Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection

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Greenwashing, or How Many Times Can You Sell a Dead River?

Posted by on 09 Mar 2022 | Tagged as: America's best landscaped sewer, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Daily Hampshire Gazette, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, fish kill, Greenfield Recorder, Julie Crocker, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Mark Tisa, Martin Suuberg, Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection, Massachusetts DEP, Nation's best landscaped sewer, net-loss power, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, right-to-know, Rock Dam, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, The Springfield Republican, UMass, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Wendi Weber, Will Ryan

It’s like an old joke: HOW MANY TIMES CAN YOU SELL A DEAD RIVER? In the case of the Connecticut River and the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project the answer is: Twice a Day for Fifty Years!

And the new answer to that old joke–if our federal and state leaders fail to step up again for this ecosystem: TWICE A DAY FOR 100 YEARS AND COUNTING!

Participants in a 2016 program at the fragile Rock Dam spawning habitat of the shortnose sturgeon that I did with Boyd Kynard.

Please, if you missed it in the Daily Hampshire Gazette or The Recorder, read BELOW the terrific op ed by Will Ryan, a UMass graduate and Northfield Mountain investigator, along with his colleagues. Will attended one of my river programs at the fragile Rock Dam spawning habitat of the federally endangered shortnose sturgeon. It sunk in–what a failed and unprotected ecosystem exists in Massachusetts, and that there really has never been a watchdog here to force the corporations or the agencies to comply with established law. It’s seen as merely a cash cow, run amok.

https://www.masslive.com/opinion/2022/03/firstlight-is-greenwashing-effects-on-health-of-connecticut-river-viewpoint.html

Joyriders descend on the fragile Rock Dam habitat, an ancient, starved and embattled place that many of us consider sacrosanct for its biological and cultural significance.

In a time when the very fabric of the Earth is rapidly fraying, it would be criminal of public officials to turn their back on the chance to revive the key living artery of our ecosystem. The US Fish & Wildlife Service, MA Dept. of Environmental Protection, MA Fisheries & Wildlife and NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries must step up now. The ugly scale of this antiquated scheme is to relicense the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station to literally continue sucking away the life of the river for the next half century–re-marketing its deadened flow as twice-produced, net-loss megawatts to places as far away as New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland.

Right now leaders of those agencies are getting a second chance to do what’s morally and ethically required to assure there’s a Connecticut River legacy to pass on to future generations. Will they stand up, or will they bow to a short-sighted, long-term corporate cash scheme that trades an ecosystem for a net-loss, mega-scale power export configuration?

Predecessors of those four agencies failed disastrously 50 years ago by agreeing to allow that uninvestigated, brutal and lethally-disruptive machine to be installed on the Connecticut River. Today, that deadly contraption is being cleverly rebranded as clean, renewable and Earth-friendly–pedaled as the single best idea to accomplish energy storage for future generations here. In fact, its brutality has been unparalleled in this river’s natural history.

River-killing pumped storage is a 20th century crime, put forward in place of any number of energy storage and delivery configurations that should already be in place by 2022. It’s as if the only way to keep the lights on is to kill the very thing that has literally fed and sustained life in this Valley for millennia.

If you are lucky, you literally get one second-chance a century to conserve, protect and enforce the environmental protections left endlessly unattended on New England’s Great River. Like so many people in the Connecticut River Valley, I would never be the person who would turn their back on restoring this region’s critical ecosystem artery after a half century. That wholesale slaughter has come entirely at the hands of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project.

The Connecticut is a river without a bona fide protector, one with not even an NGO who can say they employ a single staff lawyer after 70 years of watershed council/conservancy window dressing. That’s what has left this ecosystem in tatters for generations. The corporations and the environmental agencies have never had a single thing to fear as the half century disaster rolled along….

Right now, the Connecticut River’s survival as this ecosystem’s most vital organ rests in their hands. It’s way past time our public trust agency leaders actually walked the talk. It’s time for them to stand up for the River’s life, and for those who come later. Here are their names. Use them, publicly. No river should die in the dark. They are being mentioned in Letters to the Editor, and No License to Kill filings with FERC:
Wendi Weber, Director Region 5 US Fish & Wildlife Service, wendi_weber@fws.gov; Martin Suuberg, Commissioner of MA Dept. of Environmental Protection; Mark Tisa, Director of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, mark.tisa@state.ma.us; Julie Crocker, NOAA/National Marine Fisheries ecosystems and energy branch chief, julie.crocker@noaa.gov,

And, finally, and once more–time is short in this relicensing process. FirstLight is again making claims they will have the fed/state agencies bought and sold in their secret, backroom license negotiations by March 15th. However unlikely, it is still time to keep up the pressure NOW! If you haven’t, or know someone who can, get them to take public action with FERC and the leaders noted above.

Again, here’s the NO License to Kill filing process for FERC–please share it, get someone to write, write a new letter yourself, NOW!

Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

And thanks to all, or almost all–because this is hardly a complete list of those who have written FERC or op eds, or letters, or shown up on bridges and made signs. We’re still in the game! Think, if you can, of doing something NOW, a letter, asking a friend. Something that pushes this River’s life out of the backroom shadows and into the light. There is only NOW! RIGHT NOW!

Joseph W Stubblefield, Sanjay Arwade, Jonathan S Shefftz, Jamie Rowen, Michael Giles, William H. Pete, Nicholas Reich, James Lowenthal, Katharine Sims, William Daniels, Paige Wilder, Karl Meyer, Shayla G Freeland, Mary J Metzger, Robert Arbib, C Grecsek, Malcolm G Everett, Mike Cournyn, Robert Catlin, Don Ogden, William N. Ryan, Elizabeth Whitcomb, Judith Nietsche, Celt Grant, Susan Olmsted, David B. Keith, Glen Ayers, Virginia Hastings, Annie Chappell, James Seretta, Ron Barto, Robert Dickerman, Pamela Scott, Tanya Dragan, Lin Respess, Rebecca Tippens, Sigurd Nilsen, Peggy Matthews-Nilsen, Amy Rose, Steven Wilkinson, Stephen Kerr, Nancy Obertz, Dorothy McIver, Robert Sweener, Seth Wilpan, Norma Roche, Fergus Marshall, Louise P. Doud, Vicki Citron, John Nelson Jr., Jon Burgess, Robert F Porzio, Garrett D Connelly, Dave Dersham, Betsy Corner, Graham Hayward, Sid Siff, Paul Richmond, Betsy Browning, Rebecca Robbins, James Smethurst, Laura Doughty, Mary Hall, Laura Kaye, Frank Ribeiro, Andrew Hutchison, Mark Russo, Judith Phillips, Priscilla Lynch, Molly Freeland, John Hoffman, Roberta Murphy, Dodi Melnicoff, Ethel S. White.

The Connecticut River BUZZ: the NO LICENSE TO KILL podcast with WHMP host Buz Eisenberg, and the LATEST FERC citizen filings

Posted by on 30 Jan 2022 | Tagged as: Andrew Tittler, Buz Eisenberg, CommonWealth Magazine, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River Refuge, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, CRC, crippled ecosystem, critical habitat, E-Comments, ecosystem, Endangered Species Act, ESA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FERC Comments, FERC license, FirstLight, Jesse Leddick, Kathleen Theoharides, MA Department of Energy and Environmental Affairs, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Martin Suuberg, Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection, Mr. Jesse Leddick, Mr. Mark S. Tisa, Nation's best landscaped sewer, NMFS, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, right-to-know, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Wendi Weber, WHMP

The Connecticut River BUZZ: hear the NO LICENSE TO KILL podcast with WHMP host Buz Eisenberg, Greenfield Community College professor and attorney focused on civil liberties and human rights. Eisenberg represented detainees at Guantánamo Bay for 12 years beginning in 2004.

VALLEY CITIZENS CONTINUE TO HOLD OFF FirstLight’s plans in their fight for a living river; see their latest NO NEW NORTHFIELD FERC LICENSE on-the-record testimonies and the WHMP Afternoon Buz podcast link, BELOW:

1/27/2022: FirstLight’s crumbling, manganese-weeping Connecticut River banks adjacent to the Rock Dam river pool–beleaguered spawning and nursery site for the federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon.

* Legitimate watchdogs file INJUNCTIONS the second they find corporate infractions. They don’t look the other way in the face of ecosystem destruction for decades…

https://whmp.com/podcasts/the-afternoon-buzz-1-25-22/

Manganese-laced slurry directly entering critical habitat for the shortnose sturgeon. CRC refused to take water samples at this site, though they want to open it up to kayaks and rafts, and the attendant swimming that occurs here.

Document Accession #: 20220127-5119 Filed Date: 01/27/2022
Cynthia Lawton-Singer, Conway, MA.

“I strongly oppose the relicensing of the Northfield Mountain hydroelectric plant. The system requires more energy input to power itself than the energy that it will create. This contraption regularly disrupts and destroys the ecology of the river as it sucks every living organism out of the river and passes it through turbines. In doing this and then releasing the water from the mountain-top reservoir back into the river, the flow of the Connecticut River is reversed, once again disrupting the living creatures in the mile up and down stream from the outlet. The pump is powered by natural gas. A gas-powered pumping machine that seriously disrupts a MAJOR , four-state river’s ecology ( including endangered species, the Short-nosed Sturgeon), and is a net-energy CONSUMER, has no business calling itself a “green” or “sustainable.”

The damage done, in addition, to the river banks and to the aesthetic appeal of the Connecticut River leaves the Northfield community with a damaged and unappealing natural resource. The River should be an asset that will help the economy of the town bringing in tourists and sports-persons. Because of the disturbances on the river, none of the potential ecological or economic value of the Connecticut River is available to the Town of Northfield Massachusetts or to any of the upstream communities in Vermont and New Hampshire which would benefit from a return of the Short-nosed Sturgeon and a living river. We MUST not continue to make the mistake made 50 years ago and relicense this monstrosity. Another fifty years of this will seal the fates of countless species and deprive communities along the entire course of this river of a living beautiful, healthy Connecticut River. Again, PLEASE DO NOT relicense! Think of future generations. Thank you for your serious consideration of these objections.”
Any credible watchdog would have filed for an INJUNCTION for the deadly, suctioned and reversed river miles at Northfield Mountain, and the grim conditions for endangered sturgeon years ago. It would long-ago have been placed IN-THE-RECORD and prominent–as critical defense in this FERC relicensing. A poser would tell people that its fine to wait until AFTER federal and state agencies sign a secret 50-year settlement deal with FirstLight. A 70 year-old organization without a single staff lawyer would have people believe they can fix these little problems afterward

Document Accession #: 20220125-5000 Filed Date: 01/25/2022
Andy Rothschild, Greenfield, MA.

“Given the environmental challenges that our planet and its inhabitants face today and the increasing challenges that it will face over the next fifty years, it doesn’t make any sense to me to relicense the Northfield Station. The system requires more energy input to power itself than the energy that it will create. All the while, doing damage to the Connecticut River, its banks and the fish within it. Please think long and hard about the damage that would be done in the present and for the next crucial fifty years of our planet’s existence. Thank you.”

Document Accession #: 20220124-5001 Filed Date: 01/24/2022
Anna, Arlington, MA.

“I strongly oppose the relicensing of the Northfield Mountain hydroelectric plant. While shifting energy production to renewables is a pertinent step in battling the climate crisis, such a transition must be done in a manner that takes necessary precautions. This hydro plant reverses river flow and disrupts essential ecosystems of the Connecticut River. It is powered by natural gas. These two facts alone are reason enough to reconsider calling this project “green” or, even remotely sustainable. The Connecticut River, home to globally significant tidelands and 10 federally threatened aquatic species, is a watershed that spans four different states: VT, NH, MA, and CT. An estimated 2 million people live in the CR watershed. It is with utmost importance that we protect the river, not further degrade it’s well-being. The Northfield Mountain hydro plant should therefore be denied recertification.
Thank you.”

HERE ARE THE RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT OFFICIALS AND THEIR NEGOTIATION REPRESENTATIVES who are meeting behind closed doors with FirstLight:

wendi_weber@fws.gov, Director Region 5 US Fish & Wildlife Service; Martin Suuberg, Commissioner of MA Dept. of Environmental Protection; andrew.tittler@sol.doi.gov, lead council at the table for USFWS; melissa_grader@fws.gov, at the table for our migratory fish; julie.crocker@noaa.gov, National Marine Fisheries Service Endangered Fish Recovery Branch Chief (endangered sturgeon); william.mcdavitt@noaa.gov, at the table for our migratory fish; mark.tisa@state.ma.us, Director of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, jesse.leddick@state.ma.us, Chief of Regulatory Review MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife.

AGAIN, if you haven’t yet submitted testimony–or know of others who want to defend our River’s right to survive as a living system, here’s the FERC formula to share:

Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

This is THE PUBLIC’S RIVER!

NOTE: River ecosystem protection is inextricably linked to uplands and forests: see this great piece from Commonwealth Magazine:
https://commonwealthmagazine.org/opinion/use-our-forests-to-fight-climate-change/

THE GREAT FAILURE TO PROTECT

Posted by on 22 May 2021 | Tagged as: Cabot Woods, Clean Water Act, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Endangered Species Act, Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, ESA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chairman, FERC Commissioner Richard Glick, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, Julie Crocker, Kathleen Theoharides, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection, Monte Belmonte, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Nipmuck, NMFS, Norwottuck, P-1889, P-2485, Pocumtuck, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, Section 9–Prohibition of Take Section 9(a)(1), Shortnose Stout, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, State of Delaware, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey, Wendi Weber, wrsi.com

THE GREAT FAILURE TO PROTECT: Flaunting the Endangered Species Act and Other federal and state laws governing clean water and habitat on the Connecticut River at Rock Dam in Massachusetts


Photo credit: US Geological Service

FirstLight’s Turners Falls and Cabot Station under the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission License #: FERC P-1889.

The ROCK DAM spawning nursery on the Connecticut River: the ONLY documented NATURAL spawning site for the ONLY FEDERALLY-ENDANGERED MIGRATORY FISH on the Connecticut River: the CONNECTICUT RIVER SHORTNOSE STURGEON.


Desiccating and baking shortnose sturgeon nursery habitat in the Connecticut River at the Rock Dam pool on May 21, 2021.
Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The FEDERAL ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, Section 9: the term “TAKE” MAKES IT ILLEGAL TO: “to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect, or to attempt to engage in any such conduct.”

Other federal and state laws NOT being ENFORCED on the Connecticut River at this critical habitat: the CLEAN WATER ACT, THE WETLANDS PROTECTION ACT, and, the Supreme Court’s 1872 landmark environmental decision for the Connecticut River in Holyoke Company v. Lyman—mandating that private operators of dams and facilities on the Connecticut—and thence for all rivers, must provide safe upstream and downstream passage for migratory fish.

A red slurry enters the Connecticut at the Rock Dam

Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

When there is no WATCHDOG, there is no ENFORCEMENT.

THE: federal and state agencies and leaders responsible for implementation, protection and enforcement of laws and conditions protecting spawning, habitat, life-cycle and survival of the Connecticut River’s sole federal and state endangered migratory fish: THE CONNECTICUT RIVER SHORTNOSE STURGEON

THEIR NAMES:

Phil Glick, Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission:
Julie Crocker: Branch Chief, Endangered Fish Recovery unit, NOAA, Gloucester MA (
Kathleen Theoharides: Sec. of MA Energy & Environmental Affairs
Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection
Ron Amidon: Commissioner MA Dept. of Fish & Game
Daniel McKiernan: Director MA Division of Marine Fisheries
Wendi Weber: Director Region 5, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Here is a link to further discussion of testing the connection between the TF Canal and grim sludge at Rock Dam–w/Monte Belmonte, WRSI.com
https://wrsi.com/monte/how-to-save-the-shortnose-sturgeon/

When there is no WATCHDOG, there is no ENFORCEMENT.

CONNECTICUT RIVER: maybe not left for DEAD after all

Posted by on 04 May 2021 | Tagged as: American shad, Anadromous Fish Conservation Act, Andrew Fisk, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Connecticut River Watershed Council, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, CRC, Daniel McKiernan: Director MA Division of Marine Fisheries, Delaware LLC, Eversource, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FirstLight, Julie Crocker, Kathleen Theoharides, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Martin Suuberg, Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, NMFS, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, Ron Amidon: Commissioner MA Dept. of Fish and Game, Source to Sea Cleanup, State of Delaware, The Greenfield Recorder, Traprock Center for Peace and Justice, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Wendi Weber

CONNECTICUT RIVER: maybe not left for DEAD after all

Following the Great Earth Week Walk for River Survival to the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project on April 24th, it’s been inspiring to see people publicly raising their voices to pull the grim, daily carnage of that power-hungry machine out from the shadows. One of particular insight was written by Susan Olmsted and appeared in The Recorder on April 30:
https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-olmsted-NorthfieldHydroStation-40211638 . Later, Ms. Olmsted relayed those same points into the public record of Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s relicensing comments for the Northfield docket: FERC P-2485. Those are the routes to raising the public profile of our endlessly crippled River—its fate all but buried under confidentiality agreements and generations of inaction by the responsible agencies and so-called protectors. They all continue to lay low in a process that will decide our river’s ultimate viability for decades.


At the NMPS Intake. Photo Copyright © 2021 by James Smethurst

I again must thank the Traprock Center for Peace and Justice and Anna Gyorgy for organizing the event. Having written about this broken river for decades, and now having served on the Fish and Aquatics Study Team in this endless FERC process since 2012, it was an honor to speak up for the river with a caring and determined crowd in attendance. As I’ve noted to several people, last October I witnessed MA Energy Secretary Kathleen Theoharides and Watershed Council/Conservancy Director Andy Fisk launch a PR canoe tour for elected officials–directly upstream of the killer suction pipes of Northfield. In grim, self-serving fashion neither stepped up to the TV cameras or spoke with attendant reporters to proclaim, “This thing is our river’s greatest killer, it should be closed; this company, FirstLight, wholly re-registered these holdings out of state into Delaware as tax shelters two years back—they have no business here.” Shame on them both.

Watershed Council/CRC Director Andy Fisk, in vest, Chairs the Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission 12/10/2018

BTW, we spoke at some depth on the Walk about the NU/Eversource building-of, and current massive connections to NMPS–and also the long-standing financial and Source to Sea greenwashing links between the Watershed Council/Conservancy and Eversource? Well, here’s a little late-breaking Eversource monopoly news: https://www.eenews.net/stories/1063731537

Personally, I would feel I’d failed our Great River, this ecosystem and coming generations had I never stood in front of this killer to bear witness to the truth. NMPS is a killer, and no configuration that leaves its grim sucking mouth open for ANY part of the year will retrieve it from being the most lethal machine ever deployed on the Connecticut. After so many years I am grateful that I had that opportunity–to stand up with other people and keep faith with our river–and link with those who will depend on its living waters in the future.


Revival Walk Crowd April 24, 2021 Photo Copyright © 2021 by David Keith

I don’t think a single person in attendance that day believes the snake-oil logic for continuing NMPS: that wasting massive amounts of energy to actually pull a river backward for miles–sucking 100s of millions of fish to their deaths as it wrenches its deadened water up a mountain, will ever be any kind energy “clean” or “green” solution on a heating-up planet whose ecosystems are unraveling. FirstLight’s will merely continue the laying-waste to our long-crippled river. It has nourished life here for millennia; they want to trade that in for their few hours of peak-priced energy.


MA Secretary of Energy & Environmental Affairs Kathleen Theoharides talks to the media–just yards away from Northfield’s deadly intake on a fluff PR tour on the river, October 2020. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

It’s important to remember that this machine’s emplacement ran counter to one of the most significant landmark environmental decisions ever from the US Supreme Court, centered right here on the Connecticut River in 1872. In Holyoke Company v. Lyman the Court decided private operators of dams and facilities on the Connecticut—and thence, for all rivers, must provide safe upstream and downstream passage for migratory fish. Nearly 150 years later, this machine continues crushing millions of migratory fish—among them federal trust American shad, blueback herring and American eels. That killing occurs for eggs, larvae, juveniles and adult fish across the many months of their full migratory life cycles.

With the presence of a real watchdog, NMPS’s illegal presence never would have arisen here. There were decades to have sued for its shutdown. Today, neither its operation–nor FirstLight’s thin mitigation proposal to put up a partial, temporary net across its mouth annually that might spare some adult shad and eels from its suction just two months out of their killing year, even remotely passes the smell test for legal operation in a US Fish & Wildlife Refuge.

Raising public voices and flushing the buried dealings in this race-to-the-bottom FERC relicensing process is now the key to having some real impact in saving the Connecticut.

This Great River still feeds bodies and souls. It’s been struggling for well over half a century without an entity taking on the necessary mandate to “enforce” and take on the employ of a day-to-day legal team worthy of facing down predator corporations. This is an ecosystem destined to failure if citizens stay on the sidelines. But people are getting it; and standing up. Maybe this critical life-line of a river can be revived for the coming half century, to again nourish those of the future.

WORTH NOTING: Massachusetts and federal agency officials responsible for securing a living Connecticut River for your great, great, grand kids–upstream and down, through to Vermont and New Hampshire:

Kathleen Theoharides: Sec. of MA Energy & Environmental Affairs
Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection
Ron Amidon: Commissioner MA Dept. of Fish & Game
Daniel McKiernan: Director MA Division of Marine Fisheries
Wendi Weber: Director Region 5, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Julie Crocker: Branch Chief, Endangered Fish Recovery unit, NOAA, Gloucester MA (endangered CT River shortnose sturgeon habitat)