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Connecticut River: citizens taking a stand to end Northfield Mountain’s half century of killing

Posted by on 02 Apr 2022 | Tagged as: America's best landscaped sewer, Clean Water Act, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Day of Mourning, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FirstLight Power, Greenfield Recorder, Julie Crocker, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Mark Tisa, Martin Suuberg, migratory fish, Mr. Mark S. Tisa, National Marine Fisheries Service, net-loss power, New Hampshire, no license to kill, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, PSP Investments, The Recorder, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, US Supreme Court, USFWS, Vermont, Vermont Digger, VT Digger, Waterkeeper Alliance, Wendi Weber, wrsi.com


The giant sucking intake mouth of FirstLight/PSP Investment’s Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, where it preys on the aquatic life of the Connecticut in three New England states.Photo Copyright © 2022 by Karl Meyer

Things to understand about the current extended (expired April 30, 2018) and proposed FirstLight federal license for Northfield Mountain operations:

* Under commonly occurring conditions, its suction and pumping will continue to force more than 5 miles of the river to flow backwards.

* Northfield Mountain’s daily use will continue to obliterate 100s of millions of fish and aquatic animals annually.

* It’s suction and subsequent regurgitation of a deadened river at over 15,000 cubic feet per second, and 20,000 cubic feet per second respectively, for hours on end, is roughly the equivalent of swallowing all the aquatic life in the 4-story, 19,000 sq. ft. Hawkes and Reed building in Greenfield–one EVERY second, SIXTY every minute, THREE THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED per hour…

The turbines of the pump station suck in life and throw out death,” Shayla Freeland, Gill MA.

The gross megawatts it squanders yearly sucking the river backward could directly power the annual needs of cities and towns up and down this Valley. Instead it will suck out a river’s soul.”
Karl Meyer, Greenfield MA, from the Greenfield Recorder and vtdigger.org.

A There is NO WATCHDOG HERE: interview on THE RIVER ahead of the Connecticut River Day of Mourning.
https://wrsi.com/monte/mourning-the-connecticut-river/

Those seeking a true watchdog model with commitment, staff lawyers and enforcement intent might do well to investigate the Riverkeeper/Waterkeeper organization.

UNDERSTAND: there is no new signed license yet. Only the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission can issue one. FERC itself must ensure that any new license must comply with all existing US environmental laws. This machine does not; and cannot meet those requirements.

The US Supreme Courts decision in 1872 in Holyoke Co. v. Lyman confirmed there must be safe upstream and downstream passage of migratory fish on all US rivers. Canadian-parent owned FirstLight’s proposal fails this.

A river flowing backwards does not meet the standards of the Clean Water Act. You cannot license such impact on a US river.
Northfield Mountain, Northfield MA, where the Connecticut River ecosystem dies… Photo Copyright © 2022, by Karl Meyer

FirstLight’s proposed temporary and flimsy barrier “net” will not even be anchored in the riverbed, and will leave eggs, fish and young of three states exposed to Northfield’s massive suction in their most fragile months of development.

There is nothing in the plan to monitor it daily, below the surface, where the killing occurs. The see-sawing pressure from Northfield and natural river storm flows will very likely leaving it loose and flopping in the current–just as the old net for factory-produced baby salmon did for a quarter century, beginning back in the 1980s. It’s a red herring.

In short, if relicensed, the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, will continue to kill and erase a living Connecticut River ecosystem in Massachusetts daily. It’s uses has been illegal from the day it opened in 1972, a CENTURY after Holyoke Co. v Lyman.

* *GO ON THE RECORD WITH FERC: tell them “no new license to kill.” Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

Then go public, letters, op eds, papers… tell US Fish & Wildlife Service’s Wendi Weber, MA Fish & Wildlife’s Mark Tisa, National Marine Fisheries Julie Crocker, and MA DEP’s Martin Suuberg that
the Connecticut River will not be left to die here in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts… It’s THE PUBLIC’s RIVER.

NO RIVER SHOULD DIE IN THE DARK!

More Connecticut River citizens’ defense

Posted by on 13 Jan 2022 | Tagged as: America's best landscaped sewer, American shad, Clean Water Act, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Connecticut River blog, Connecticut River Conservancy, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Connecticut River Watershed Council, Endangered Species Act, EPA, ESA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FERC license, FirstLight, fish kill, Holyoke Co. v Lyman, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, migratory fish, Nation's best landscaped sewer, National Marine Fisheries Service, NMFS, NOAA, Northeast Utilities, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, NU/WMECO, P-2485, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Source to Sea Cleanup, US Fish & Wildlife Service

THE CONNECTICUT RIVER’S CITIZEN DEFENSE continues:
While FirstLight’s secret January license “settlement” talks continue–centered around leaky net ideas and spit-and-glue window dressing at Northfield Mountain, the public is demanding that its 50 years of devastation cease.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybwy8MBiy9I
* * NOTE: ABOVE is a link to a Wilbraham Public Library ecology lecture series I was asked to take part in last November. The title of my presentation was: “LIVING RIVERS FLOW DOWNSTREAM.” IT IS A KEY HISTORIC PERSPECTIVE to understanding why we live in a broken ecosystem… * *

https://www.gazettenet.com/my-turn-meyer-LastLightCtRiver-44127152

FirstLight led closed-door bargaining with state and federal fish and environment agencies are continuing here in MA, while an ongoing flood of citizen testimony to end Northfield Mountain’s license to kill continues at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

THOSE DEMANDS–from no less than 77 people since November 13th, are also sending a very clear signal to the MA Division of Fish & Wildlife, MA DEP, the US Fish & Wildlife, and National Marine Fisheries Service:

DON’T SELL OUT New England’s Great River for another half-century!

* Read the latest public testimony targeting Northfield lethal ecosystem destruction entered into the FERC record further below.*

BUT FOR THE LONG VIEW, HERE’S A LITTLE ILLUMINATING HISTORY:

Only living rivers flow downstream. But that’s not what you find on the Connecticut River in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Here, 150 years after the US Supreme Court guaranteed safe upstream and downstream passage of migratory fish to and from New Hampshire and Vermont—and a full half century after the enacting of the Clean Water Act and Endangered Species Act, the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station continues to chew-through, reverse and obliterate the key living ecosystem functions of New England’s critical central artery here in northern Massachusetts.

The grim prospects of allowing Northfield to be built were widely known by federal and state agencies half a decade before it began its deadly, net-power loss, river-reversing ecosystem damage. Here, from the same agencies that are today’s MA Fish & Wildlife, US Fish & Wildlife Service, and the National Marine Fisheries Service (the entities still publicly responsible for environmental enforcement and river fish protection), are their words from a key, signed, 1967 document:

“Statement of Intent for a Cooperative Fishery Restoration Program for the Connecticut River Basin”

“Based on the present fragmentary data available on the Northfield Pump Storage Project, it appears that this project poses definite limitations to an anadromous fish restoration program. These limitations involve the physical loss of eggs, larvae, and young fish of both anadromous and resident species, and an orientation problem for both upstream and downstream migrants attributed to pumping large volumes of water. Studies, designed to minimize the potential adverse effects to fishery resources, should be undertaken in development of the design for the Northfield Pump Storage Project. In related studies, fish screens, barriers and deflectors, and flow regimen must be thoroughly investigated.”

Those agencies’ inaction, their failure to protect–while instead indulging in a massive frenzy to recreate an extirpated salmon hybrid in place of a fish not seen here since 1809, proved disastrous for the river’s still-living fish runs and species in this four-state ecosystem. Today, absurdly, a deadly Northfield Mountain soldiers on, while—50 years later those same agencies dicker with foreign owners over emplacing a new band-aid of a barrier net—one full of holes, upstream of that deadly, river-reversing suction.

In the “library” at the Connecticut River Watershed Council—today’s “Conservancy”, there is a boxed, mid-1960s promotional document from WMECO/Northeast Utilities. NU is today does business as Eversource, the perennial chief sponsor of the Conservancy’s Source to Sea Cleanup. That half-century old box contains a glossy booklet promoting the future construction of a Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station. The booklet includes several scenarios and options to premise how of its net-loss power pumping operations might be deployed.

One of them was a glaring red flag for the river, its fish, and an entire ecosystem…

The Watershed Council HQ has a private library within…

THAT SHUTDOWN OPTION, never implemented, was that Northfield’s impacts would be so detrimental to the river and life cycles of its migratory fish that it would have to be shut it down during fish migration season. But here again, no watchdog ever emerged to stand up and fight for a living Connecticut River in Massachusetts. Basically, the only protection ever offered was a net to protect their mythical, teeny, hatchery-bred baby salmon, leaving all the river’s other species to fend for themselves.

Thus Northfield’s gargantuan and lethal water and fish appetite still strangles New England’s four-state ecosystem today. And, half a century later, those same public agencies are allowing a power company to dangle the grim bait of temporary fish barrier net before them once more.

ABOVE IS AN EPA-ORDERED “silt barrier” mandated to be kept in place at FirstLight’s Northfield intake after they were caught flagrantly and clandestinely dumping a mountain of muck directly into the river for over 90 days straight in gross violation of the Clean Water Act. Looking closely, you can see it has FAILED, its anchors useless, and its floats flapping in the breeze along the shoreline downstream of Northfield’s sucking intake. Photo taken 10/2/2010.

Even two years after Northfield came on-line the Federal Power Commission–today’s FERC, still had not been given answers to information they’ requested of WMECO–today’s Eversource, including describing flows on a reversing river. This is a Xeroxed document from FERC:

20010120-0656 FERC PDF (Unofficial) 09/10/2014: January 22, 1974, from the Federal Power Commission to WMECO:

Robert E. Barrett, Jr.,President.
Western Massachusetts Electric Company
West Springfield, Massachusetts 01089

Dear Mr. Barrett:
The Commission staff is presently preparing the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Turners Falls Project (No. 1889) and requests the following information:
(1) In the revised Fxhibit W of the application (page 43, second paragraph), reference is made to the continuing resident fish study being conducted in Turners Falls Reservoir. Please provide a copy of the results obtained since the last Progress Report. If the study has not been completed, please indicate the date you expect a report to be available.

(2) In Exhibit W (pages 19, 20, and Figure 5), the conditions expected to produce flow reversals in the Turners Falls ‘Reservoir as a result of Northfield operation were set forth. Since the Northfield Mountain Project became operational, which of the conditions described have been observed to produce reverse flows? Based on operational experience, are there any observed or anticipated changes in the patterns, durations, or velocities of the flows described therein? Your early response in providing this information would be appreciated.
Very truly yours,
Secretary

On October 16, 1974, WMECO’s lawyers finally replied in the negative to the Federal Power Commission’s questions, stating they still had not implemented the required study which would offer answers to questions about the impacts of reversing the flow of the Connecticut:

“Staff also inquired whether the Company had a study on the effect of hydrology caused by the pumping of Northfield Mountain project this year. The Northfield Licensees have not made a formal study but are accumulating data with respect to Pond elevations, flows and other operating data.”

EVERYBODY KNEW 50 YEARS AGO: yet nobody came to the Connecticut’s rescue…

BUT TODAY CITIZENS are standing up for the living river owed future generations. SEE BELOW for the latest entries into the FERC public record…

BUT FIRST, here’s how it can be done:
Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

HERE ARE THE LATEST:

Document Accession #: 20220111-5033 Filed Date: 01/11/2022
Elizabeth J Erickson, Colrain, MA.

As a long time resident of Franklin County I have for a long time been very concerned about the environmental and ecosystem destruction at Northfield mountain because of the power generating plant there. I have been following the research about the decline in fish populations in the Connecticut River nearby because of the turbines and am strongly opposed to the reicensing of the First Light hydropower plant there. I’m actually shocked that the relicensing is even being considered given all that is now known about how destructive the plant is. Please deny any future license of power generation of Northfield Mountain.

thank you,
Elizabeth Erickson
Colrain, Massachusetts

Document Accession #: 20220111-5005 Filed Date: 01/11/2022
John Hoffman, Shelburne Falls, MA.

I am writing to ask that you deny a continuation of the license for FirstLight Hydro Generating Company. The project began as a way to make use of excess power from the Vernon Nuclear Power Plant. That plant is now closed. This license is now simply a vehicle for FirstLight to use its capitol to make a profit.

That profit comes at the expense of the Connecticut River, one of the glories of New England, and the source of outstanding agricultural soils in the Connecticut River valley. Now that we possess a vastly more sophisticated understanding of river ecology, the damage to the river is elaborately documented.

By sucking large volumes of water out of the river and then disgorging them back, the company erodes the river banks which in turn damages water quality. The turbines through which water is sucked destroy aquatic life, from adult fish, to their young and down to their eggs.

This is a primitive way to treat a river. No company in our present era should be allowed to inflict such damage. This river is a part of the commonwealth of Massachusetts. We the citizens ask you to protect the invaluable ecosystem of our preeminent river and deny FirstLight its license.
Future generations will thank you.

Document Accession #: 20220111-5004 Filed Date: 01/11/2022
Molly Freeland, Gill, MA.

To whom it may concern,
I am a resident of Gill Massachusetts and I request that you do not let Northfield Mountain Pump Station renew their license. The pump station is killing all life it sucks up from the river. Millions of fish are dyeing every year, including endangered short nose sturgeon. The pump station causes major erosion in the river banks which then spreads pollution. The pump station is escalating climate change when we need to be looking to renewable energy sources. Please say no to the pump station for our children, grandchildren, all life and the planet.
Sincerely,
Molly Freeland

Document Accession #: 20220111-5002 Filed Date: 01/11/2022
Irma Lorraine Pearson, Greenfield, MA.

If we, residing in the Democratic heart of our country, cannot save the only large river we have, and all the life in it, we are putting our imprimature on the destruction of our planet for the sake of building private fortunes.

The cautionary tale of Midas and his gold works very well here.
Let’s try another path, of freeing the rivers of dams and reversals, and saving 50% of our ecosystem as wilderness.

NO DEAL: amid public opposition FirstLight’s secret Northfield Mountain settlement plans stumble.

Posted by on 10 Jan 2022 | Tagged as: America's best landscaped sewer, American shad, Canada, Clean Water Act, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Endangered Species Act, EPA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FERC license, FirstLight, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, migratory fish, Nation's best landscaped sewer, NMFS, NOAA, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485, Public Comment period, shad, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, State of Delaware, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS


NO DEAL: amid public opposition FirstLight’s secret Northfield Mountain settlement plans stumble.

Failing in December to secure a secrecy-shrouded agreement, foreign-owned FL petitions FERC again for what’s now an open-ended “Delay of Action/Extension of Time” request. Thus the opportunity for critical public testimony in FL’s Federal Energy Regulatory relicense bid for Northfield remains WIDE OPEN. (**SEE simple FERC filing instructions at end of post)

As scores of public testimony to end Northfield Mountain’s devastation has poured into the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission of late, secret license deals with federal and state fish and agencies here in Massachusetts continue to elude FirstLight Power. The MA Division of Fish & Wildlife, US Fish & Wildlife, MA DEP and the National Marine Fisheries Service–responsible to the public for protecting the Connecticut’s migratory and resident fish, flows, and water quality under established law, are legally empowered with “conditioning authority” to end the half century of slaughter wrought by Northfield’s deadly suctioning. They currently hold the keys to determining if the Commonwealth hosts New England’s river-reversing, ecosystem grim reaper for more decades to come.

Democracy for coming generations means not leaving our river in the hands of a private corporation for ANOTHER half century.

FirstLight filed their latest FERC delay bid on January 4, 2022, the same day as Ethel White of Easthampton filed her FERC testimony stating, “I write concerning the Northfield, MA hydroelectric plant application for recertification. I strongly request that recertification be denied,” Meanwhile, FirstLight, that same day filed a “Continued Request to Defer Issuance of Notice of Acceptance / Ready for Environmental Analysis” with FERC for their Delaware tax-sheltered MA facilities here. Yet, with this latest delay request it appears they’ve discovered their venture capital plans for the Connecticut River are not being swallowed whole here in New England.

Parent-owned by Canadian venture capital giant PSP Investments, FirstLight has once again punted on deadlines in what has now become a decade long slog to continue the massive predation of the region’s key ecosystem artery, after a full half century. In its own January 4, 2022 filing FirstLight again begged FERC for relief of its own previously promised deadlines: “FirstLight requests that the Commission continue to defer issuance of the REA Notice until after January 31, 2022, to allow the parties to focus on the agreement in principle. If the parties are able to reach an agreement in principle by that time, they will then request that the Commission further defer issuance of the REA Notice to allow for negotiation of a fully developed, binding settlement agreement that the parties would submit to the Commission as an offer of settlement pursuant to 18 C.F.R. § 385.602.” An “REA” is FERC-speak for “ready for environmental analysis.”

In its Final License Application FirstLight’s big bid as a concession for the massive sucking fish kill annually at Northfield was a temporary 1,000 foot net, with ¾ inch mesh, to be deployed from upstream, and angled to near its suction tunnels to deflect some of the 24 species of adult fish from its giant, river-reversing vortex. That is literally a year round open door to the obliteration of 100s of millions of eggs and tiny young of developing migratory American shad and the two dozen resident and migrant species of the river—but in particular the key spawning, rearing and out-migrating months between late May and mid-October…

Importantly in that regard, the window for DEMOCRACY on our Connecticut River remains wide open for citizen to go on the public with FERC, and as well in the region’s media. Of late, literally scores of citizens have done just that, in FERC testimony that Northfield’s devastation must end and no new license be offered to FirstLight.

Below is Ethel White’s full January 4th on-the-record testimony, from the same day FL requested more FERC time for their venture capital plans for New England’s Great River, its life, and the future generations who are all entitled to a living ecosystem.

* * But first, here’s how you can stand up, on-the-record, in this critical time for the Connecticut River’s future:

GO TO: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

Document Accession #: 20220104-5000 Filed Date: 01/04/2022
Ethel S. White, Easthampton, MA.

I write concerning the Northfield, MA hydroelectric plant application for recertification. I strongly request that recertification be denied. Your commission’s decisions are key to how we deal with climate change. The vast majority of Americans believe that climate change is one of the top issues of today, if not THE top issue. We are on the brink of losing our planet’s ability to sustain human life, and large hydroelectric plants are not beneficial to rivers, aquatic life, or human existence. The Connecticut River is a vital artery in New England, and losing it to environmental degradation would be a tragedy. I hope the Commission will regulate this particular energy source in the proper way, by closing it down.
Sincerely, Ethel S. White

* * Agency heads and personnel representing the public trust:

wendi_weber@fws.gov, Director Region 5 US Fish & Wildlife Service; andrew.tittler@sol.doi.gov, lead council at the table for USFWS; melissa_grader@fws.gov, at the table for our migratory fish; julie.crocker@noaa.gov, National Marine Fisheries Service Endangered Fish Recovery Branch Chief (endangered sturgeon); william.mcdavitt@noaa.gov, at the table for our migratory fish; mark.tisa@state.ma.us, Director of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, jesse.leddick@state.ma.us, Chief of Regulatory Review MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife.

A Connecticut River extinction rebellion

Posted by on 30 Dec 2021 | Tagged as: American shad, blueback herring, Clean Water Act, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Death-Sewer, Delaware LLC, E-Comments, Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, Extinction Rebellion, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FERC Comments, FERC licensing process, FirstLight, FISH and Wildlife Refuge??, Holyoke Co. v Lyman, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Massachusetts DEP, Massachusetts Division of Fish & Wildlife, Nation's best landscaped sewer, National Marine Fisheries Service, NMFS, NOAA, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Reservoir, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, nuclear power, P-2485, pumped storage, right-to-know, shad larvae, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, State of Delaware, US Fish & Wildlife Service, USFWS

A VIRTUAL CONNECTICUT RIVER extinction rebellion has been taking place in the region over the last 10 days. Since December 20, 2021, over three dozen people have gone on the record with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission stating, unequivocally–and in the clearest terms, that NO new license should be issued for the continued operation of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station by FirstLight. You can read testimony from the latest thirteen people in the text that follows.

Many have taken this action upon being apprised of some of the most basic information about the high stakes games for the Connecticut’s four-state ecosystem being played out behind closed doors right now. Many learned of this through my Opinion piece, “Last light for New England’s Great River” that appeared in the Daily Hampshire Gazette and The Recorder on December 2oth and 21sth, https://www.gazettenet.com/my-turn-meyer-LastLightCtRiver-44127152 .

It outlined the perilous place our ecosystem is teetering in as “confidential” final license settlement negotiations between Canada-owned FirstLight and MA Division of Fish & Wildlife, MA Div. of Environmental Protection, the US Fish & Wildlife Service and NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries have been taking place during this month.

This citizen action has galvanized amidst the great void of leadership and wholesale lack of enforcement of any and all state and federal environmental statutes on the Connecticut River in Massachusetts these last 49 years. It’s been a half century of predation on a Connecticut River wholly lacking in a watchdog–in a state where a devastated 23 mile-long ecosystem reach literally flows backwards for miles at times, and virtually millions of resident and migratory fish are been obliterated, annually by the massive, daily, energy-squandering suction of Northfield Mountain’s turbines in their venture capital electricity resale boondoggle.

juvenile Connecticut River shad, dead

* *and this killing is NOTHING compared to the millions of juvenile fish extinguished at Northfield annually. Shad a just one species out of two dozen inhaled and obliterated there–an annual extirpation of literally hundreds of millions of juvenile and adult fish, eggs, and aquatic creatures each year.

Today in Massachusetts the Connecticut River at Northfield remains the deadliest “Nation’s best landscaped sewer”–far more drop-dead-deadly for fish and aquatic life than in the decades prior to the Clean Water Act.

I’m certain, if this river had a voice it would be raising it now to say thank you to the folks below, and the many others, who are taking a stand to save the soul of this ancient ecosystem. To read their words, please follow down.

* * ALSO, as we are at the holiday break, there is STILL time to enter your own on-the-record testimony to FERC. This ecosystem does not belong to FirstLight, or the Commonwealth, or the “environmental” agencies that have so long failed to protect it. It belongs to the children of the future. HERE’S HOW TO ENTER YOUR TESTIMONY:Go to: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

THIS is the giant mess in 2010 made when Northfield operators failed at flushing out the accumulated muck, detritus, and death that had been sucked up from the river into their 4 billion gallon reservoir for years. They clogged their mile-long suction tunnels with several feet of mud, and later got caught and ordered to CEASE AND DESIST by the EPA, after dumping truck-load after truck-load of polluting muck directly into the river for over 90 days straight. In direct violation of the CLEAN WATER ACT. This is the MASSIVE RIVER DREDGING OPERATION the EPA ordered. Northfield went down for over HALF a year, yet everyone’s lights stayed on…

* AND HERE ARE THOSE WORDS OF SOME OF THE OTHER FOLKS CURRENTLY TAKING A STAND:


Document Accession #: 20220103-5000 Filed Date: 01/03/2022
Laura Kaye, Northfield, MA.

Dear Commissioners,
I would like to add my voice to those of my neighbors and fellow citizens of Massachusetts, who have written many thousands of words to you in support of our great Connecticut River, which has been so adversely impacted by the pumping station in Northfield – from the waste of energy from fossil fuels burned to send water uphill just so it can flow down back into the river, to the destruction of fish, and more recently impacting our tax base. Please read the detailed comments that so many people have sent to you and DO NOT approve the re licensing of the Northfield Mountain Pumping Station. For the people and the environment upon which we depend for our continuing survival.

Document Accession #: 20211230-5080 Filed Date: 12/30/2021
Mary Hall, South Hadley, MA.

I am seeking to comment on FirstLight’s relicensing bid for the NorthfieldMountain Pumped Storage Station on the Connecticut River.

I consider it is past time for that Pumping Storage Station to cease operation. The ecological costs of operation, as detailed by Karl Meyer of Greenfield, Mary J. Metzger of Westfield, and others is far too great for continued use of this facility to be justifiable.

Mr. Meyer explains how, in order to continue operations, FirstLight has undertaken to avoid tax payments for its use. In the event the facility was economically viable, it would not be necessary to obtain a tax shelter for it to continue to operate.

The Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station is a giant counterbalance to all of our efforts to maintain and restore our Connecticut River ecosystem. There is nothing anyone can do in advocacy for fish and other aquatic life that can remedy the harm that the Storage Station produces. To say again: The fact that FirstLight thought they needed a tax shelter for the Storage Station testifies to the fact that, even as a business, it is not economically viable.

I ask FERC to deny FirstLight’s bid to relicense the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station for the sake of all aquatic life in our beloved Connecticut River ecosystem.

Document Accession #: 20211230-5007 Filed Date: 12/30/2021
Laura Doughty, Wendell, MA.
RE: Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings FERC Project Number P-2485

I urge FERC in the strongest possible terms: Please do NOT relicense First Light’s Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage facility. If we are to have anychance at keeping a livable planet, we must start *now* to use wiser and more efficient energy storage technologies. It is ridiculous to let this
corporation use far more energy than it can ever create so that it can perpetuate its business model of buying low and selling high. From an energy conservation point of view it makes no sense, but when one considers the vast ecological damage this facility has been allowed to inflict, it is shameful that it has not been shut down long ago. Please do what is right for our river, and for our planet.

Document Accession #: 20211230-5000 Filed Date: 12/30/2021
James Smethurst, Deerfield, MA.

I am writing to oppose the relicensing of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage. It has had a devastating impact on aquatic species in the Connecticut River, some of which, like the shortnose sturgeon, are endangered. It serves no useful purpose other than to provide profits for out of state investors. It is not a renewable energy source, but actually an energy drain, given the power required to pump water from the river uphill. The nuclear power plant whose excess energy Northfield Mountain was supposed to repurpose is no more. It is time to close it down.

James Smethurst
5 Pleasant Avenue
Deerfield, MA

Document Accession #: 20211229-5002 Filed Date: 12/29/2021
Rebecca Robbins, Williamsburg, MA.
Dear FERC,

I am concerned about the fish and other aquatic life that get ground to bits at the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station. Please do not relicense this facility without ensuring the health of the river and the creatures that live in it.

Thank you,
Rebecca Robbins
Williamsburg, MA

Document Accession #: 20211229-5000 Filed Date: 12/29/2021
Betsy Browning, Colrain, MA.

I am writing to voice my opposition to the relicensing of the Northfield Mountain Pump Storage facility. I have learned so much by reading the other letters that I feel morally obligated to add my voice. I grew up within a mile of the French King Bridge and remember the Northfield Mountain project being built. Both Northfield and Erving had great enthusiasm for the bountiful tax money they grew to rely on.

For 49 years the pump storage process has been decimating fish and wildlife along the Connecticut River. Amidst our climate crisis and the threats to species, this living river deserves our protection. Ironically this area is part of the Silvio Conte Fish and Wildlife protected area.

That FirstLight is a subsidiary of Canada owned power company and that they have moved their corporate assets for Northfield Pump Storage and the Turners Falls Hydroelectric to Delaware to avoid Massachusetts taxes, clearly shows their primary goal is maximum profit.

I understand its original plan was to use the excess power from the nuclear plant at Vernon which is now defunct. So using power generated by other means to pump water uphill is now wasteful of resources, outdated, and
impractical.

Someone voiced the brilliant idea that the mountain could be converted to a vast solar site.

Renewing a 50-year license should be unthinkable knowing both the environmental crisis in our midst and the current environmental damage that is occurring daily from the pump storage process.

Document Accession #: 20211229-5084 Filed Date: 12/29/2021
Paul Richmond, WENDELL, MA.

I have a questions why is First Light Power going to sign a new contract
which allows them to continue to use an old technology, which is destroying
the CT River and all life in it. I am speaking of the pumping stations, which sucks up everything in the river and kills it to be pumped out when energy is needed. Storage has been an age old question since we started producing energy. When you have access how to store it. When there was access Nuclear electricity at night when it is consider cheap, they would pump up the water to then release it when they needed electricity at peek times for more money. A reasonable idea if you are an energy company trying to make a profit. Then there is the method you use to do that. Today there are much better batteries being spurred on by alternative energy to address when the sun is shining or the wind is blowing. So why isn’t First Light being asked to stop the old method which was and is destroying the river and store the access energy in batteries, or compressed air storage in the new contract they are about to sign with the state. Please do not sign a new agreement with this in it.

Document Accession #: 20211228-5069 Filed Date: 12/28/2021
Sid Siff, Amherst, MA.

I am writing to oppose the rel icensing of FirstLight’s Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage facility on the Connecticut River. At the time of its inception in 1972, it was considered a renewable energy resource, and in 1975 I visited the site on a field trip for a Natural Resource class I was taking at UMass. There was much banter about the benefits of taking ‘extra’ energy from the nearby Vermont Yankee Power Plant in Vernon, and using it to pump water out of the Connecticut River and up to the top of Northfield Mountain, where it was stored and released to spin giant turbines, thereby creating ‘clean’ energy at times of peak demand. Since that time, not only has the nuclear plant been decommissioned, requiring fossil fuel based energy to operate the pumps, but it is well documented that the effect on the ecosystem of the river has been devastating. Multiple species of aquatic life are sucked out of the river in large numbers and killed, on a daily basis. The river acts as a narrow tidal basin, causing extreme bank erosion. The flow of the river is disrupted, leading to inadequate water levels downstream, and a resulting inability of fish to reach critical spawning habitat. Add to this the fact that the facility uses more energy than it creates, it is clearly not, and never was, a source of renewable energy.

Furthermore, FirstLight has demonstrated a clear disregard for not only every living species in the river ecosytem, but also for the people of Massachusetts, by registering Northfield Mountain and Turner’s Falls hydroelectric facilities into Delaware tax shelters, depriving Massachusetts of any tax revenue.

Perhaps by creating a closed loop system, with a reservoir at the bottom of the mountain that is completely separated from the river, and using any excess offshore wind energy to operate the pumps, Northfield Mountain could be a viable energy source going forward. But in its current state, it’s an outdated, dangerous and extremely harmful and wasteful behemoth that should be put to rest.

Document Accession #: 20211228-5066 Filed Date: 12/28/2021
Graham Hayward, NORTHFIELD, MA.

I do not want First Light’s bid for re-licensing to be approved. All they’ve done behind benefit of closed doors must be moved out into the light of day and a public forum.

This is one of many matters that won’t “fly” anymore and all those involved will be dealt with, these days of theft are over.
Thank you,
Graham Hayward

Document Accession #: 20211228-5065 Filed Date: 12/28/2021
Betsy Corner, Shelburne Falls, MA.
Concerning P-2485 for Northfield Mountain

For the past 50 years I’ve witnessed and read about the damage that the Northfield Mountain Pump Storage facility has caused to the Connecticut River and its inhabitants. Certainly common sense tells us that the kind of system that uses more energy than it produces is antiquated and foolish. It’s clear that relicensing this facility would be done in the financial interests of the owner of the corporation that seems to have power over those who are involved in granting another 50 year long license. Residents of the Connecticut Valley must have a transparent licensing process, not the closed door one that has been on-going. It’s high time to protect the river’s ecology and to look at the big picture of money and politics as it affects all of us in this decision.

Document Accession #: 20211228-5058 Filed Date: 12/28/2021
Dave Dersham, Northampton, MA.

I write to you concerning project number P-2485:
The kinetic energy that FirstLight consumes to push the Connecticut river
backwards and up Northfield Mountain, exceeds the potential energy eventually gained.

Simultaneously, 10s of thousands of small fry become pulverized by being
sucked into the hydro electric turbines placed at the midpoint of this
convoluted design. The result is essentially an aquatic Rube Goldberg killing machine, despite the substandard netting placed in the river meant to divert the inexorable fate of the baby fish.

This procedure, which has been going on for decades, is the exact opposite of sustainability both energetically and ecologically ” and needs to
finally stop.

FirstLight does not deserve to be granted another 50 year license.
Thank you for your attention,
Dave Dersham

Document Accession #: 20211228-5048 Filed Date: 12/28/2021
Garrett D Connelly, Greenfield, MA.

Hello,
I am writing this request that you revoke First Light’s operation permit for the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Facility so that you know one more person stands against United States policies that disregard life on Earth and serve only short term profit. And in this case it is a false profit.

FERC employees know short-term profits are small relative to the economic
benefits of a clean and free flowing Connecticut river as well as I do,
probably much better. For this reason I won’t try to fit a list of economic
and environmental benefits from a clean and free flowing river and simply
describe what clear thinking people in the future might do instead.

Visualize a line of pollution sensors across a free flowing river that is so clean it has become a world renowned tourist destination. One of the sensors registers a trace of some cancer inducing chemical and enlightened employees of a future country that cares about life spring into action. Chemical sensors follow the pollution to its source and the activity causing it is stopped and cleaned up.

We all know the energy used by consumer societies is leading to extinction of human life on Earth. The wealth generated by free flowing clean rivers can only happen when energy regulators know how much energy is required by a modern and healthy nation. FERC knows far better than I that the real economy does not require a fake enterprise destroying river life for unreal paper profits so I stop here.

Please think about it from a pro-life perspective and then deny the permit to operate a fake business that destroys real life. Deny the permit that allows operation of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Facility.
Sincerely,
Garrett Connelly

Document Accession #: 20211227-5224 Filed Date: 12/27/2021
Robert F Porzio, Putney, VT.
Bob Porzio, Putney VT

Dear Federal Energy Regulatory Commission,
Please do not grant a new federal license for the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, P-2485. This plant has done huge damage to the river for the last half century, reversing flows and killing fish while squandering massive
amount of energy. As a Vermont resident it is unacceptable to allow this machine to kill migrating fish that should be reaching our section of river, but are swallowed by this deadly plant on their upstream and downstream travels. We folks upstream are entitled to a thriving river and a share of its migratory fish.

Thank you,
Robert Porzio
Putney VT

Connecticut River blog: Connecticut River stand up September 18

Posted by on 16 Sep 2021 | Tagged as: American shad, Buz Eisenberg, Clean Water Act, cleanup, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, ESA, fish kill on the Connecticut, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, pumped storage, river cleanup, shad larvae, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The Recorder, Turner Falls Canal annual draining, WHMP

WHY anyone might choose stand out on the Turners Falls Gill-Montague Bridge over the Connecticut River on Saturday, September 18, 2021, 11 a.m – noon… * ALSO, new WHMP interview with Buz Eisenberg linked below *

dead juvenile Connecticut River shad… Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

PICTURED ABOVE are dead juvenile America shad–easily 150 of them. These are Connecticut River migratory fish that had been lucky enough to escape the treachery of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, just seven miles upriver. There, annually, it’s killer death toll for juvenile shad alone can hit the 2 million mark. So picture a scene like the one above, but multiply it by 100,000 or 200,000, and you start to get a picture of the invisible slaughter that’s never been cleaned up on the Connecticut. Sadly, these hapless juveniles were on their way to the sea when they met their demise in the Turners Falls Power Canal. They died just 300 yards from the dissolving riverbanks of the actual Connecticut River and the desecrated spawning habitat of the federally endangered shortnose sturgeon. Yet more responsibilities and laws flaunted and ignored.

NOTE:There are crucial times when the public has to do the job left undone for a half century after the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act became the law of the land on the Connecticut River. It’s a half dead river carcass in so many ways–a watercourse that does not even meet the definition of a living river in Massachusetts.

Just ask yourself: ON WHOSE WATCH DID THIS OCCUR??

This is a river that’s gone 50 years without a defender. A four-state US Fish & Wildlife Refuge without a single full-time, or part-time staff lawyer dedicated to its daily defense for half a century. The federal and state agencies responsible failed to protect it–and no one held their feet to the fire.

That’s how rivers die. They wither for decades under umbrella organizations that shun and deflect the bedrock necessity to accept a MISSION mandate to INVESTIGATE, ENFORCE and PROSECUTE.

We have a textbook case here:
Where there is no WATCHDOG,there is no ENFORCEMENT.

That’s why someone might choose to stand up for their river on the Turners Falls Bridge on Saturday, Sept. 18, at 11:00. It’s because NO RIVER SHOULD DIE IN THE DARK.

LINKS BELOW:
https://www.recorder.com/my-turn-meyer-StandUpforNERiver-42357321

https://whmp.com/podcasts/the-afternoon-buzz-9-16-21/

ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE NOW:

If you think the Connecticut River ecosystem should be survivable for fish and aquatic animals in all four states–and that New England’s River should meet the basic definition of a living river in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts… Then, DEMAND of these agencies and officials that any new FERC license for the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station (FERC Project # 2485) meet all the requirements of the Clean Water Act, the Rivers and Harbors Act, and all state and federal wetlands protection laws—for the Connecticut River, including safe fish passage mandated in the 1872 Supreme Court decision Holyoke Company v. Lyman. Make them hear you. Name names. Demand the cleanup of a river left comatose for half a century. It is OWED to coming generations.

(*Lots of relicensing and river information and issues notes at www.karlmeyerwriting.com/blog/ )

HERE ARE THE AGENCIES AND NAMES of those responsible for protecting the river ecosystem for future generations. Name them. Write them, then forward that letter to your Congress person and state representative–as well as the local paper. Name names. Let them know you are watching and expect them to do their duty. Finally, send your notes to FERC, using www.ferc.gov. Go to E-comments, make sure you give your name and address and specifically mention “Northfield Mountain, P-2485” when you write. That is the FERC docket number, and it’s required. BUT, mostly, say their names in public–they are working for us. IT WILL BE THEIR LEGACY TOO

ENERGY executives in the private/quasi-public sphere:

Mr. Gordon van Welie, President and CEO, ISO-New England, the “independent” system operator: Phone (413) 540-4220

Mr. Peter Brandien, Vice President of System Operations, ISO-New England:
E-mail: pbrandien@iso-ne.com. NOTE: Mr. Brandien writes the annual support letter that facilitates the daily commercial damage to the Connecticut wrought by the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project.

FEDERAL PUBLIC officials:

For endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, freshwater mussels, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eel: Ms. Donna Wieting, Director of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA Fisheries: Phone: 301-427-8400

Also, for endangered shortnose sturgeon, as well as American shad, blueback herring and American eels: Mr. Sean Mcdermott, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:
E-mail: Sean.mcdermott@noaa.gov

Also at NMFS, protecting shortnose sturgeon and their habitat: Ms. Julie Crocker, Greater Atlantic Region Fisheries Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, Gloucester, MA 01930:
E-mail: Julie.crocker@noaa.gov

For federal protection and enforcement of the Clean Water Act on the Connecticut River:
Mr. Timothy L. Timmermann Office of Environmental Review, EPA New England Region 1, Boston MA 02109-3912:
E-mail: timmermann.timothy@epa.gov

For all migratory fish and safe passage on the river including American shad, herring, and endangered sturgeon:
Ms. Wendi Weber, US Fish & Wildlife Service Region 5, Hadley MA 01035: E-mail: wendi_weber@usfws.gov

MASSACHUSETTS state officials:

Ms. Kathleen Theoharides, Secretary of the MA Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs 100 Cambridge St., Suite 900, Boston, MA 02114:
Main Phone at (617) 626-1000

For Massachusetts clean water and wetland habitat protections on the Connecticut:
Mr. Brian Harrington, Bureau of Water Resources Deputy Regional Director, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight Street, Springfield MA 01103:
E-mail: Brian.d.harrington@state.ma.us

Also from MA DEP: Mr. David Cameron, PWS Section Chief, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 436 Dwight St., Springfield, MA 01103:
E-mail: David.cameron@state.ma.us

For state-endangered shortnose sturgeon and all Connecticut River migratory fish in MA:
Mr. Jesse Leddick, Chief of Regulatory Review, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:
E-mail: Jesse.Leddick@mass.gov

Also at MA Div. of Fish & Wildlife: Mr. Steven Mattocks, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, Fisheries, 1 Rabbit Hill Rd., Westborough MA 01581:
E-mail: steven.mattocks.@mass.gov

Connecticut River blog: Is it a river at all? Sucked to Death–upstream and down…

Posted by on 17 Aug 2021 | Tagged as: Buz Eisenberg, Clean Water Act, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, ISO-NEW ENGLAND, Landmark Supreme Court Decision 1872, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Massachusetts DEP, net-loss power, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, Peskeomscutt Island, Relicensing, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Turners Falls dam, US Supreme Court, Vermont, WHMP

IS IT A RIVER AT ALL? * * MY TALK WITH ATTORNEY BUZ EISENBERG ON WHMP’S “AFTERNOON BUZZ” Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer
* Full links and topics below
*


STARVED! THE CONNECTICUT FROM THE TURNERS FALLS BRIDGE ON THE MORNING OF THE POCUMTUCK HOMELANDS FESTIVAL–TAKING PLACE JUST 200 YARDS UPSTREAM. THE LITTLE BUMP IN THE MIDDLE IS PESKEOMSCUTT ISLAND–WITHOUT WATER, NO ISLAND AT ALL…Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

NOTE: (please read through the questions, illustration link, and topics below, then click for the podcast link, here, or one at the bottom of the page) https://whmp.com/podcasts/the-afternoon-buzz-8-10-21/

* The Connecticut River is wrenched to a dead stop in Massachusetts daily. It’s literally a heart attack to the ecosystem. But wait, there’s MORE..!

* For up to 4 months out of the year the river’s median natural routed flow is far less than the 15,000 cubic-feet-per-second massive suction of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project’s four giant turbines pulling at its current. What does this mean?

* Well, it means that there is no living river—because NMPS actually pulls the current into reverse and UPSTREAM for over 3 miles. This is a heart attack, followed by a stroke…

(* CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW FOR A GRAPHIC FROM THE FERC PUBLIC RECORDS SHOWING THE CONNECTICUT PULLED BACKWARD–ARROWS HEADING UPSTREAM TOWARD THE INVISIBLE THROAT OF THE NORTHFIELD MOUNTAIN PUMPED STORAGE STATION, OVER 3 MILES AWAY. NOTE FRENCH KING BRIDGE IN 1ST PHOTO; AND FRANKLIN COUNTY TECH/TF INDUSTRIAL PARK IN THE 2ND*)

*20160301-2015Pages from 3.3.9_appendix_B_Velocity-2*

* Is THIS a RIVER??? *

* Learn how Northfield, a massive energy CONSUMER, squanders enough energy to power all of the housing units in metro-Boston annually—plus those of Franklin County, and nearly all those in Hampshire County, while killing a 4 state ecosystem…

* Hear how Northfield has never met the legal basic safe passage requirements for migratory fish—upstream and down, as it kills millions of juvenile shad in direct violation of the 1872 landmark US Supreme Court decision in Holyoke Company v. Lyman.

* Is the Connecticut even a river in Massachusetts? It meets NONE of the basic definitions of a river from any source or legal dictionary. It is denied it’s NATURAL FLOW; it does not run DOWNSTREAM; it does not flow to the SEA; and it is literally untethered from the pull of GRAVITY…

* Does it meet even basic EPA or Clean Water Act standards—in the Commonwealth or on the Navigable Waters of the United States?

* Why was Northfield not stopped before it got started?

* Why wasn’t it put to bed the moment Vermont Yankee shut down?

* The Connecticut is a river without a watchdog. This is the ecosystem’s critical artery, yet one without a single lawyer dedicated to its defense these last 69 years, while some falsely lay claim to being its protector…

Thanks to Buz and WHMP radio https://whmp.com/podcasts/the-afternoon-buzz-8-10-21/

THE GREAT FAILURE TO PROTECT

Posted by on 22 May 2021 | Tagged as: Cabot Woods, Clean Water Act, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Conte National Fish & Wildlife Refuge, Endangered Species Act, Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, ESA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chairman, FERC Commissioner Richard Glick, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, Julie Crocker, Kathleen Theoharides, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, MA Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program, Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection, Monte Belmonte, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Nipmuck, NMFS, Norwottuck, P-1889, P-2485, Pocumtuck, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, Section 9–Prohibition of Take Section 9(a)(1), Shortnose Stout, shortnose sturgeon, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, State of Delaware, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey, Wendi Weber, wrsi.com

THE GREAT FAILURE TO PROTECT: Flaunting the Endangered Species Act and Other federal and state laws governing clean water and habitat on the Connecticut River at Rock Dam in Massachusetts


Photo credit: US Geological Service

FirstLight’s Turners Falls and Cabot Station under the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission License #: FERC P-1889.

The ROCK DAM spawning nursery on the Connecticut River: the ONLY documented NATURAL spawning site for the ONLY FEDERALLY-ENDANGERED MIGRATORY FISH on the Connecticut River: the CONNECTICUT RIVER SHORTNOSE STURGEON.


Desiccating and baking shortnose sturgeon nursery habitat in the Connecticut River at the Rock Dam pool on May 21, 2021.
Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The FEDERAL ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, Section 9: the term “TAKE” MAKES IT ILLEGAL TO: “to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect, or to attempt to engage in any such conduct.”

Other federal and state laws NOT being ENFORCED on the Connecticut River at this critical habitat: the CLEAN WATER ACT, THE WETLANDS PROTECTION ACT, and, the Supreme Court’s 1872 landmark environmental decision for the Connecticut River in Holyoke Company v. Lyman—mandating that private operators of dams and facilities on the Connecticut—and thence for all rivers, must provide safe upstream and downstream passage for migratory fish.

A red slurry enters the Connecticut at the Rock Dam

Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

When there is no WATCHDOG, there is no ENFORCEMENT.

THE: federal and state agencies and leaders responsible for implementation, protection and enforcement of laws and conditions protecting spawning, habitat, life-cycle and survival of the Connecticut River’s sole federal and state endangered migratory fish: THE CONNECTICUT RIVER SHORTNOSE STURGEON

THEIR NAMES:

Phil Glick, Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission:
Julie Crocker: Branch Chief, Endangered Fish Recovery unit, NOAA, Gloucester MA (
Kathleen Theoharides: Sec. of MA Energy & Environmental Affairs
Martin Suuberg: Commissioner MA Department of Environmental Protection
Ron Amidon: Commissioner MA Dept. of Fish & Game
Daniel McKiernan: Director MA Division of Marine Fisheries
Wendi Weber: Director Region 5, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Here is a link to further discussion of testing the connection between the TF Canal and grim sludge at Rock Dam–w/Monte Belmonte, WRSI.com
https://wrsi.com/monte/how-to-save-the-shortnose-sturgeon/

When there is no WATCHDOG, there is no ENFORCEMENT.

Of Book Bans, Journalism and Shortnose Stout

Posted by on 06 Mar 2021 | Tagged as: Alden Booth, Andrew Fisk, Barnaby Watten, Bob Flaherty, Clean Water Act, Congressman John Olver, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Conservancy, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, critical habitat, Dr. Boyd Kynard, Endangered Species Act, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeion, FERC, FirstLight Power, Fish and Aquatics Study Team, journalism, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Monte Belmonte, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, Shortnose Stout, Silvio O. Conte Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, The People's Pint, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, Uncategorized, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey's Conte Fish Lab, WHMP, WRSI

Of Book Bans, Journalism and Shortnose Stout: a brief history of science, censorship and the short, noble life of a beer created to help stop corporate abuse on the Connecticut River Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

(NOTE: for a WHMP podcast with Host Bob Flaherty related to this story go here: https://whmp.com/morning-news/sturgeon-stout-has-come-gone-but-the-harm-to-the-sturgeons-spawning-ground-continues/ )

A red slurry enters the Connecticut at the Rock Dam

Nearly a decade back retired federal fisheries biologist Dr. Boyd Kynard was putting the finishing touches on a book entitled Life History and Behaviour of Connecticut River Shortnose and Other Sturgeons. It was a compilation of sturgeon research conducted by federal biologists and university researchers—largely based locally on the Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon. Its findings described the shortnose sturgeon’s life history and habitat needs on the river from below Holyoke Dam, all the way to a spawning site known as the Rock Dam. The ancient Rock Dam site is just a few hundred yards from the USGS Conte Lab in Turners Falls where Kynard had spent a chunk of his career.

The sturgeon book authored by Kynard et al

Just as Kynard’s book was going to print in Germany, published by the World Sturgeon Conservation Society, Boyd Kynard and Harold Rosenthal, its editors, received word from the US Geological Service that two chapters of the book were being “recalled” for “editorial” reasons, and all publication would need to be halted in the United States and abroad. The reasons given were rather murky at the time—some were vague stylistic preferences. Kynard immediately smelled a rat. He believed that the two chapters thrown into question were being stymied because they used the term “river regulation” as a key factor in the spawning failure of the shortnose sturgeon here—the only federally endangered migratory fish in the Connecticut River system and one that spawned on the doorstep of the USGS Conte Lab.

The term river regulation was accurate, precise and descriptive. It referred to conditions created when the power company, just upstream, either inundated or starved the bed of the Connecticut River via operation of its Turners Falls Dam. The dam is operated in response to the massive river disruption created when the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, a giant, net-loss energy contraption just upstream, either suctioned or spewed huge pulses of water in and out of the riverbed. This grim industrial model literally cripples the ancient flows of this ecosystem, killing millions of fish outright, while creating spawning conditions for shortnose sturgeon that cause spawning failure most years at Rock Dam. The Rock Dam, confirmed by Kynard’s research, is the only documented natural spawning site on the river. It appeared the USGS did not want something put in print that directly stated those facts—one that led straight back to the actions of a corporation.

As a journalist I’d already spent many hours with Boyd Kynard, asking questions about sturgeon, shad, and river conditions. We’d had many a fine discussion over breakfast and coffee, often lasting two hours and more. The idea that the book’s information was being embargoed, censored, really hit a sour note about free speech, freedom of information and interfering with the facts and data of research science. Along with Dr. Kynard, several of the ten co-authors of the book’s chapters from various labs and universities cried foul.

The US Geological Service actually caused the book’s publication to be banned for a brief time in Europe, but the publishers ultimately decided they would not be bowed by the politics of a foreign federal agency. They resumed printing and selling the book. Here in the United State, USGS held tight to their recall and vague objections to the book’s science. Compiled and written by Kynard and fellow researchers, The Life History and Behaviour of Connecticut River Shortnose and Other Sturgeons was essentially banned—with no schedule for those USGS’s loose objections to be resolved. Months passed as the silencing of federal and state research science and the work of those authors, continued.

What ultimately broke the ban was journalism. I interviewed Kynard. Then I attempted to interview his long-time assistant and fellow researcher Micah Kieffer, who still worked at the USGS Conte Lab. Kieffer was not allowed to speak with me. In fact, that spring he was unceremoniously taken off sturgeon research altogether, and sent upriver to work on studies of trout—far from his area of expertise. Ultimately, I was able to get Barnaby Watten, Branch Chief at Conte Lab on the record. Not surprisingly, he could provide no clear reason why USGS was recalling and withholding Kynard and Kieffer’s Chapters 1 and 3. After that I tracked down the USGS editor, who it turned out, had no experience in shortnose sturgeon biology. It all went into my developing story for the Daily Hampshire Gazette.

But what ultimately broke the embargo was my chat with an aide to Congressman John Olver—noting to him that a group of federal and university researchers had all signed a letter to his boss, decrying the silencing of federal and university research. In short, they claimed censorship by USGS. Free speech protections, university science and the public’s right to know were being thwarted by a federal agency. Once this was brought to the attention of John Olver’s office I was quickly informed that Dr. Olver, a former UMass professor, fully intended to “look into the matter.”

The next day I brought that bit of information back to Barnaby Watten at USGS, asking for a reaction. This was a Friday. And, with just that bit of inquiry on behalf of the public’s right to know, the federal embargo on the government and university science contained in Life History and Behaviour of Connecticut River Shortnose and Other Sturgeons, quickly evaporated. By the weekend, Dr. Kynard was signing and delivering copies of a book that was the product of his nearly 20 years of federal sturgeon research. My Gazette article appeared sometime the following week.

What made it so creepy—the recall and ban, was that it was coming on the heels of the beginning of the relicensing process for the Turners Falls Dam and Turners Falls Power Canal, and the giant Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, 7 miles upriver. The corporate owners of that spawning-crippling “river regulation” lived right nearby. The land USGS Conte Lab sat on was owned by the power company. Hard not to contemplate a corporate connection.

Anyway, that fall, 2012, I began taking part as a participating stakeholder and member of the Fish and Aquatics Studies Team in the Federal Energy Regulatory Relicensing process for those facilities. I had a lot of science and writing experience pertaining to fish, dam, and river issues, and also had worked for both the power company and the watershed council previously. It was a pretty thorough bit of starter knowledge that I could make use of. I knew where the bodies were buried, where culpability for the abuse and failures in habitat protection lay.

Funny thing though, when the state and federal fish agencies, assorted stakeholders and the power company, FirstLight, sat down to discuss river studies and information needed to create new river conditions in a new license, very little mention was being made of shortnose sturgeon, the sole endangered species trying to spawn right in the heart of these relicense settings.

Frustrated, as deadlines loomed for the outlines of that spring’s fish migration studies were being discussed—all largely without anyone talking “sturgeon”, I phoned Dr. Kynard. In light of the seeming “third rail” absence of discussion about needed flows for sturgeon spawning, I asked him to release permission for me to use and enter Chapters 1 and 3 into the federal record of the relicensing. Boyd complied, and I quickly put all that science into the record so it would have standing. I also intervened later that spring when some test flows into the riverbed suggested by the power company were so low that they were guaranteed to interfere with sturgeon spawning. I won a change in the spring study flows–they didn’t get to low-ball the river’s only endangered migrants that year.

Shortnose Stout: a noble public information idea that ultimately went sideways; then belly up

Still, as time went on there just seemed to be only a smattering of lip service at the company/stakeholder meeting tables involving river flows and fish studies that mentioned shortnose sturgeon. It was remarkably, eerily quiet on that count. One day over a coffee meeting where I was downloading more long-term fisheries knowledge from Dr. Kynard, I told him that I had an idea for a beer, Shortnose Stout. I promised him I would find a producer for it, to help get the word out about sturgeon flows to the public. That effort would take many more months, but when out cycling one warm day I bumped into Alden Booth, owner of The People’s Pint in Greenfield. I told him I had this great idea for a beer name and marketing concept to help create change for an amazing–and amazingly ignored fish. He came on board pretty quick.

Over the winter things began to brewing. The Pint came up with a fine label, a Shortnose sturgeon backlit by a full sturgeon moon. I came up with the text, describing both the beer and the biological plight of the sturgeon at its spawning site, the Rock Dam—while pointing the public to the science featured on Kynard’s website. This was all volunteer work for me, done in the name of giving a voice to the river and this embattled fish.

The brand I created; my text, and Dr. Kynard’s website link.

The beer debuted on St. Patrick’s Day at The People’s Pint, and created quite a buzz. Meanwhile, Alden Booth had asked me whether there wasn’t a group that could be targeted to benefit from the sale of Shortnose Stout. I told him that I really didn’t see anyone doing any worthy river protection in light of this endangered fish’s plight. Nobody had taken up that fight. There was no one that deserved either praise or reward in the sturgeon’s name. So, it was let go at that.

The following spring, despite the Endangered Species Act, the published book, the science, and a year of Shortnose Stout, no one was standing up to the sturgeon miseries STILL occurring at the Rock Dam spawning site in the midst of federal negotiations. There was no action, nothing stated from Mass. Fish and Wildlife, US Fish and Wildlife Service, or National Marine Fisheries about stepping in at this critical time, and no USGS work to track spawning success at Rock Dam.

I did learn from The Pint’s Booth that the popular stout was going to be brewed again in March. But where I again would’ve noted that none were worthy of having stood up for sturgeon, I was informed that the Connecticut River Watershed Council was stepping up to collect funds in the name of the Shortnose sturgeon. With that I simply declined the invitation to be at that spring’s St. Patrick’s Day debut of a new batch of Shortnose Stout. Dr. Kynard did attend, and on the invitee list was also Dr. Andy Fisk, newly arrived director of the Connecticut River Watershed Council–happy to step in front of a camera.

Fisk had recently been pictured in The Greenfield Recorder, holding a bottle of Shortnose Stout on a bridge above the Connecticut. Any self-respecting shortnose sturgeon would tell you that the only site worthy of getting a photograph taken for your hard, hard work protecting this species would have required you to pose at the Rock Dam–the grimly embattled site that remains this river’s ugliest, most pointedly-ignored and undefended critical biological habitat on the entire river. The Watershed Council collected the profits and accolades in the name of the shortnose, while the actual fish remained undefended and under siege for yet another spawning season at Rock Dam. It’s great PR associating with an endangered species though.

I believe that was the final year Shortnose Stout was brewed. It was a shame such an opportunity for action was squandered. The miseries for this river’s federal and state endangered shortnose sturgeon remain today exactly as they were nearly a decade back, when a federal agency quickly stepped in and placed an embargo on a book written by researchers doing public research in the public’s interest, conducted at their own federal facilities.

The watershed council has since changed its name to “conservancy,” but in all its 69 years has never brought on board any legal staff, or adopted a mission to investigate, enforce, and prosecute—the basic things necessary to lay claim to protecting a river and endangered species.

The Connecticut River Shortnose sturgeon will arrive back at its ancient Rock Dam spawning site in just five weeks. There the riverbanks have been collapsing and failing, oozing a grim orange puss that feeds directly into their cobbled spawning pool home. The Rock Dam’s critical habitat becomes more debased, embattled and ignored with each passing season. Year after year, decade upon decade, there is no more disgraceful biological habitat—on this river, at the heart of the Connecticut River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, on the doorstep of the USGS Conte Lab, just across the river from Greenfield, home to the Connecticut River Conservancy, than the ancient Rock Dam pool on New England’s Great River.


The Connecticut River’s Rock Dam spawning pool today. Shortnose sturgeon will be returning to this grim and undefended spawning habitat 5 weeks from today.

In the end, nobody walked the walk. No one stepped up; no one deserved to profit from the sale of a beer named to honor and protect a river and a magnificent and embattled ancient fish.

Here in Massachusetts on the Connecticut River during a critical and endless FERC relicensing process the only apparent player playing for keeps is FirstLight Power–the Canadian-owned, Delaware-registered, recently-arrived operators of these river-crippling facilities. Their shareholders are delighted, I’m sure.

What will our grandchildren have to say about what we failed to do here?.

(**NOTE: for further information related to this story listen to the following podcast with Host Monte Belmonte from WRSI, The River. https://wrsi.com/monte/saving-rock-dam-from-damnation/

CONNECTICUT RIVER IMPEACHMENT DAY

Posted by on 15 Feb 2021 | Tagged as: Clean Water Act, Connecticut River, Connecticut River ecosystem, conservancy, critical habitat, defense, Endangered Species Act, EPA, ESA, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federally-endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon, FERC, FirstLight, impeachment, IS IT CLEAN?, Monte Belmonte, Northfield Mountain, podcast, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, The River, Turners Falls, Uncategorized, water lab, WRSI

CONNECTICUT RIVER IMPEACHMENT DAY: FEB.13,2021
Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The Connecticut River and the effluent entering it at the Rock Dam in Turners Falls on February 13, 2021. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

Rock Dam. Ancient fishing place at Peskeomscutt. Critical habitat, gathering and spawning place for the Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon–federally endangered fish with genetics as old as the ancient basalt that defines their habitat. Rock Dam, ancient cultural site where the riverbanks fail in yards-wide gashes, bleeding an oozy orange puss that flows in a constant ribbon into the age-old riverbed there.

(FOR A PODCAST< related to this post go to: https://wrsi.com/monte/saving-rock-dam-from-damnation/. It is from WRSI/The River radio, with host Monte Belmonte)

This is how ecosystems die, how a planet dies, bit by little bit–day after day. Sixteen months ago I submitted documents and pictures of this degradation to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. All parties, stakeholders, and federal and state fisheries agencies were apprised of my FERC report and intervention. All have long staked claims as this great river’s protectors.

Ever-so-slowly FERC responded to my report of critical habitat degradation by absurdly requiring FirstLight do its own investigation of their bank failures and discharge running to the only documented natural spawning site of the only federally endangered migratory fish in the river. FirstLight, in representing itself, found itself exonerated of responsibility. Blame for the constant red tide was somehow placed at the feet of the public.

Day by day, by day, by day, by day–this is how a river rots, while so many sit on the sidelines. Day by day, in the midst of an endless legal relicensing process addressing environmental conditions in New England’s River, the assault continues, the banks fail–the orange sludge enters. A simple act of courage would have sufficed: just scoop some bank sludge, have it analyzed. Take a beaker’s worth of water to your lab; run a test.

If you brag about your water quality lab and–yet week after week, month upon month, season after season, ignore the grim juice invading critical river habitat right on your Greenfield doorstep, you are a failed entity. You have no valid claim as a solution, you are this river’s problem. If riverbanks fail in the most critical reach of the main stem river in the midst of relicensing on your watch and you don’t sue, your erosion committee is just window dressing.

Today two conservancies lay claim to championing New England’s Great River. But there is no conservancy in evidence here–no rescue, no enforcement, no prosecution. There’s been no sampling, even as little fish promo rescues were videoed in the muck-filled power canal just 100 yards away. Upstream in the actual riverbed, more happy-time swimming podcasts were filmed, while not a single lens was pointed at the Rock Dam pool’s grim debasement, a quarter mile distant. Sixteen months, and a deafening silence here–while congratulatory broadcasts are run celebrating how the Connecticut was cleaned-up and saved… Really. Really? Cleaned up, saved???


The Rock Dam spawning pool, the most critically endangered habitat on the entire Connecticut River. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

Here, at the most critical habitat in the entire river ecosystem, it might as well be 1940. It appears the Clean Water Act applies only to other rivers; the Endangered Species Act–that’s a law for somewhere else. To protect the life force of a river requires diving in like an ER doctor, protecting the core at all costs. Any ancillary PR busy work around the tributary edges can happen sometime down the road. The victim must be stabilized, first, lest there’s nothing left to save.

If you lay claim to a river, you have a duty to preserve, protect and defend. Not when its easy; not just where it won’t ruffle any feathers. Today, there is no defense for what is here, on this river–central artery of a fish and wildlife refuge. Truth is, there is NO DEFENSE ON THE CONNECTICUT RIVER, no entity posting-up against corporate abuse. None exercising the courage or integrity to prosecute a real defense.

Conservancy here, appears to equate with comfort zone. Its a safe place, in a refuge where the by-word seems to be simply–go along to get along. Podcasts are no substitute for intervention and prosecution; filing endless pages of testimony is merely more talking-the-talk.

Enforcement is what’s been missing on New England’s river these last 70 years. In its absence the life force of an ecosystem has teetered on the edge of viability for generations in the Connecticut’s critical reaches at Turners Falls and Northfield Mountain. Today the grim faltering can be easily witnessed daily at the Rock Dam in Turners Falls, where hour upon hour, day after day, critical habitat is bathed in failure; a great river remains undefended.

On other Northeast rivers–ones smaller, and with much younger organizations formed for their defense, things are handled differently, directly. They take defense as an obligation; they employ staff lawyers, investigate, and take action. Instead of remaining silent and sidelined for generations while tethered to the cash handouts of the corporate chow-line–when they witness crimes they take the bastards to court.

Here, with no watchdog to fear, they are playing for keeps.

END NOTE: generations of Canadian shareholders at PSP Investments, FirstLight’s parent owner, are very much looking forward to enjoying the profits from a river and ecosystem shredded by the daily net-loss operation of Northfield Mountain. What will our great grandkids think of what we failed to do here?

A Connecticut River return to the bad old days?

Posted by on 18 Oct 2020 | Tagged as: American shad, Cabot Woods, Clean Water Act, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Conservancy, Connecticut River riverbank failure, Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Endangered Species Act, Eversource, Farmington River, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federally-endangered shortnose sturgeon, FirstLight, FirstLight Power, Greenfield Community College, Northeast Utilities, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, pumped storage, Relicensing, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, Society of Environmental Journalists, Source to Sea Cleanup, The Recorder, The Revelator, Turners Falls, Turners Falls dam, Turners Falls power canal, Uncategorized, US Geological Survey's Conte Fish Lab, Vermont Digger, Vernon Dam Fishway

The riverbanks at Rock Dam
Photo
Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

Note: the following piece appeared recently in VTDigger, www.vtdigger.org, https://vtdigger.org/2020/10/18/karl-meyer-a-connecticut-river-return-to-the-bad-old-days/ and in the The Recorder, www.recorder.com, (no story link posted)

                        A Connecticut River return to the bad old days?

Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer All rights reserved

On September 1st, FirstLight Power petitioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for a 3rd delay in submitting final license applications to run Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station and their Turners Falls hydro sites in Massachusetts. In a process now in its 9th year, the Canadian-owned company wants 4 more months to restudy NMPS’s water release impacts on endangered tiger beetles 30 miles downstream. It was bad news capping a dismal year for a Connecticut River that’s not seen any semblance of natural flows in the Bay State for half a century.

Despite recent on-air, print and social media stories of cleanup heroism, secret swimming holes, baby lamprey rescue and adult lamprey barbecues, our river seems headed back toward its time as “the nation’s best landscaped sewer.”

In August hundreds of thousands of gallons of raw sewage overflows enter its main stem, fouling it from Springfield to Middletown CT. In June, for the second time in a year, toxic PFAS entered waterways at Bradley Airport triggering fish consumption warnings and menacing water supplies on the Farmington all the way to its meeting with the Connecticut. A year ago–almost exactly 19 years after a factory spill killed thousands of North River fish, that grizzly Colrain kill was replicated when sulfuric acid again flowed from that site into that same tributary. 

In Vermont this year structural problems at Vernon Dam likely led to the big downturn in American shad reaching central New England. At Vernon this spring structural problems at that fishway likely led to the big downturn in American shad passing upstream there to central New England. The partial blockage might have been caught–and repaired, had two students downriver at Greenfield Community College fulfilled their weekly fish counting obligations. Important tallying, via downloaded video, just didn’t happen–leaving the problem at Vernon Dam undetected for a full migration season.

Meanwhile in Turners Falls riverbanks were collapsing—some oozing grim puss that’s leaching to the most endangered habitat in the ecosystem. The Rock Dam is an in-river ledge that’s provided refuge to federally endangered shortnose sturgeon for centuries. It’s their sole documented natural spawning site. Pink-orange slurry has been flushing from the banks there for a year–running into the river’s cobble bed where early life stage sturgeon shelter and develop.

A red slurry enters the Connecticut at the Rock Dam
Photo
Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

Visitors to the river at Rock Dam off “Migratory Way” in Cabot Woods will see a 30 foot hemlock and saplings being eaten by a sinkhole now big enough for a Mini-Cooper. Banks there slump to a series of nasty, yards-wide, gashes—one with a dumped tire in its center. Slime squeezing from them sloughs in weeping riverlets that flow the final few yards to the river’s sturgeon nursery as a rusty precipitate of oxidizing iron, manganese and other unknown agents. In a drought year, the adjacent muck-choked canal is clearly the destabilizing water source.

Upriver failing FirstLight banks are threatening Millers Falls Road and houses on a buff there. Pipe failure is said to be a culprit. The town made expensive repairs, dumping rubble on that hillside at a sharp river curve called The Narrows. Failures at such nearby sites might merit closer examination. The Narrows is where current pushes against the outer riverbanks–a classic place for surging water to create erosional impact. Northfield Mountain creates big suck-and-surge cycles just 4 miles upstream–sending down powerful pulses that cause daily 3 foot “tides” at Turners Falls Dam. Some can reach 9 feet.

NMPS was completed in 1972 by Northeast Utilities. Rebranded as Eversource and now expanding into natural gas, they are still New England’s grid monopoly and perennial major sponsor of the Source to Sea Cleanup. NMPS is a now 48 year-old FirstLight holding, but still sending its surges down the Narrows to that dam. There, they get shunted into the power canal, ultimately exerting pressure against its massively muck-choked outer bank–adjacent and just 400 feet from those dissolving banks at Rock Dam. Ironically, any flow the canal can’t swallow gets flushed over the dam in channel-ramping surges to the starved, oft-empty riverbed below. That parch-and-flood cycle further impacts Rock Dam’s shores; then heads to endangered Puritan tiger beetle habitat 30 miles away.

The muck-choked outer bank of the drawn-down Turner Falls power canal on Sept. 14, 2020 Photo Copyright © 2020 by Karl Meyer

The US Geological Survey’s Conte Anadromous Fish Research Center sits 250 yards from Rock Dam. Shortnose sturgeon and their critical Rock Dam pool were extensively studied by their researchers there for decades. Now debased and failing, it is ignored. What about the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act? That lab sits on a bank opposite Greenfield, home to the 68 year-old, recently-rebranded Connecticut River Conservancy. Why isn’t CRC testing that Rock Dam slurry at their water lab? Have they sent any slime samples out for analysis? Where’s their Streambank Erosion Committee? Why would a federal lab abandon the long-term endangered species research site at its door?

As self-described champions of “Science for a Changing World” and “Healthy habitats,” neither has steered a reporter or video crew to that elephant in the room. Perhaps it’s their admission of powerlessness. CRC, dependent on various federal and state fish and environmental agencies for grant monies won’t likely be calling out their failures anytime soon. They have no enforcement mandate and employ no staff lawyers. Thus they never challenge the big dogs, and power companies know it.

If a river could talk I think it would say cleanups look nice, but they won’t save rivers. That requires an unencumbered 21st century organization—one with lawyers and an enforcement mandate corporations can’t ignore.

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