Region 5, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Julie Crocker: Branch Chief, Endangered Fish Recovery unit, NOAA, Gloucester MA (endangered CT River shortnose sturgeon habitat)

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