fish kill on the Connecticut

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“No license to kill”: citizens defend the Connecticut River at its ecosystem graveyard—Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station

Posted by on 06 Feb 2022 | Tagged as: Connecticut River, Connecticut River blog, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River Refuge, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Delaware LLC, E-Comments, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FERC license, FirstLight, fish kill on the Connecticut, Great River Hydro, Greenfield Recorder, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, Nation's best landscaped sewer, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, NMFS, no license to kill, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, PSP Investments, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Greenfield Recorder, The Recorder, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Vermont

In an unrelenting drumbeat of filings to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, citizens throughout the Connecticut Valley are demanding that no new license be issued to Canada-owned FirstLight for their Delaware-tax-sheltered Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station here in Massachusetts.

https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-gyorgy-FirstLightLicensing-44862677

Please read the excellent opinion piece ABOVE from last week’s Greenfield Recorder by Anna Gyorgy, then continue further BELOW to read the latest group of on-the-record citizen filings to FERC insisting that a new license to kill be denied at Northfield Mountain for this venture capital outfit. KEY EXCERPTS from the most recent CORPORATE filings to FERC can be found at the end of this post.

IN THE LATEST INDICATION of the strength of opposition to a new Northfield license FirstLight just missed another self-targeted deadline to have its secret license negotiations with US Fish & Wildlife, MA Dept. of Environmental Protection, MA Division of Fish & Wildlife and the National Marine Fisheres Service all buttoned up and ready to send off for FERC approval.

IN THEIR LENGTHENING FAILURE to put the last nails in this four-state ecosystem’s river-reversing, fish-killing coffin, FL was forced to request “that the Commission continue to defer issuance of its Ready for Environmental Analysis (REA) Notice until after February 28, 2022. FirstLight anticipates requesting the Commission to further defer the REA Notice until after June 30, 2022, to allow the parties time to negotiate a comprehensive, binding settlement agreement that aims to fully resolve all relicensing issues.

THOUGH THIS MAY APPEAR to be merely yet another of FirstLight’s series of month-long delay requests–it’s actually admitting they’ll likely not have this thing safely in their Delaware-registered tax bag until July of 2022 or LATER. What it really says is that they foresee stumbling blocks to getting agreement on allowing the impacts of this river-killer with the public agencies charged with protecting the Connecticut River ecosystem. It’s being negotiated on their watch. They are responsible for defending our so-called, “S.O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge,” our ‘only’ “National Blueway”–and what remains today our drop-dead-deadly, ‘nation’s best landscaped sewer’ right here in Massachusetts.

It is the PEOPLES’ voices that are doing this by writing and filing with FERC:
Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

This is THE PUBLIC’S RIVER! It deserves to LIVE. And, it deserves a real WATCHDOG– YOU!! Thanks to all for raising your voices.

ALSO, this new podcast with OCCUPY THE AIRWAVES on Valley Free Radio:
https://archive.org/details/occupy-the-airwaves-1.17.2022-karl-meyer

BELOW are the latest citizen filings with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission:

Document Accession #: 20220207-5017 Filed Date: 02/07/2022
Pat Graves, South Deerfield, MA.

Many things have changed in recent years. I urge that no relicensing of
FirstLight’s Northfield Mt. Pumped Storage Station take place without
careful consideration of the benefits and harms. At this time it appears
that the harms far outweigh the benefits.

Document Accession #: 20220207-5014 Filed Date: 02/07/2022
Anne Naughton, Shelburne Fls, MA.

Hello,
Please DO NOT renew Firstlight’s lease on the Northfield Mountain Pumped
Storage Project, P-2485.

The Connecticut River is not replaceable. We can get electricity from other,
less destructive sources.

Sincerely,
Anne Naughton
Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts

Document Accession #: 20220204-5174 Filed Date: 02/04/2022
Wayne Pleasant, Turners Falls, MA.
Feb 4, 2022
REF: P-2485 FirstLight vs River Wildlife

Dear FERC
Please deny the license for the Northfield pumped storage system. I have lived on the CT river all my life and have seen first hand the incredible damage that they do to our river.

The system is not “Green Energy.” It consumes more energy that it produces. It is only used for making more money for FirstLight and not to benefit consumers and the environment. It severely damages the shoreline by raising and lowering the water level and thus associated wildlife.

It causes unnatural waterflows that damages and compromises the river environment for endangered Short Nosed Sturgeon.

Sucks up and kills large and small fish through its turbines. No proposed net will stop small fish and associated eggs from being sucked up and killed.

NOTE: If I were to kill this many fish every day I would be arrested for violating protected species rules.

Please do not issue a license to this facility to kill more wildlife.

Thank you,
Wayne
(** NEW filings continue below **)

Document Accession #: 20220204-5027 Filed Date: 02/04/2022
James Terapane, South Deerfield, MA.

I am writing regarding P-2485 Northfield Pump Storage re-licensing process. First off, I am, with many other local citizens, opposed to re-licensing this facility as it currently operates. The disruption of the CT. River ecosystem that this and other First Light Hydro facilities create is
unacceptable.

I demand that FERC allow for public comment as required by Massachusetts DEP review of the re-licensing so that all information related to this process be presented to the public and the citizens of United States be heard. Let’s not forget that First Light is a foreign owned entity whose interests are not necessarily in line with ours, the American Citizens who’s river resources are being borrowed for profit.

We citizens of the Connecticut Valley have worked hard to protect and use our rivers in a sustainable manner and will continue to do so. The idea of the facility being used as a “battery” is a clever pitch but we don’t buy it, not at the cost of the continuing destruction the river ecology. Please don’t cloak this crude way of using the river as “Green”. What is being done to our river is anything but Green Thinking.

Now is the time for bold solutions that secure a reliable power source AND protect our environment. I urge First Light Company, if they must have their battery, to use what ever innovative brain power they have in their company to solve this problem of river and fish destruction otherwise you are not welcome to use our resources.

The people of this region have brought forth many innovative problem solving ideas and pioneered the American Hydro power industry so I urge the managers of First Light to step up to the plate and address how to solve this problem. If they don’t have any ideas we can help them out.

Document Accession #: 20220204-5025 Filed Date: 02/04/2022
Wendy Sibbison, Greenfield, MA.

I oppose the relicensing of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Hydro Storage Station because its immediate and long-lasting harm to the ecology of the river and to its living inhabitants outweigh “both in ethical and economic terms” any benefit to the public of FirstLight’s plan to transport and store energy, far from its source, for later generation at a net energy loss.

AND BELOW ARE DIRECT EXCERPTS FROM FirstLight’s most recent filing with FERC, and–further below that, from Great River Hydro’s filing noting that it is being held back in their relicensing of their non-lethal, Vermont river facilities due to the successive delays requested by PSP Investments-owned, FirstLight at Northfield.

Document Accession #: 20220131-5365 Filed Date: 01/31/2022
Alan Douglass Regulatory Compliance Manager

“FirstLight continues to discuss fish passage, minimum stream flows, and project operational issues with federal and state resource agencies, and certain non-governmental organizations. FirstLight and the agencies have reached conceptual agreement on minimum stream flows, upstream and downstream fish passage facilities, and certain operational measures. The parties are continuing to make progress on the remaining operational measures, at which time they intend to execute an AIP.”

“In light of the significant progress of FirstLight and the relicensing participants in achieving conceptual agreements, FirstLight requests that the Commission continue to defer issuance of its Ready for Environmental Analysis (REA) Notice until after February 28, 2022. FirstLight anticipates requesting the Commission to further defer the REA Notice until after June 30, 2022, to allow the parties time to negotiate a comprehensive, binding settlement agreement that aims to fully resolve all relicensing issues.”

Alan Douglass
Regulatory Compliance Manager

Great River Hydro’s VERNON DAM facilities and its non-lethal fish passage for migrating fish in New Hampshire and Vermont.

BELOW, is text excerpted from GRH’s FERC filing:

Document Accession #: 20220203-5098 Filed Date: 02/03/2022
John L. Ragonese
FERC License Manager
Great River Hydro, LLC

“In the most recent status report, FirstLight Licensees announced conceptual agreements with a number of relicensing participants on several key issues and that they were close to reaching agreement on other key issues. The filing asks the Commission to further defer issuance of the REA Notice until after February 28, 2022, to allow relicensing stakeholders to reach agreements in principle. It also suggests that they intend to request the Commission further delay issuance of the REA Notice until after June 30, 2022, to allow for the development of a binding settlement agreement that the parties. GRH anticipates the Commission would reasonably hold off issuing the REA Notice for at least six months, in order to consider an executed settlement agreement between FirstLight Licensees and stakeholders as a preferred alternative in an amended application.”

“At this point in the process, however, there is no reason for the Commission not to issue the REA Notice for the GRH Projects. Even if the Commission further defers the REA Notice for the FirstLight Projects for another six months, it can still prepare a multi-project environmental impact statement for all five projects.”

“GRH has consulted with federal and state fishery and water quality agencies, and we are authorized to state their support GRH’s request for the Commission to move forward.”

Sincerely,
John L. Ragonese
FERC License Manager

Connecticut River blog: Connecticut River stand up September 18

Posted by on 16 Sep 2021 | Tagged as: American shad, Buz Eisenberg, Clean Water Act, cleanup, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, ESA, fish kill on the Connecticut, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, pumped storage, river cleanup, shad larvae, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, Turner Falls Canal annual draining, WHMP

WHY anyone might choose stand out on the Turners Falls Gill-Montague Bridge over the Connecticut River on Saturday, September 18, 2021, 11 a.m – noon… * ALSO, new WHMP interview with Buz Eisenberg linked below *

dead juvenile Connecticut River shad… Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

PICTURED ABOVE are dead juvenile America shad–easily 150 of them. These are Connecticut River migratory fish that had been lucky enough to escape the treachery of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, just seven miles upriver. There, annually, it’s killer death toll for juvenile shad alone can hit the 2 million mark. So picture a scene like the one above, but multiply it by 100,000 or 200,000, and you start to get a picture of the invisible slaughter that’s never been cleaned up on the Connecticut. Sadly, these hapless juveniles were on their way to the sea when they met their demise in the Turners Falls Power Canal. They died just 300 yards from the dissolving riverbanks of the actual Connecticut River and the desecrated spawning habitat of the federally endangered shortnose sturgeon. Yet more responsibilities and laws flaunted and ignored.

NOTE:There are crucial times when the public has to do the job left undone for a half century after the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act became the law of the land on the Connecticut River. It’s a half dead river carcass in so many ways–a watercourse that does not even meet the definition of a living river in Massachusetts.

Just ask yourself: ON WHOSE WATCH DID THIS OCCUR??

This is a river that’s gone 50 years without a defender. A four-state US Fish & Wildlife Refuge without a single full-time, or part-time staff lawyer dedicated to its daily defense for half a century. The federal and state agencies responsible failed to protect it–and no one held their feet to the fire.

That’s how rivers die. They wither for decades under umbrella organizations that shun and deflect the bedrock necessity to accept a MISSION mandate to INVESTIGATE, ENFORCE and PROSECUTE.

We have a textbook case here:
Where there is no WATCHDOG,there is no ENFORCEMENT.

That’s why someone might choose to stand up for their river on the Turners Falls Bridge on Saturday, Sept. 18, at 11:00. It’s because NO RIVER SHOULD DIE IN THE DARK.

LINKS BELOW:
https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-meyer-StandUpforNERiver-42357321

https://whmp.com/podcasts/the-afternoon-buzz-9-16-21/

ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE NOW:

If you think the Connecticut River ecosystem should be survivable for fish and aquatic animals in all four states–and that New England’s River should meet the basic definition of a living river in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts… Then, DEMAND of these agencies and officials that any new FERC license for the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station (FERC Project # 2485) meet all the requirements of the Clean Water Act, the Rivers and Harbors Act, and all state and federal wetlands protection laws—for the Connecticut River, including safe fish passage mandated in the 1872 Supreme Court decision Holyoke Company v. Lyman. Make them hear you. Name names. Demand the cleanup of a river left comatose for half a century. It is OWED to coming generations.

(*Lots of relicensing and river information and issues notes at www.karlmeyerwriting.com/blog/ )

HERE ARE THE AGENCIES AND NAMES of those responsible for protecting the river ecosystem for future generations. Name them. Write them, then forward that letter to your Congress person and state representative–as well as the local paper. Name names. Let them know you are watching and expect them to do their duty. Finally, send your notes to FERC, using www.ferc.gov. Go to E-comments, make sure you give your name and address and specifically mention “Northfield Mountain, P-2485” when you write. That is the FERC docket number, and it’s required. BUT, mostly, say their names in public–they are working for us. IT WILL BE THEIR LEGACY TOO

ENERGY executives in the private/quasi-public sphere:

Mr. Gordon van Welie, President and CEO, ISO-New England, the “independent” system operator: Phone (413) 540-4220

Mr. Peter Brandien, Vice President of System Operations, ISO-New England:
E-mail: pbrandien@iso-ne.com. NOTE: Mr. Brandien writes the annual support letter that facilitates the daily commercial damage to the Connecticut wrought by the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project.

FEDERAL PUBLIC officials:

For endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, freshwater mussels, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eel: Ms. Donna Wieting, Director of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA Fisheries: Phone: 301-427-8400

Also, for endangered shortnose sturgeon, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eels: Mr. Sean Mcdermott, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:
E-mail: Sean.mcdermott@noaa.gov

Also at NMFS, protecting shortnose sturgeon and their habitat: Ms. Julie Crocker, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:
E-mail: Julie.crocker@noaa.gov

For federal protection and enforcement of the Clean Water Act on the Connecticut River:
Mr. Timothy L. Timmermann Office of Environmental Review, EPA New England Region 1, Boston MA 02109-3912:
E-mail: timmermann.timothy@epa.gov

For all migratory fish and safe passage on the river including American shad, herring, and endangered sturgeon:
Ms. Wendi Weber, US Fish & Wildlife Service Region 5, Hadley MA 01035: E-mail: wendi_weber@usfws.gov

MASSACHUSETTS state officials:

Ms. Kathleen Theoharides, Secretary of the MA Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs 100 Cambridge St., Suite 900, Boston, MA 02114:
Main Phone at (617) 626-1000

For Massachusetts clean water and wetland habitat protections on the Connecticut:
Mr. Brian Harrington, Bureau of Water Resources Deputy Regional Director, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight Street, Springfield MA 01103:
E-mail: Brian.d.harrington@state.ma.us

Also from MA DEP: Mr. David Cameron, PWS Section Chief, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight St., Springfield, MA 01103:
E-mail: David.cameron@state.ma.us

For state-endangered shortnose sturgeon and all Connecticut River migratory fish in MA:
Mr. Jesse Leddick, Chief of Regulatory Review, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:
E-mail: Jesse.Leddick@mass.gov

Also at MA Div. of Fish & Wildlife: Mr. Steven Mattocks, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, Fisheries, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:
E-mail: steven.mattocks.@mass.gov

“Clean, renewable” labels don’t apply

Posted by on 01 Oct 2018 | Tagged as: Ashuelot River, Bellows Falls, blueback herring, canal shad, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, crippled ecosystem, Dead Reach, ecosystem, endangerd shortnose sturgeon, Endangered Species Act, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon, FERC, FERC Commissioner Neil Chatterjee, FERC license, FirstLight, Fish and Aquatics Study Team, fish counts, fish kill, fish kill on the Connecticut, fish passage, fishway windows, Holyoke Fish Lift, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, New Hampshire, NMFS, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Reservoir, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, nuclear power, PSP Investments, Public Law 98-138, pumped storage, Relicensing, resident river fish, Saxtons River, Scott Pruitt, shad, shortnose sturgeon, Society of Environmental Journalists, Turners Falls, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS, Vermont, Vermont Digger, Vermont Yankee

Copyright © 2018 by Karl Meyer All Rights Reserved.

NOTE: the following piece appeared in VTDigger, www.vtdigger.org in September under the heading “Clean, renewable” labels don’t apply when crippling an ecosystem.”

TERMS OF ENTRAINMENT: a Connecticut River History


NOTE:in this photo are over 170 juvenile shad, among the many thousands killed in the recent de-watering of the Turners Falls Power Canal. The power canal is where the bulk of the Connecticut River is diverted into for most months of the year. So, when they drain it, they are killing the river. However, if you look at this photo and multiply that death toll by 10,000 you begin to get some idea of the mortality counts for young-of-the-year shad entrained annually–and un-tallied across nearly five decades, at the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station. (CLICK, then CLICK twice more to enlarge photos.)

At 2:41 p.m. on May 20, 2018, a lone blueback herring appeared in the windows at Turners Falls Dam among a school of larger American shad. It was a small miracle. Barely a foot long, it was the first blueback here since 2005, and there would not be another this spring. Like those shad, its life had already spanned four springs, swimming thousands of ocean miles in shimmering schools. It re-crossed bays and estuaries of seven states and two provinces before reaching this Connecticut River juncture. In doing so it had survived sprawling drift nets and repeated attacks from sharks, bluefish, spiny dogfish, cormorants, seals and striped bass.

All these fish were seeking to spawn and give their young a head start as far upriver as currents, time and temperature would allow. Unfortunately, five miles upstream sat the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, a river vacuuming machine capable of out-killing all their natural predators. For the next 20 miles they’d be vulnerable to its impacts.

NMPS has inhaled river fish of all species and sizes daily for nearly half a century. Results from a river sampling study Juvenile Shad Assessment in the Connecticut River, were released in June by the US Fish & Wildlife Service and MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife. They estimated NMPS’s 2017 operations resulted in losses of some 15 million shad eggs and larvae, plus the deaths of between 1 and 2-1/2 million juvenile shad. That’s for just one species.

On April 20, 1967, years before Northfield was built, federal agencies and four states signed the Statement of Intent for a Cooperative Fishery Restoration Program for the Connecticut River, agreeing to restore runs of American shad, salmon and blueback herring upstream to Bellows Falls, Vermont and beyond. The migratory shortnose sturgeon had already been listed as endangered. Continuing today under Public Law 98-138, its mandate requires utilization of “the full potential of the fishery resources of the Connecticut River including both anadromous and resident species,” providing “high quality sport fishing,” and meeting “the long term needs of the population for seafood.”

American shad are still commercially fished today just 60 miles downriver. They’ve provided seafood to this valley for ages, yet most people in Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts don’t know they were promised a “just share of the fishery harvest” back in 1967. All remain without, while shad continue to grace dinner and restaurant tables in Connecticut every spring.

Running on imported power via the buy-low/sell-high model, Northfield can suck the river into reverse for up to a mile downstream. It devours everything captured in that vortex at 15,000 cubic feet per second. Think 15,000 milk crates, for hours, to fill a 5 billion gallon mountain reservoir. The result is 100% mortality for all fish entrained. During peak-use and/or peak-price times—or both, it sends the deadened water back through its turbines as twice-produced electricity.

NOTE: more of the TF Canal kill here in another location–including mostly juvenile shad, but also a bluegill, several mud-puppies, and a young sea lamprey. Again, this is just a whisper of the year round fish kill occurring upstream at Northfield Mountain.

Northfield was built to run off Vermont Yankee’s excess nuclear megawatts. But even after VY closed in 2014, its carnage continued, unchallenged, rather than being relegated to emergency use. Having never produced a watt of its own power, its 46 years of accumulating carnage are yet to be tallied. That herring might have been heading for New Hampshire’s Ashuelot or Vermont’s Saxtons River, and those shad were perhaps steering for the Great Eddy at Bellows Falls. Regardless, any progeny would later face Northfield’s net-loss-power impacts heading downriver come fall.

Currently it pumps mostly at night when Canadian owners PSP Investments can purchase cheap electricity to suction the river uphill. Later it’s released as second-hand juice at peak-of-the-day profits. Promoters claim the benefits of dispersed solar and wind power can’t be realized without first relaying their renewable energy across the region to this lethal storage machine for later resale in markets far beyond the Connecticut Valley. “Clean, renewable” labels don’t apply when crippling an ecosystem.

NMPS boosters include (now-former) EPA Director Scott Pruitt, who made a sweetheart visit there last Valentine’s Day along with Federal Energy Regulatory Commissioner Neil Chatterjee. That occurred as PSP was requesting to suction yet more water from the Connecticut and applying for a new long-term FERC license. The next day FERC announced a major policy shift, potentially increasing both Northfield’s daytime use and its profits.

Since an 1872 landmark Supreme Court ruling indemnifying Holyoke Dam, all hydro facilities have been required to safely pass the public’s fish, upstream and down. But that 1967 agreement had this warning: “Based on the present fragmentary data available on the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, it appears that this project poses definite limitations to an anadromous fish restoration program. These limitations involve the physical loss of eggs, larvae and young fish of both resident and anadromous species, and an orientation problem for both upstream and downstream migrants attributed to pumping large volumes of water.” Today the 20 mile reach hosting Northfield remains a migration minefield—while some 30 miles of open Vermont/New Hampshire spawning habitat above Vernon Dam sits essentially empty.

Holyoke Dam has annually lifted hundreds of thousands of shad and herring upstream since the 1970s. In 2017 it recorded its second highest shad numbers ever, 537,000 fish. Each spring, half or more of those shad attempt to pass Turners Falls. Less than 10-in-100 will succeed. Of those, some 50% drop from tallies and are never re-counted at Vernon Dam after entering the 20 miles impacted by Northfield. The blueback herring record at Turners Falls was 9,600 in 1986, out of the 517,000 counted 36 miles downstream at Holyoke that year. Of those 9,600 Turners herrings, just 94 reached Vernon Dam. Turners Falls saw another 7,500 blueback herring in 1991; just 383 reappeared upstream at Vernon.

Any new long-term FERC license must comply with federal and state law protecting endangered and public-trust fish. In seeking a new license, PSP’s main proposal for limiting Northfield’s massive carnage has been the test-anchoring of a few yards of Kevlar netting in the riverbed in front of the plant’s suction-and-surge tunnel. Those flag-sized yards of mesh, after a few months deployment, are supposed to effectively model how a 1,000 foot-long “exclusion net”–deployed seasonally in the river over the next decades, might halt the entrainment deaths of out-migrating adult–and millions of juvenile young-of-the year fish, heading back to the sea. Presumably, Northfield’s mouth would remain wide open to the ecosystem’s fish throughout the rest of the year.

In light of longstanding research the US Fish & Wildlife Service, Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission and Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission have set shad passage goals requiring that a minimum of 397,000 pass Turners Falls; and a minimum of 226,000 pass Vernon Dam. It’s a certainty that a new fish lift will be required at Turners Falls under any new license, modeled on the long-term success of Holyoke’s lifts. But the ultimate question is this: can Northfield comply with federal and state law protecting the four-state ecosystem’s fish in order to be granted a new FERC license?

END

Karl Meyer has been a stakeholder and member of the Fish and Aquatics Study Team in the current FERC relicensing process for the Northfield Mountain and Turners Falls projects since 2012. He is a member of the Society of Environmental Journalists.

Connecticut River oil spill and fish kills

Posted by on 20 Sep 2018 | Tagged as: cleanup, Connecticut River, environmental cleanup, fish kill, fish kill on the Connecticut, Greenfield, oil spill, Turners Falls, Turners Falls power canal

Copyright © 2018 by Karl Meyer, All Rights Reserved

Greenfield, MA September 20, 2018. A Greenfield fuel oil spill early Thursday morning extended for nearly a half mile from the ridgetop on Turners Falls Road downhill to the bridge over the Connecticut River and beyond the Green Bridge over the Turners Falls Canal into the Village of Turners Falls. Greenfield DPW members had spread absorbent sand and an officer was warning vehicle operators and cyclists to use caution. But as of 9:00 a.m., no environmental cleanup outfit was on site.

Meanwhile, in the Turners Falls Power Canal many thousands of dead fish remained visible four days after the annual de-watering of the canal–which essentially gets substituted for the main channel of the Connecticut River’s Dead Reach most months of the year. Hundreds of fish were still panicked and dying in the remaining pools in the canal bed. Among the carnage were also mud puppies, tiny sea lamprey, and thousands of freshwater clams. (CLICK, then CLICK again, and AGAIN to enlarge photos)


Sampling of dying fish in the Turners Falls Power Canal

Posted by on 20 Sep 2016 | Tagged as: Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, fish kill on the Connecticut, fish passage, resident river fish, Turner Falls Canal annual draining, Turners Falls power canal, Uncategorized

Below are some examples of the fish found dying in the Turners Falls Power Canal as it underwent its annual draining by FirstLight on September 19, 2016. These were taken in the rain between 7:15 and 7:45 a.m., in one quarter mile reach of the 2.1 mile long conduit. There were thousands of struggling aquatic animals laying prone on the draining sand, from crayfish and freshwater mussels, to chain pickerel. CLICK, then CLICK AGAIN on any photo to enlarge. (Note: all photos Copyright 2016, by Karl Meyer)
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