Jesse Leddick

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CONNECTICUT RIVER CASUAL TRAGIC HISTORY HIKE: Sat., May 14th

Posted by on 06 May 2022 | Tagged as: America's best landscaped sewer, Andrew Fisk, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Day of Mourning, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Federal Conte Anadromous Fish Research Center, federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeion, Great Falls, Jesse Leddick, Julie Crocker, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, Mark Tisa, Martin Suuberg, migratory fish, Nation's best landscaped sewer, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, no license to kill, NOAA, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, public trust, Rock Dam, shad, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey's Conte Fish Lab, USFWS, Wendi Weber

THE CONNECTICUT RIVER CASUAL TRAGIC HISTORY HIKE:
Saturday, May 14, 2022, 9:30 – 11:00 a.m..

The April 2, 2022, Connecticut River Day of Mourning. Photo courtesy of John Bos.

Trip meets 9:30 in the courtyard of the Great Falls Discovery Center and continues onto the Rail Trail. Photo Copyright © 2022 by Karl Meyer

I hope some folks are able join this long and casual history walk. * * Please be aware that it will be close to 5 miles–with the return to Great Falls to be done on your own. As noted, a bike or even a 2nd car-pool, relay-car can be left near the walk’s end and return point. Bikes can be locked near Conte Lab–also, relay cars could be parked in the public lot at the end of G-Street, where “Migratory Way” continues along the canal heading the last 1/2 mile to Rock Dam. (I’ll be on my bike.)

The April 2nd Connecticut River Day of Mourning. Photo courtesy of John Bos.

The Connecticut River casual, tragic history hike
Saturday, May 14, 2022, 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Meet: Great Falls Discovery Center courtyard, Avenue A, Turners Falls
Free. No pre-registration required. * * Rain cancels.

Join journalist Karl Meyer for this 2-1/2 mile (one-way) unnatural history walk, starting at the Great Falls Discovery Center and Turners Falls dam’s failed salmon ladder. This casual hike partly follows the Rail Trail’s 200 year old transportation and power canal. We’ll cross it on a one-way bridge, pass a 1906 generating station; then head to G Street and down “Migratory Way” to unprotected sturgeon habitat at the river’s Rock Dam near the USGS Conte Fish Lab. We end above the failed fish ladder adjacent to Cabot hydro station. NOTE: * * Participants responsible for returning to Great Falls on their own (total: 5-mile round trip). It’s possible to pre-stash a locked bike near Conte Lab along Migratory Way, then cycle back via the Rail Trail.

DEAD American shad at the Rock Dam, May 2021: a public trust migratory fish guaranteed safe passage to VT and NH waters by the US Supreme Court back in 1872. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

*** OH, and here are a few LINKS, the first two comprising defense of an undefended river by citizens; the last three are where foreign vultures are spending the ill-gotten spoils from our massively broken river–far from our Valley ecosystem:

https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-Meyer-Don-t-Take-FirstLight-for-Granted-46104531

https://www.recorder.com/ltr-Ogden-FirstLight-s-Lack-of-Urgency-Threatening-Shortnose-Sturgeon-46144862

https://energycentral.com/news/invenergy-and-energyre-secure-offshore-wind-lease-award-and-announce-formation-investor

https://www.bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/news/2022/05/02/hydro-electric-firstlight-allegheny-8-9.html

https://apnews.com/press-release/business-wire/business-new-york-pennsylvania-ca11a3273cfb45eeb0e7181075ebe2df

A Connecticut River Day of Mourning: STANDOUT this Sat. Apr. 2

Posted by on 30 Mar 2022 | Tagged as: 1872, Connecticut River, Connecticut River blog, Connecticut River Conservancy, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River Watershed Council, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Death-Sewer, Eversource, FERC, FirstLight Power, Greenfield Recorder, Jesse Leddick, Julie Crocker, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Mark Tisa, Martin Suuberg, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, Mr. Jesse Leddick, Mr. Mark S. Tisa, New Hampshire, NMFS, no license to kill, Northeast Utilities, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, NU/WMECO, PSP Investments, Public Sector Pension Investments, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Source to Sea Cleanup, State of Delaware, Turners Falls, Turners Falls dam, USFWS, Vermont, Vernon Dam Fishway

A CONNECTICUT RIVER DAY OF MOURNING:

NO RIVER SHOULD EVER DIE IN THE DARK!

Standout on: Saturday April 2, 2022, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

WHERE:Turners Falls, on the TF Gill/Montague Bridge just off Rt. 2 East above the Connecticut River in Massachusetts.

A heartbreaking, river-betraying, FirstLight-filed Agreement in Principle has been signed by the US Fish & Wildlife Service, MA Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries, and MA Natural Heritage, and sent to FERC.

It’s a CAPITULATION, a soulless document WITHOUT PRINCIPLE.
* READ IT at the END OF THIS POST.*

Come, WEAR BLACK, stand up for the SOUL of OUR RIVER:
Saturday, April 2, 2022, 11 am – 1 pm.

Please, everyone who has ever fought for the truth about this river, the life of this river—all of you who have marched, stood out, written and shouted publicly “NO LICENSE TO KILL” for our ancient Connecticut and its living waters, come to the Gill/Montague Bridge above the River on April 2nd.

https://vtdigger.org/2022/03/30/karl-meyer-a-connecticut-river-day-of-mourning-will-be-held-april-2/

We will stand in honor of the soul of this Valley–above FirstLight’s TF dam, controlled from inside Northfield Mountain, 5 miles away. We’ll be across from US Fish & Wildlife Service-funded and MA Division of Conservation and Recreation-run, Great Falls Discovery Center. Each one of these entities is culpable for allowing a four-state ecosystem to be turned into our river’s 23-mile MORTUARY by Northfield’s brutality in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Come, stand together and bear witness. NO RIVER SHOULD DIE IN THE DARK!

Please WEAR BLACK, and perhaps bring signs that name the names of those responsible. If you have an old shoe box or something small that can stand-in as symbolic coffin for the 20 miles of dead river here, cover it in black and place a single-page cut-out of a DEAD FISH inside–to illustrate the murderous continuation of Northfield’s license. Symbolically, we’ll feed a few into a shredder as witness to this failed ecosystem.

Northfield Mountain, Northfield MA, graveyard where Our Connecticut River Ecosystem Dies… Photo Copyright © 2022 by Karl Meyer

WHY?: Because the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, the most murderous, wasteful, river-reversing parasite ever licensed to kill on New England’s Great River was betrayed by the US Fish & Wildlife Service, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries & Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage & Endangered Species, and the National Marine Fisheries Service on St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, 2022. Behind closed doors they signed a heartbreakingly-grim Agreement in Principle (AIP) toward granting a new FERC license that will re-enshrine and continue the most brutal, murderous, river-reversing flows and ecosystem-dismemberment—occurring unabated here in Massachusetts since Northfield came on line in 1972.

This document, *LINKED AND INCLUDED AT THE END OF THIS POST*, is literally an agreement WITHOUT PRINCIPLE, as they are our guardians of the Public Trust—encumbered to protect our river, its fish and the coming generations who must depend on a living river ecosystem. In a cheap bit of grandstanding, the Connecticut River Watershed Council(CRC), in business since 1952—who should have stopped this killer from being built 50 years ago, made a show of walking away without signing this AIP. After signing another one..

Fifty years late they appear to have found the courage to mildly label Northfield as a killer–after staying mum and taking the power company’s cash for decades. Here is Director Andy Fisk’s new-found outrage about this River’s conveyor belt of death, a half century after the fact: “…Northfield Mountain has been operating for many years without any protection against fish being killed by the turbines.” Wow Andy, nice catch… It’s killed virtually EVERYTHING it’s sucked in–during all the 50 years the Connecticut River Watershed Council/Conservancy has been in business…


The deadly, suctioning, parasitic intake of FirstLight/PSP Investment’s Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project–the most efficient electric predator ever sanctioned to operate in this 4 state ecosystem. Photo Copyright © 2022 by Karl Meyer

In their watchdog claims of 70 years, they are perhaps the most complicit. They never did a protector’s job; never took the corporations or state and federal agencies to court for violations of some of the most basic environmental laws and river and fish protections dating back to 1872. This new “in it but not of it” posture should be wholly condemned. It’s a CRC version of alternative facts. They are a failed NGO, one that has let 50 years of the unconscionable annual slaughter of literally 100s of millions of fish eggs, juvenile and adult fish and developing larvae of some 24 different species from 3 states be suctioned to their deaths by Northfield, built by CRC’s great benefactor and BFF, NU/Eversource, in 1972. No staff lawyers, no bark, no TEETH!

In 2022, CRC finally makes a bland public statement recognizing that at Northfield there are “fish being killed by the turbines.” That half century of slaughter is on their watch.

Getting back to the public trust, the new Agreement WITHOUT Principle was signed under the directorship of US Fish & Wildlife Service Region 5 head Wendi Weber; Mark Tisa sanctioned it as MA Division of Fish & Wildlife Director, Jesse Leddick inked-in directly as leader of the MA Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program, and Julie Crocker, NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service ESA Fish, Ecosystems and Energy Branch Chief also agreed to let that promissory note of their legal intent to a new Northfield license be signed.

And who are they selling our ecosystem out to? Why it’s come-lately venture capital’s FirstLight Power, a subsidiary of Canada’s Public Sector Pension Investments. PSP/FirstLight arrived as big-budget bargain investment shoppers, buying up the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station and Turners Falls Hydro Projects at basement rates in 2016. Then, in a marvelous vulture-capital-esque move, they quickly divided their MA assets in 2018, and reregistered them into Delaware tax shelters. Now–with the cowardly 50 years of no-show protection from federal and state agencies here, FirstLight will have the killer keys to 20-plus miles of the Connecticut—impacting three New England states, for decades.

As their constituents, they have failed US. At a time when the Earth is foundering, they’ve agreed to allow a river system to be strangled, reversed and culled of virtually all its aquatic life daily at Northfield. Meanwhile PSP/FirstLight will likely have execs walking off with hefty million dollar bonuses and golden parachutes, as our public trust agents stay in the shadows as abject failures.

After 50 years, this murderous slaughter is being renewed AGAIN, on their watch!

If these agencies were corporations, obligated to produce RESULTS for the benefit of all of us as public trust constituents—there would be massive outcries for resignations from the likes of Ms. Weber, Mr. Tisa, Mr. Leddick, and Ms. Crocker. Instead, they’ll likely have the option to retire years before their abject failure on behalf of the Connecticut River in three states becomes fully visible. Perhaps a few will do the right thing now, plus Mr. Fisk.

* * LASTLY: HERE is that Agreement in Principle–the document signalling the ABANDONMENT of a LIVING CONNECTICUT RIVER ECOSYSTEM
CLICK ON THIS LINK:

* * * RiverSALE-20220318-5004-1 * * *

The Connecticut River BUZZ: the NO LICENSE TO KILL podcast with WHMP host Buz Eisenberg, and the LATEST FERC citizen filings

Posted by on 30 Jan 2022 | Tagged as: Andrew Tittler, Buz Eisenberg, CommonWealth Magazine, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River Refuge, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, CRC, crippled ecosystem, critical habitat, E-Comments, ecosystem, Endangered Species Act, ESA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FERC Comments, FERC license, FirstLight, Jesse Leddick, Kathleen Theoharides, MA Department of Energy and Environmental Affairs, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Martin Suuberg, Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection, Mr. Jesse Leddick, Mr. Mark S. Tisa, Nation's best landscaped sewer, NMFS, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, right-to-know, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Wendi Weber, WHMP

The Connecticut River BUZZ: hear the NO LICENSE TO KILL podcast with WHMP host Buz Eisenberg, Greenfield Community College professor and attorney focused on civil liberties and human rights. Eisenberg represented detainees at Guantánamo Bay for 12 years beginning in 2004.

VALLEY CITIZENS CONTINUE TO HOLD OFF FirstLight’s plans in their fight for a living river; see their latest NO NEW NORTHFIELD FERC LICENSE on-the-record testimonies and the WHMP Afternoon Buz podcast link, BELOW:

1/27/2022: FirstLight’s crumbling, manganese-weeping Connecticut River banks adjacent to the Rock Dam river pool–beleaguered spawning and nursery site for the federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon.

* Legitimate watchdogs file INJUNCTIONS the second they find corporate infractions. They don’t look the other way in the face of ecosystem destruction for decades…

https://whmp.com/podcasts/the-afternoon-buzz-1-25-22/

Manganese-laced slurry directly entering critical habitat for the shortnose sturgeon. CRC refused to take water samples at this site, though they want to open it up to kayaks and rafts, and the attendant swimming that occurs here.

Document Accession #: 20220127-5119 Filed Date: 01/27/2022
Cynthia Lawton-Singer, Conway, MA.

“I strongly oppose the relicensing of the Northfield Mountain hydroelectric plant. The system requires more energy input to power itself than the energy that it will create. This contraption regularly disrupts and destroys the ecology of the river as it sucks every living organism out of the river and passes it through turbines. In doing this and then releasing the water from the mountain-top reservoir back into the river, the flow of the Connecticut River is reversed, once again disrupting the living creatures in the mile up and down stream from the outlet. The pump is powered by natural gas. A gas-powered pumping machine that seriously disrupts a MAJOR , four-state river’s ecology ( including endangered species, the Short-nosed Sturgeon), and is a net-energy CONSUMER, has no business calling itself a “green” or “sustainable.”

The damage done, in addition, to the river banks and to the aesthetic appeal of the Connecticut River leaves the Northfield community with a damaged and unappealing natural resource. The River should be an asset that will help the economy of the town bringing in tourists and sports-persons. Because of the disturbances on the river, none of the potential ecological or economic value of the Connecticut River is available to the Town of Northfield Massachusetts or to any of the upstream communities in Vermont and New Hampshire which would benefit from a return of the Short-nosed Sturgeon and a living river. We MUST not continue to make the mistake made 50 years ago and relicense this monstrosity. Another fifty years of this will seal the fates of countless species and deprive communities along the entire course of this river of a living beautiful, healthy Connecticut River. Again, PLEASE DO NOT relicense! Think of future generations. Thank you for your serious consideration of these objections.”
Any credible watchdog would have filed for an INJUNCTION for the deadly, suctioned and reversed river miles at Northfield Mountain, and the grim conditions for endangered sturgeon years ago. It would long-ago have been placed IN-THE-RECORD and prominent–as critical defense in this FERC relicensing. A poser would tell people that its fine to wait until AFTER federal and state agencies sign a secret 50-year settlement deal with FirstLight. A 70 year-old organization without a single staff lawyer would have people believe they can fix these little problems afterward

Document Accession #: 20220125-5000 Filed Date: 01/25/2022
Andy Rothschild, Greenfield, MA.

“Given the environmental challenges that our planet and its inhabitants face today and the increasing challenges that it will face over the next fifty years, it doesn’t make any sense to me to relicense the Northfield Station. The system requires more energy input to power itself than the energy that it will create. All the while, doing damage to the Connecticut River, its banks and the fish within it. Please think long and hard about the damage that would be done in the present and for the next crucial fifty years of our planet’s existence. Thank you.”

Document Accession #: 20220124-5001 Filed Date: 01/24/2022
Anna, Arlington, MA.

“I strongly oppose the relicensing of the Northfield Mountain hydroelectric plant. While shifting energy production to renewables is a pertinent step in battling the climate crisis, such a transition must be done in a manner that takes necessary precautions. This hydro plant reverses river flow and disrupts essential ecosystems of the Connecticut River. It is powered by natural gas. These two facts alone are reason enough to reconsider calling this project “green” or, even remotely sustainable. The Connecticut River, home to globally significant tidelands and 10 federally threatened aquatic species, is a watershed that spans four different states: VT, NH, MA, and CT. An estimated 2 million people live in the CR watershed. It is with utmost importance that we protect the river, not further degrade it’s well-being. The Northfield Mountain hydro plant should therefore be denied recertification.
Thank you.”

HERE ARE THE RESPONSIBLE DEPARTMENT OFFICIALS AND THEIR NEGOTIATION REPRESENTATIVES who are meeting behind closed doors with FirstLight:

wendi_weber@fws.gov, Director Region 5 US Fish & Wildlife Service; Martin Suuberg, Commissioner of MA Dept. of Environmental Protection; andrew.tittler@sol.doi.gov, lead council at the table for USFWS; melissa_grader@fws.gov, at the table for our migratory fish; julie.crocker@noaa.gov, National Marine Fisheries Service Endangered Fish Recovery Branch Chief (endangered sturgeon); william.mcdavitt@noaa.gov, at the table for our migratory fish; mark.tisa@state.ma.us, Director of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, jesse.leddick@state.ma.us, Chief of Regulatory Review MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife.

AGAIN, if you haven’t yet submitted testimony–or know of others who want to defend our River’s right to survive as a living system, here’s the FERC formula to share:

Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

This is THE PUBLIC’S RIVER!

NOTE: River ecosystem protection is inextricably linked to uplands and forests: see this great piece from Commonwealth Magazine:
https://commonwealthmagazine.org/opinion/use-our-forests-to-fight-climate-change/

Connecticut River blog: source of a salmon sham; how the public can steer a river’s future

Posted by on 21 Jul 2021 | Tagged as: 5-year FERC licensing process, Brian Harrington, Catherine Carlson, climate change, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, CRASC, Daniel McKiernan, David Cameron, Donna Wieting, E-Comments, Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, Eversource, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FERC Comments, FERC Commissioner Richard Glick, FERC Secretary Kimberly D. Bose, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, Gordon van Welie, Holyoke Co. v Lyman, ISO-NEW ENGLAND, Jesse Leddick, Julie Crocker, Kathleen Theoharides, Kimberly D. Bose, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, Local Bias, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, New Hampshire, NMFS, NOAA, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, P-1889, P-2485, Peter Brandien, Public Comment period, Public Sector Pension Investments, Rock Dam, Sam Lovejoy, Sean McDermott, shad, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Steven Mattocks, Timothy L. Timmermann, Turners Falls, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Vermont, Wendi Weber

Connecticut River blog: source of a salmon sham; how the public can steer a river’s future Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

Kathleen Theoharides, Massachuetts’ Secretary of the Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs before launching on a PR kayak tour of the river at FirstLight’s dock next to the intake of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, October 2020. Photo Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

NOTE: as a journalist and citizen I’ve been a participating stakeholder for nearly a decade in the ongoing Federal Energy Regulatory Commission relicensing process for the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project and Turners Falls/Cabot hydro operations. In that light, I encourage people to first view the half-hour segment of Local Bias, linked below. Then, return to this post and its resource list below for ways to participate in the critical decisions now being made about the Connecticut River. They will impact its currently crippled ecosystem for generations to come.

LOCAL BIAS link: https://youtu.be/IX2Rv2NYq3s

Since 1872 the US Supreme Court has made it the law of the land that migratory fish on US Rivers are guaranteed safe upstream and downstream passage at dams and industrial river sites. That decision was centered on a Massachusetts case at the Holyoke Dam. One hundred forty-nine years later that law remains essentially unfulfilled at an endangered species’ critical spawning and nursery site on the Connecticut River at Montague, MA, as well as at the Turners Falls Dam in that town.

Further, that law remains glaringly unenforced and unimplemented at the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project in Northfield MA, where the river is literally sucked into reverse, and millions of eggs and downstream running juvenile American shad are pulled to their “functional extirpation”(vacuumed to their deaths) yearly, on their way to the ocean from Vermont and New Hampshire spawning reaches. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has now owed Vermont and New Hampshire—and really all of New England, a living river for almost exactly a century and a half.

Warning sign announcing the dangers of Northfield’s massive intake suction. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The current Canadian parent-owners of that net-loss power regeneration/resale site are proposing only an ineffective, seasonal “barrier net” at the vacuum mouth of this facility, the very ‘solution’ that leaves this monstrous sucking in place to kill all those Vermont and New Hampshire produced eggs and baby shad, crippling the prospects for returning adult shad to those states from the Atlantic four years in the future.

The donuts and coffee were on FirstLight for the state officials and representatives taking part in last October’s little PR kayak tour. Photo Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

Northfield Mountain’s net-power-loss energy consumption literally swallows and squanders the entire annual energy equivalents of whole cities and counties as it ravages the Connecticut River, using it as a crushing and deadly energy relay switch.

FirstLight is applying to FERC—backed up by a power-hungry, ecosystem-and-climate-indifferent ISO-New England, for a license to kill for decades to come. Northfield Mountain wastes monstrous amounts of grid energy, while ravaging New England’s critical main ocean connection and planetary cooling artery…

Below are resources available to the public for interacting and participating with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in licensing decisions, and government agency officials charged with implementing the public trust on the Connecticut River.

www.karlmeyerwriting.com/blog

NOTE: the landmark US Supreme Court environmental decision centered on the Connecticut River came back in 1872 in Holyoke Company v. Lyman, requiring safe up- and down-stream protection for migratory fish.

Send public comments on relicensing of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project and Turners Falls/Cabot Hydro Stations to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The “project numbers” must be included, as well as your name and address, in order to become part of the public record. They should be concise, citing specifics in a paragraph or two, noting Northfield Mountain P-2485 and Turners Falls/Cabot P-1889.

Send via www.ferc.gov, usingE-comment, with the salutation going to: “Kimberly D. Bowles, Secretary.” Those comments can also include a cc to the current chair of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission: Richard Glick.

Decisions concerning foreign interests and use of the Connecticut River are happening at this time, and the river in Massachusetts has sat largely emptied or dead here for half a century—a situation enabled by the Commonwealth and its officials’ enduring, ugly and pointed environmental neglect.

To gain effect, letters can be cc’d to federal-and-state officials who are the vested stakeholders representing the public in the protection of the river and resources. Those publicly recorded FERC entries can also be forwarded to local newspapers and media outlets.

LIST of executives–plus officials from federal and state agencies who represent the public in protecting the Connecticut, its migratory fish, aquatic animals and habitats through their “conditioning authority” powers:

ENERGY executives in the private/quasi-public sphere:

Mr. Gordon van Welie, President and CEO, ISO-New England, the “independent” system operator:
Phone (413) 540-4220

Mr. Peter Brandien, Vice President of System Operations, ISO-New England:

E-mail: pbrandien@iso-ne.com .

NOTE: Mr. Brandien writes the annual support letter that facilitates the daily commercial damage to the Connecticut wrought by the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project. ISO has never acknowledged to the public that NMPS is NOT essential to the DAILY functioning of the power grid. Instead it encourages and shackles the public to those peak-priced, daily ravages as NMPS is handsomely paid to hold back several hours of reserve emergency-function megawatts for ISO’s 20th Century bulk power grid in case of a rare blackout (like the one in 2003), and also for occasional use–at scattered intervals, in controlling grid fluctuations.

ISO should have ago been curtailed as a functionary for private mega power interests. Today’s grid should already be based on distributed generation and micro-grid functions in this time of climate chaos and cyber crime. Energy and storage should be located nearest to where it is produced and used. Future linking of river-ravaging NMPS to 200-mile-distant wind turbines is wholly criminal when compressed air storage can be located close to metro/industrial coastal centers—including implementation at sites like Everett, Somerset, New Bedford, and elsewhere. That would render the system resilient, local and detachable–and rescue New England’s Connecticut River ecosystem to support generations to come across the next half century.

But, today and into the future, counter to Holyoke Co. v. Lyman, , ISO will happily sell off a US ecosystem’s daily life to foreign venture capital interests, keeping NMPS in lucrative daily play for decades into the future. The bottom line function of ISO-New England—forget ecosystems and climate, is apparently commercial first, and foremost. In their own words: to “protect the health of the region’s economy and the well-being of its people by ensuring the constant availability of competitively-priced wholesale electricity—today and for future generations.” They love to employ the term “clean”, but never elaborate on glaring incongruities, fallacies or impacts. Future generations apparently will have no need of living ecosystems, just an endless stream of “competitively-priced” energy. They NEVER mention energy CONSERVATION…

FEDERAL PUBLIC officials:

For endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, freshwater mussels, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eel:
Donna Wieting, Director of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA Fisheries:
Phone: 301-427-8400

Also, for endangered shortnose sturgeon, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eels: Mr. Sean Mcdermott, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:

E-mail: Sean.mcdermott@noaa.gov

Also at NMFS, protecting shortnose sturgeon and their habitat: Ms. Julie Crocker, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:

E-mail: Julie.crocker@noaa.gov

For federal protection and enforcement of the Clean Water Act on the Connecticut River: Mr. Timothy L. Timmermann Office of Environmental Review, EPA New England Region 1, Boston MA 02109-3912:

E-mail: timmermann.timothy@epa.gov

For all migratory fish and safe passage on the Connecticut including American shad, herring, and endangered sturgeon: Wendi Weber, US Fish & Wildlife Service Region 5, Hadley MA 01035:

E-mail: wendi_weber@usfws.gov

MASSACHUSETTS state officials:

Kathleen Theoharides, Secretary of the MA Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs 100 Cambridge St., Suite 900, Boston, MA 02114:
Main Phone at (617) 626-1000

For Massachusetts clean water and wetland habitat protections on the Connecticut: Mr. Brian Harrington, Bureau of Water Resources Deputy Regional Director, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight Street, Springfield MA 01103:

E-mail: Brian.d.harrington@state.ma.us

Also from MA DEP: Mr. David Cameron, PWS Section Chief, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight St., Springfield, MA 01103:

E-mail: David.cameron@state.ma.us

For state-endangered shortnose sturgeon and all Connecticut River migratory fish in MA: Mr. Jesse Leddick, Chief of Regulatory Review, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:

E-mail: Jesse.Leddick@mass.gov

Also at MA Div. of Fish & Wildlife: Mr. Steven Mattocks, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, Fisheries, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:

E-mail: steven.mattocks.@mass.gov