NOAA

Archived Posts from this Category

FERC sanctions crippling flows for federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon

Posted by on 01 Mar 2016 | Tagged as: 5-year FERC licensing process, endangerd shortnose sturgeon, Endangered Species Act, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon, FERC, FirstLight, Fish and Aquatics Study Team, GDF-Suez FirstLight, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, US Fish & Wildlife Service

The following Stakeholder Comments concerning proposed study flows that will wipe out this season’s spawning for federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon at their only documented natural spawning site in the river system were submitted to FERC Secretary Cheryl on Friday, February 26, 2016. They include comments submitted on Wednesday, February 24, 2016 to FERC staff, federal and state fisheries agents responsible for endangered species protection, and FirstLight–who proposed to include the crippling 1500 cfs(cubic feet per second) flows in FERC-ordered Study 3.3.19.

On Thursday, February 24, 2016, Vince E. Yearik, FERC Director of the Division of Hydropower directed FirstLight’s James Donohue that the ruinous 1500 cfs flows will be allowed at the Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon’s only documented natural spawning site in the spring of 2016.

My Stakeholder Comment letter, on the FERC official record for P-2485 and P-1889, is directly below.

Karl Meyer, M.S.
85 School Street # 3
Greenfield, MA, 01301
413-773-0006 February 26, 2016

The Honorable Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
88 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20426

RE: P-1889 and P-2485

Dear Secretary Bose,

The comments below respecting federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon and Study 3.3.19 were delivered via email to GDF-Suez FirstLight�s James Donohue, FERC staff including Brandon Cherry, and Caleb Slater(MA), Julie Crocker(NOAA), and John Warner(USFWS) on 2/24/2016.

Thank you,
Karl Meyer

Dear Chris et al,
I commented to you and in the FERC record on your RSP for Study 3.3.19, the Ultrasound Study in P-2485 and P-1889, to repel fish from Cabot Tailrace. Since I was somehow left off the email list in the �call for comments� that went out on 2/11/2016, I will take the opportunity to comment at this time.
In your newly-revised RSP you failed to reply to this comment of mine in particular:

�The final week should be at a minimum of 2,500 CFS�which, as FL has indicated in their response to a new Stakeholder Study suggested at the Rock Dam for shortnose sturgeon spawning: 2,500 CFS is the absolute minimum, uninterrupted flow necessary through the Bypass from April 25 � May 22, in order to not interfere with the spawning of a federally endangered species at Rock Dam. In their response, FL cited �Kynard� et al. Minimum flows to keep SNS embryos and eggs motile, watered, and viable are required there throughout the month of June.�

FirstLight has now indicated it intends to use test flows including 1500 cfs in its Ultrasound Study. This is unacceptable, as data shows this will harm a federally endangered species, the Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon. FirstLight has cited Kynard, Kieffer et al; Life History and Behaviour of the Connecticut River shortnose and other sturgeons, in their official FERC comments. Both FERC and the agencies are in possession of the scientific study data contained therein. An examination of Chapter 3 and the �Effects of hydroelectric operations on spawning� makes it quite clear that 2500 cfs is the minimum continuous flow needed to allow females to sustain a presence at the site and complete successful spawning. Flows go below that level�and 1500 cfs is far below that required threshold, will cause sturgeon spawning to fail.

A continuous flow of 2500 cfs is the only protective flow that should be allowed in the Ultrasound Study�it is also necessary throughout the month of June to protect the Early Life Stages of shortnose sturgeon. Please make the required modifications, as I�m certain the agencies and FERC will not give you license to run afoul of the federal Endangered Species Act, as well as similar state statutes.
A review of the FERC record, as well as your proposed Revisions for 3.3.19 are included below. Thanks.
Best,
Karl Meyer,
Fish and Aquatics Study Team

In 2015, FERC agreed with FirstLight and rejected requested snorkeling studies to determine the fish assemblage in the By Pass Reach out of an abundance of caution for impacts they might have on federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon whose only documented natural spawning site is the Rock Dam Pool in that reach.
Though the record clearly misstates that that snorkeling survey request was for the By Pass Reach downstream of Turners Falls Dam�written as �downstream of Cabot Station�, the protected status and determination to �do no harm� was quite clear in FERC�s reply. Excerpts from FERC Staff directly below.
From 01/22/2015, FERC Study Modifications Determination Letter

Study 3.3.11 – Fish Assemblage Assessment
�Requested Study Modifications

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Interior) proposes modifying the study to require FirstLight to conduct snorkeling surveys in the reach downstream of Cabot Station, in order to avoid all effects on shortnose sturgeon during the spawning season. The Nature Conservancy and Karl Meyer support Interior�s proposed study modification.

Comments on Requested Study Modifications

To avoid all effects on shortnose sturgeon during the April-June period in the reach downstream of Cabot Station, FirstLight states that it will rely on sampling from the project impoundment, sampling of the reach downstream of Cabot Station during other times of the year (after June 30), and existing data from a 2009 electrofishing survey of the area downstream of Cabot Station.

Discussion and Staff Recommendation

The goal of this study is to provide general information on fish species that are present in the impoundment and in the river downstream of the dam and Cabot Station. Based on the description in the modified study plan, FirstLight�s proposed method will provide information on species occurrence, species distribution, relative abundance, and habitat associations that will adequately describe the existing fish community. Because FirstLight�s proposed methods would achieve the goals of the study while avoiding effects on spawning sturgeon, we conclude that snorkeling is not necessary and the study plan filed with the ISR should be approved without modification.�

And�FirstLight�s current revised flow plan for 3.3.19:

�This study would establish a high frequency sound (ultrasound) array across the entire Cabot Station tailrace and determine the effect of the ensonified field on upstream migrating shad moving by Cabot Station. Bypass reach test flows during the study will include flows of 1,500 cfs, 2,500 cfs and 4,400 cfs. These flows will be released depending on river flow conditions. When possible, flows will alternate with the array on for one day then off for one day at 1,500 cfs, followed by one day on and one day off at 2,500 cfs, then one day on and one day off at 4,400 cfs. This sequence will be repeated throughout the study depending on river flow. The field study will include two components: a) DIDSON count of shad entering the Cabot fish ladder and b) detection of telemetered adult shad to determine their movements after they encounter the sound field.�

CASHING IN ON A CASH COW

Posted by on 15 Jan 2016 | Tagged as: American shad, climate change, Connecticut River, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Daily Hampshire Gazette, endangerd shortnose sturgeon, Endangered Species Act, Energy Capital Partners, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon, FERC, FirstLight, fossil plant, GDF-Suez FirstLight, ISO, ISO New England, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, New Hampshire, NMFS, NOAA, non-renewable, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, Rock Dam, shortnose sturgeon, The Greenfield Recorder, The Pioneer, The Recorder, Turners Falls dam, Uncategorized, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Vermont

The following piece appeared in the Daily Hampshire Gazette(www.gazettenet.com) and the Recorder(www.recorder.com) in the first week of January 2016.

CASHING IN ON A CASH COW

Copyright © 2015 by Karl Meyer

Ever dreamed of owning your own bank? I got a deal for you! Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project is for sale again, along with the Turners Falls canal and dam—and a string of little assets down in Connecticut. But Northfield’s the cash cow. Fourth time in a decade they’re unloading this golden calf–always at a tidy chunk of change. A quickie corporate win-win! It’s really like an A.T.M., run at the expense of the Connecticut River ecosystem.

Place works like a giant toilet–suck huge amounts of the river backward and uphill, then flush it all back and—viola, money spews out the other end. Could be ours! They’re holding bidder tours as we speak. I just need a few partners with ready credit. We go in on short-money and cash-in on the no-brainer electricity “spot market” for a few years. Then, with inflated power-price futures in play, we offload this puppy for a final cash-out of 30%–maybe 50%!

Here’s how it goes down. With the cheerleading of Northfield’s not-so-silent partner, ISO New England–the “independent” system operator (created by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission), we simply slow dance this darlin’ past the banks, the FTC and FERC. Then, in 2016, its sweet business-as-usual—maybe with new shirts for employees.

Trust me, this works every time. Everyone walks away with full pockets—without the public knowing what hit them. Northfield got wholesaled in 2006 by Northeast Generations Services(formerly WMECO—formerly of Northeast Utilities, now Eversource—you follow?) They grabbed a quick $1.34 billion for the package, slipping it to a trio of Jersey venture capitalists, Energy Capital Partners. ECP renamed their little project FirstLight Energy. Those smartest-guys-in-the-room hung-in and grabbed Northfield’s peaking spot-market profits for two years, before off-loading it for a nifty $1.89 billion in that crazy year, 2008.

With that, GDF-Suez, third owner in four years, swept in–the world’s largest private energy corporation, based in France. They’ve been gobbling up contracts to run water systems across the US under the name Suez United Water. But GDF-Suez recently did a clever name-change to Engie, keeping the public totally confused. They got game! The true costs of these premium-priced plant sales get buried in the list of acronyms on electric bills. It’s like owning a 25-mile stretch the Connecticut River to dip into for cash any time you please.

This is a turn-key operation–with us, the new guys, pushing the buttons. The joke is that the public thinks Northfield is a hydropower operation, while this baby has never produced a single watt of its own energy. It’s imported!–huge swatches of bulk electricity now run-in from outside the region to suck a mountain’s worth of flow from the Connecticut up to a reservoir. Then, dump it out on the power lines when prices peak. It’s hugely inefficient, now largely carbon-based—and massively damaging to the river. But amazingly profitable!

That’s where we come in. Sure it was built as a sister to the region’s nukes to gobble up their monstrous stream of unused electricity–because nukes can’t shut down their feverish output at night. That’s how you get to put in a giant straw and suck the Connecticut uphill at a rate of 15,000 cubic feet per second–more than enough to pull the river backward for a mile downstream under low flow conditions. But who’s watching? When the region’s last nuke shut down, nobody said ‘boo!’ with Northfield going fossil. What climate change?

And when it became clear years back that Northfield operations were imperiling spawning success for the federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon at the Rock Dam in Turners Falls–their singular natural spawning site going back into pre-history, again, nobody came forward. Not the US Fish & Wildlife Service, the National Marine Fisheries Service or the MA Division of Fish & Wildlife—or any river protection group. No bureaucrats, no suits–nobody. At Turners Falls—instead of 70% of migratory fish heading upstream toward Vermont and New Hampshire, they squeeze out 4%. We have it made!

Still skeptical? ISO and FERC are addicted to Northfield—even though its power-flush characteristics might come into play maybe a handful of times a year, if at all. For this they let owners cash in on the river whenever y they want. In 2012, the owners of this “asset” collection of 1500 megawatts(of which over 1100 MW derived from Northfield alone) told investors a full 40% of their profits were realized from “Capacity Fees.” What that means is you get paid for holding back the Connecticut! They’re not required to use it at all if they don’t want to—just flush when prices are high. Paid for being you! Of course another 50% of profit comes from generating, though the public doesn’t know it only operates a few hours a day when prices are highest.

Here’s the kicker: in 2014, after a cry-wolf energy deficit winter that never materialized, FERC–with ISO as cheerleader, sanctioned the doubling of those “capacity fees”. Plants are now collecting 2X the amount they were two years back, for having the potential to dump some power on the lines—not for actually generating. Paid for being you! With 1100 potential megawatts at Northfield, how quick can you say “windfall at the public’s expense?” Lastly, Northfield petitioned FERC the last two winters to increase its reservoir storage by a full 25%, with ISO their biggest cheerleader. FERC agreed, twice. Double-dip with a cherry, anyone?

This thing’s a cinch! Even with all the nukes shut—when this should have been moth-balled to emergency use as more climate-warming, spent nuclear junk, it soldiers on as a virtual river monopoly with the blessings of FERC and ISO. Trust me, no one goes to court. Ecosystem damage, costs to the public? Fuggetaboutit!

Got credit? Give a call!

A look inside the FERC licensing process

Posted by on 06 Jan 2015 | Tagged as: 5-year FERC licensing process, Drew Huthchison, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FERC license, FERC licensing process, fracked gas licensing, GDF-Suez FirstLight, ISO New England, Kinder Morgan, Kinder Morgan pipeline, Mt. Tom Coal Plant, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, shad, shad larvae, Turners Falls power canal, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Service’s Silvio O. Conte Anadromous Fish Lab, USFWS, Vermont Yankee, Yankee Rowe Nuclear Plant

In mid-December I was interviewed on Greenfield Community Television’s Local Bias feature by Mark Wisniewski, former Greenfield City Council President. In a wide-ranging talk we discussed my experiences with the ongoing Federal Energy Regulatory Commission licensing process as both a journalist and stakeholder in the hydro projects at Northfield Mountain and the Turners Falls Power Canal on the Connecticut River. The FERC licensing process is a cumbersome and lengthy ordeal–transpiring over a 5- year swatch of time.

Anyone interested in–or involved as a citizen in, the deluge of FERC projects currently affecting our region, might gain some insight by tuning in: from fracked-gas pipelines, to hydro, nuclear, climate and ecosystem impacts.

Local Bias airs beginning Wednesday, at 5:30 pm, and repeats on Thursday and Saturday nights at 9 pm throughout the month of January 2015.

Local Bias is produced and directed by Drew Hutchison.

Try the link below,.. or go to look up GCTV, Local Bias to connect to a copy of the show.

http://gctv.org/videos/local-bias-karl-meyer-121514

THE CONNECTICUT RIVER SHORTNOSE STURGEON: A PLANNED EXTINCTION?

Posted by on 08 Jul 2014 | Tagged as: Atlantic salmon, Connecticut River, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Dr. Boyd Kynard, ecosystem, Endangered Species Act, Extinction, federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, NMFS, NOAA, Rock Dam, Turners Falls, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS

Click on the link above for: Part one of Local Bias interview between Karl Meyer and Dr. Boyd Kynard, produced by Drew Hutchison of Greenfield Community Television.

Watch an interview with fisheries biologist Dr. Boyd Kynard who has made a career of researching migratory fish behavior and fish passage at dams in large rivers across four continents. Kynard is the long-standing research expert on the federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon.

For 45 years federal and state fisheries agencies plowed $100s-of-millions into a program targeting “restoration” of a strain of Connecticut River salmon extinct since 1809. Failing to understand the concept of extinction, that project failed.

For those same 45 years agencies including NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service, the US Fish & Wildlife Service, and Massachusetts and Connecticut fish and wildlife departments ignored, dismissed, and failed to provide the protections, outreach, and funding needed to rescue a native, four foot-long, living fossil: the federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon.

Listed among just 22 fish species in the original 1967 federal Endangered Species Act, these agencies–as well as regional non-profits, have failed to protect the 2-mile stretch of river decimated by industrial flows containing the only known natural spawning grounds of this pre- Dinosaur-Age fish: the pool below a natural rocky cleft in the river known as the Rock Dam, in Turners Falls, MA. Just 300 Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon can access the Rock Dam site today–where industrial flows cripple their spawning attempts, and endangered species protections are ignored.

March 1st Deadline: Comments to FERC on Northfield/Turners Falls Hydro Relicensing

Posted by on 25 Feb 2013 | Tagged as: American shad, blueback herring, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte, endangerd shortnose sturgeon, EPA, ESA, federal trust fish, federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon, FirstLight, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Reservoir, Rock Dam, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey's Conte Fish Lab

Last Call to send comments and study recommendations to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to guide the Connecticut River conditions mandated in the 2018 relicensing of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project and Turners Falls Hydroelectric Project.  The licenses will the river ecosystem for decades to come.

To file any comments on the relicensing of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project and the Turners Falls Hydroelectric Project you will need to register at: www.ferc.gov/docs-filing/efiling.asp

You must include the following project numbers for Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project and Turners Falls Hydroelectric Project respectively, with any comments: P-2485-063, and P-1889-081.

All comments are due before MARCH 1, 2013.  Be sure to include your full mailing address, phone number, and email address in your comments. (I’ve attached my comments, which are now registered with FERC, below.)

Karl Meyer, M.S. Environmental Science

Greenfield, MA, 01301                                                             February 25, 2013

To: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

RE: Comments on FERC Relicensing Projects: No. P- 2485-063 (Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project) and No. P-1889-081 (Turners Falls Hydroelectric Project)

Dear Commissioners,

Please carefully adhere to the standard FERC relicensing processes and deadlines as you relicense these two projects.  Holding public and agency site visits in early October 2012 may have been deemed convenient for circumventing winter weather that might have affected visits, however it placed invested parties in the difficult position of having to view and judge hydro operations and configurations at both facilities without the benefit of knowing what operational changes and information FirstLight Power Resources was including in its PAD.

Further, of the three FERC group tours at Northfield/Turners Falls, only one group, mine, was able to view the area of the By-Pass Reach and the Turners Falls Canal and head gates from the downstream side of the Turners Falls gate house.  This is a critical area to view, and the excuse being given was that there was construction happening on the Turners Falls Bridge.  However, unrestricted access to view these sites was available to any passing citizen just yards away via a bike and walking path, open to the public.  My group only received access because I made a direct request to FirstLight’s John Howard, who was my former boss.

The two other tour groups did not get to see the confused flows created by the 14 head gates at the upstream end of the Turners Falls Canal.  The canal has been a major disappointment as the upstream conduit for all migratory fish these last 34 years.  Those head gates are open at full bore during much of the upstream fish migration season; they should have been a key component of the tour.  Nor did interested parties get to view the exposed rock bed and de-pauperizing flow regimes created by flood gate manipulations at the Turners Falls Dam that renders the By-Pass Reach a non-river.  FERC should place particular emphasis on any studies that redirect upstream migrating fish away from the confused and failed conditions experienced in the Turners Falls Power Canal, and send them directly upstream to a lift at TF Dam.  That configuration has worked quite effectively at Holyoke Dam these last 58 years.

In late January 2013, GDF-Suez FirstLight Power Resource representatives noted at public hearings that it intends to apply to FERC with a Proposed Study Plan to begin its own investigations of flows in the reach below Turners Falls Dam this April 2013, rather than the 2014 and 2015 study seasons noted in the FERC Relicensing Process.  No study in this critical segment of river known as the By-pass Reach should be undertaken without a full vetting of the proposals.  This section of river is critical spawning habitat for the federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, also listed as endangered under the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Act.  It is also the age-old upstream route for spawning federal-trust American shad and blueback herring.  It is noteworthy that in their expedited study application that FirstLight cites the area below Cabot Station as a key shortnose sturgeon spawning location, while the critical site for these fish—used for likely thousands of years, is the natural escarpment in the riverbed known as Rock Dam, a half mile upstream of Cabot Station.

In a letter from FERC to Mr. John Howard of FirstLight Power Resources dated March 12, 2010, the Commission noted that FirstLight had failed to comply with Article 34 of the license for the Turners Falls Project, releasing just 120 cubic feet per second to this segment of the river to protect shortnose sturgeon from the effects of low flows.  The minimum requirement is 125 CFS.

With respect to measured, in-depth, long-term investigations on flow and river regulation in this reach I would direct you to the 17 years of research done by Dr. Boyd Kynard and colleagues at the Conte Anadromous Fish Research Center adjacent to this river segment in Turners Falls, MA.  The work was largely conducted via the federal Conte Lab under the US Fish & Wildlife Service and later, under the US Geological Survey, when it took over responsibilities for Conte Lab after 1999.  These investigations were also supplemented by funds, research and personnel from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

This research is documented in: Life History and Behaviour of Connecticut River shortnose and other sturgeons, published in 2102 by the World Sturgeon Conservation Society and produced by Books on Demand, GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany: ISBN 978-3-8448-2801-6.  Copies can be obtained from the North American Sturgeon and Paddlefish Society:

www.nasps-sturgeon.org/#!publications  Chapter 3 concerns the long-term study of flows and river regulation on spawning success of the last 300, spawning-capable, federally endangered shortnose sturgeon in this river system—covering the period of 1993 – 2005.  This is critical, long-term research that includes seven years of findings from the time before Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage and Turners Falls Hydroelectric Project operated as a regulated utility, and the seven years when Northfield’s pumping was unconstrained by regulations and operated to profit from price spikes and drops in the energy spot market using the public’s river.  Deregulation was fully implemented here in 2000 or thereabouts.  All of these issues need careful consideration before sanctioning a rushed study plan in such a critical river reach.

When considering a new license for these facilities, careful consideration of the public’s interest should be made respecting the changes and power generation, flows, and operational practices from the commencement of the current licenses down to the present.  In 2012, Northfield Mountain Station added 40 megawatts of power to its generating facilities through retooling two of its turbines.  This increase nearly equals the total power generated at HG&E’s Holyoke Dam, the next downstream project licensed by FERC.  Two remaining turbines await power up-rates, which is a considerable addition to the generation at this plant, originally proposed and installed at 1,000 megawatts.  Currently, due to mid-license changes, it now produces 1,119 megawatts of power in an unregulated power market. noteworthy and important to be considered in weighing the public’s right to a living ecosystem, upstream fish passage, and protection of endangered species, is that Northfield Mountain’s original license was for a plant used to create “peaking power, and as a reserve unit.”  It can only produce 6-8 hours of stored power before it is spent and needs to purchase replacement power on the open market.  Its stated intention was to peak twice daily in high-demand winter and summer months, and once a day during shoulder months in spring and fall when energy demand is low.  Northfield now generates when demand is present, or—when energy prices will make the greatest profit for investors.  The river and the states have been impoverished by this profound change.

The building of Northfield was based on the availability of current and proposed power from collected regional nuclear sources (New England Power Pool) that included Maine Yankee (closed 1997); Yankee Rowe (closed 1992) Connecticut Yankee’s Haddam Neck (closed 1994), as well as two proposed nuclear plants at Montague, MA (never built.)  Vermont Yankee is currently the only “local” nuclear plant still operating, and its 40 year operating license expired March 21, 2012.  Its continued operation is contingent on findings in the courts.  It is currently operated at a loss by Entergy, and has a failing condenser system which could force its closure.  In short, Northfield is now operated well beyond the bounds of its originally stated purpose.  The public’s river is paying a high price for power, much of it now imported to pump river reserves uphill to Northfield’s reservoir from sources outside the region.  The ecological impacts to fish runs and the damaging flow regimes imperiling endangered species in the river are apparent.

As a facility with great ecological impacts that cannot produce any of its own power–one totally dependent on outside sources for power, one proposal for using this stored power source put before the Federal Power Commission in the 1960s was that Northfield not operate during the spring fish migration due to its impacts on the runs.  It is time to revisit the option of silencing the effects of Northfield Mountain so that towns and cities including Greenfield, Montague, Gill, Turners Falls, and Northfield, MA; and all the towns north to Vernon, Brattleboro and Bellows Falls, VT, and Hinsdale and Walpole, NH receive their share of the river’s ecological bounty.

Northfield does serve a function as an emergency “reserve unit” for ISO New England (Independent Systems Operator) during times of severe heat waves, or high winter demand, to deliver a high volume of power on short notice to accommodate spikes in the power grid.  Northfield could be taken off-line and kept in reserve to be operated by ISO New England solely for that purpose during the low-demand spring energy months when fish are migrating.  This would greatly benefit river ecology, species, and all upstream stakeholders.  New England’s power grid resources are currently rated at 15% above demand.  Removing the damaging effects of these operations on river ecology during critical months is a simple, equitable solution.

Northfield and Turners Falls have greatly profited by incremental power increases and operational changes over the past 34 years, while the public has watched flows, regulation, and conditions in the By-pass Reach wither to a brutal, feast-or-famine regime that denies spawning for endangered fish, and passage for upstream migrants.  This situation has effectively privatized the 2-1/2 miles of river, depriving my town, Greenfield, as well as Gill, of its share of fish and a river.  This de-pauperization has impacted all the towns upstream of Cabot Station and Turners Falls dam into central Vermont and New Hampshire.  None of these municipalities have received compensation, though in many states the loss and damage to these fish populations would be considered “take” under state statutes.  Damage in the By-Pass Reach to the Connecticut River’s last 300, spawning-capable Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon carries a significant federal fine, as well as possible imprisonment.

FirstLight’s new requests for more generation at both licensed sites should be rejected, and the damaging mid-license flow and power increases should be reversed in any new license.  Indeed, since there have now been no less than FIVE different owner/operators of this facility in the last 14 years, it would be prudent to grant only the shortest license possible in order to help track and minimize damage to the ecosystem due to operational/managerial changes, and protect the public’s interest in a living river.

Northfield’s impacts have never been fully measured with respect to flows in the By-pass Reach, but it is clear that fish passage is now at, or below, the paltry levels of the 1980s, and just a fraction of the 40 – 60% passage upstream long-targeted by the US Fish & Wildlife Service of fish that had been passed at the Holyoke Fish Lift.  Regulated, continuously monitored flows should be returned to the By-pass Reach at this time, and continuous monitoring should be included in any new licenses issued.  FirstLight has noted that in-stream data loggers for river levels and flow have been subject to vandalism.  Continuous camera monitoring of river levels and open and closed gate positions at the Turners Falls Dam would go a long way toward insuring compliance with any new license conditions.  This is an inexpensive solution that could easily include a back-up system.

With a federally endangered species present in the By-pass Reach, as well as federal-trust migrating American shad and blueback herring, FERC would do well to consider enforcing regulated flows in this stretch in accordance with law and statutes in the current license.  NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service has had the USGS Conte Lab findings from studies in the By-Pass reach by Kynard et al, in their possession since 2007.  This agency—as well as the MA Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, could intervene at any time.  These impacts are also affecting the success of the federal/state Connecticut River Migratory Fisheries Restoration, begun in 1967, which stipulates that all the states share equally in the bounty of migratory fish—as both a recreational and seafood resource.  In several studies by the Massachusetts Cooperative Fisheries Unit at UMass/Amherst from the 1980s it is noted that blueback herring, (Alosa aestivalis) were noted gathering at the base of Turners Falls Dam, and were also noted spawning in the mouth of the Fall River–just 300 feet downstream of the dam, by then Conte Lab Director Steve Rideout.

Further, in the late 1980s, in another mid-license power up-rate, up to 5,000 CFS was redirected out of the By-pass Reach and into the Turners Falls Power Canal for use by Cabot Station and a refurbished Unit # 1, some 1-1/2 miles upstream of Cabot.  This was undoubtedly another blow to the shortnose sturgeon attempting to spawn at their ancient grounds at the Rock Dam, though sturgeon spawning in the Connecticut here was not confirmed until 1993.

In the PAD, it is noted that FERC had not found any compliance issues during its inspections of these two projects.  However, as well as a failure to release minimum flows for sturgeon in 2009, I would direct you the US Environmental Protection Agency’s August 3, 2010 letter and Administrative Order Docket No. 10-016, sent to Mr. James Ginnetti, FirstLight Vice President, noting violations of the federal Clean Water Act.  FirstLight knowingly dumped up to 45,000 cubic square yards of silt into the Connecticut River below its fouled pumped storage plant in an attempt to clear its tunnels and intake.  This illegal enterprise was undertaken by FirstLight after failing to conduct silt removal in a manner consistent with the “due diligence” stated in its operating license.  This dumping took place throughout upstream fish migration season, May 1, 2010, or thereabouts, and continued until the EPA Cease and Desist Order of August 2010.  At that time, FERC then became involved in this egregious license violation, requesting a full report from Mr. John Howard, Plant Manager, in a FERC letter dated August 10, 2010.

In a subsequent fall meeting with agency and non-profit river interests, a FirstLight representative stated that they did not know how to remove silt from their upper reservoir, and that it had never been done successfully.  That admission came after 40 years of operating their plant.  Hence, the public, and FERC are being asked to grant a new license to operators who have not shown they can successfully maintain their facility without profoundly affecting a navigable four-state waterway and a migratory fish highway.  FirstLight has now asked for deadline relief, and is promising to have a study of siltation completed in 2014.  Perhaps all study decisions should be held in abeyance until that time, 2014—which would comply with FERC Licensing Guidelines.

 

Sincerely,

Karl Meyer

Greenfield, MA

A Failure to Protect

Posted by on 02 Aug 2012 | Tagged as: American shad, Bellows Falls Fishway, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conservation Law Foundation, Conte, endangerd shortnose sturgeon, federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon, FERC license, FirstLight, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey, US Geological Survey's Conte Fish Lab, USFWS

Copyright © 2012, by Karl Meyer      All Rights Reserved

The following essay appeared in July in the Vermont Digger (www.vtdigger.org); the Rutland Herald (www.rutlandherald.com), and other Valley venues.

A Failure to Protect

This Valley lost a lion of environmental defense when former Conservation Law Foundation Attorney and Antioch University Professor Alexandra Dawson of Hadley, MA died last December.  Quietly today, time grows desperately short for the ecosystem’s only federally-endangered migratory fish–the Connecticut River Shortnose sturgeon.  Alive since the dinosaurs, they arrived shortly after the glaciers left.  They are clinging to life by a thread–with perhaps 300 attempting to spawn annually in miserable conditions created in the 2-mile stretch of river below Turners Falls Dam.  NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service is responsible for protecting them; NMFS has known fully of those conditions since 2004.

FirstLight-GDF-Suez creates those conditions, right next to the US Fish & Wildlife’s Great Falls Discovery Center.  Yet the public is taught nothing of them.  Abandoned by federal agencies, the Shortnose is one industrial disaster or spill from extinction.  Your grandkids wouldn’t have been interested anyway…

But just in case, describe something that was a cross between a dinosaur, a catfish, and a shark.  At 3 – 4 feet long, Shortnose have bony plates instead of scales, with shark-like tails at one end, and suctioning, toothless mouths below cat-like feelers at the other.  They scarf down freshwater mussels whole; then grind them up in gizzards.  Shortnoses can live over 40 years: one alive today might’ve witnessed Richard Nixon signing the Endangered Species Act in 1973.  They had other priorities though, like survival.  But for how much longer?

Conditions most-imperiling the Shortnose are overwhelmingly the result of FirstLight-GDF-Suez’s floodgate manipulations and punishing water pulses sent to the riverbed and coursing down their two-mile long Turners Falls Power Canal via their dam, and operations at their giant 1,080 megawatt (now 1102 MW) Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station upstream.  Below the dam you won’t find anything like a river.  For a fish its manipulated chaos–a feast or famine flow regime run largely to maximize the day-trader profit margins of today’s deregulated energy spot-market.  And things may have just gotten worse.

FirstLight’s pumping and dam operations are the biggest disruptor to this ecosystem for a 7 mile stretch–affecting migratory fish restoration failures upstream to Bellows Falls, VT, and down to the Sound.  Instead of shad and other migrants moving up natural river habitat to the dam, they are funneled into a deathtrap: the turbine-riddled bottleneck of the Turners Falls Power Canal.  Barely one shad in ten emerges upstream alive–while crowded-in fish turning back out of that canal are diced-up in its blades.  US Conte Fish Lab researchers dubbed last year’s power canal shad passage a “success.”  FirstLight helped fund their study.  The dismal 16,000 shad they tallied mirrored “success” from 1987, a quarter century back.

And, if you are a spawning-age Shortnose wholly-dependent on spring riverbed flows resembling a natural system below that dam: you’re out of luck.  Annually, attempts at spawning fail in an ancient pool near Conte Lab.  Or, as conditions deteriorate, they default downstream to try spawning below the canal’s outflow.  Here again reproductive failure is common.  Dam-deflected surges deluge their gatherings; or flows get cut-off in minutes, causing mating-stage fish to abandon spawning.  Even when eggs get fertilized, embryos get silted-over or washed away by floodgate surges–or left to die on de-pauperized banks when flow is cut.  Most years no young are produced.  That’s extinction’s fast-track.

FirstLight’s Northfield Mountain offers tours of its 2 megawatt solar installation, but none to its reservoir and pumped-storage plant where, during fish migration in 2010, they dumped 45,000 cubic square yards of sludge directly in the river over 92 days.  This winter they quietly added 22 megawatts to those giant turbines: more than half all the power generated by HG&E’s Holyoke Dam.  This occurred despite their failure last July to have an EPA-mandated plan in place to prevent “polluting the navigable waters of the United States” with a mountain of pumped-storage silt.  Where are the public Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hearings on this license change?  Where is the Environmental Impact Assessment for endangered Shortnose sturgeon?

Northfield, dependent on nuclear power to pump its water, opened in 1970.  Its legally-stated purpose was as a “reserve” power source—to operate a few hours mornings and afternoons during peak energy use.  It can generate just 8-1/2 hours; then its reserve is depleted. Originally it was proposed they’d shut during fish migration.  Today, wildly outside its stated intent, those giant pumps are switched on like a coin-op laundry–day, night, with turnaround intervals of as little as 15 minutes.

Time is running out for the Shortnose; corporate fines for harming one start at $200,000. Our region’s electric capacity now exceeds 15% of demand.  Except for emergency power grid situations, why is this plant allowed to cripple an ecosystem?  Alexandra Dawson would surely cheer if her old Conservation Law colleagues sued National Marine Fisheries Service: for failure to protect a New England biological gem.

Environmental journalist Karl Meyer writes about the Connecticut River from Greenfield, MA and holds an MS in Environmental Science from Antioch University.

« Previous Page