NO DEAL: amid public opposition FirstLight’s secret Northfield Mountain settlement plans stumble.

Failing in December to secure a secrecy-shrouded agreement, foreign-owned FL petitions FERC again for what’s now an open-ended “Delay of Action/Extension of Time” request. Thus the opportunity for critical public testimony in FL’s Federal Energy Regulatory relicense bid for Northfield remains WIDE OPEN. (**SEE simple FERC filing instructions at end of post)

As scores of public testimony to end Northfield Mountain’s devastation has poured into the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission of late, secret license deals with federal and state fish and agencies here in Massachusetts continue to elude FirstLight Power. The MA Division of Fish & Wildlife, US Fish & Wildlife, MA DEP and the National Marine Fisheries Service–responsible to the public for protecting the Connecticut’s migratory and resident fish, flows, and water quality under established law, are legally empowered with “conditioning authority” to end the half century of slaughter wrought by Northfield’s deadly suctioning. They currently hold the keys to determining if the Commonwealth hosts New England’s river-reversing, ecosystem grim reaper for more decades to come.

Democracy for coming generations means not leaving our river in the hands of a private corporation for ANOTHER half century.

FirstLight filed their latest FERC delay bid on January 4, 2022, the same day as Ethel White of Easthampton filed her FERC testimony stating, “I write concerning the Northfield, MA hydroelectric plant application for recertification. I strongly request that recertification be denied,” Meanwhile, FirstLight, that same day filed a “Continued Request to Defer Issuance of Notice of Acceptance / Ready for Environmental Analysis” with FERC for their Delaware tax-sheltered MA facilities here. Yet, with this latest delay request it appears they’ve discovered their venture capital plans for the Connecticut River are not being swallowed whole here in New England.

Parent-owned by Canadian venture capital giant PSP Investments, FirstLight has once again punted on deadlines in what has now become a decade long slog to continue the massive predation of the region’s key ecosystem artery, after a full half century. In its own January 4, 2022 filing FirstLight again begged FERC for relief of its own previously promised deadlines: “FirstLight requests that the Commission continue to defer issuance of the REA Notice until after January 31, 2022, to allow the parties to focus on the agreement in principle. If the parties are able to reach an agreement in principle by that time, they will then request that the Commission further defer issuance of the REA Notice to allow for negotiation of a fully developed, binding settlement agreement that the parties would submit to the Commission as an offer of settlement pursuant to 18 C.F.R. § 385.602.” An “REA” is FERC-speak for “ready for environmental analysis.”

In its Final License Application FirstLight’s big bid as a concession for the massive sucking fish kill annually at Northfield was a temporary 1,000 foot net, with ¾ inch mesh, to be deployed from upstream, and angled to near its suction tunnels to deflect some of the 24 species of adult fish from its giant, river-reversing vortex. That is literally a year round open door to the obliteration of 100s of millions of eggs and tiny young of developing migratory American shad and the two dozen resident and migrant species of the river—but in particular the key spawning, rearing and out-migrating months between late May and mid-October…

Importantly in that regard, the window for DEMOCRACY on our Connecticut River remains wide open for citizen to go on the public with FERC, and as well in the region’s media. Of late, literally scores of citizens have done just that, in FERC testimony that Northfield’s devastation must end and no new license be offered to FirstLight.

Below is Ethel White’s full January 4th on-the-record testimony, from the same day FL requested more FERC time for their venture capital plans for New England’s Great River, its life, and the future generations who are all entitled to a living ecosystem.

* * But first, here’s how you can stand up, on-the-record, in this critical time for the Connecticut River’s future:

GO TO: www.ferc.gov; then to “Documents and Filings”; then click on the “Quick Links” tab for FERC Online on the right; and then to “eComment” on the page that opens. Follow directions for “Hydroelectric License/Re-license Proceedings (P – Project Number),” and BE SURE TO use Northfield’s FERC project number, P-2485, to enter your comments.

Document Accession #: 20220104-5000 Filed Date: 01/04/2022
Ethel S. White, Easthampton, MA.

I write concerning the Northfield, MA hydroelectric plant application for recertification. I strongly request that recertification be denied. Your commission’s decisions are key to how we deal with climate change. The vast majority of Americans believe that climate change is one of the top issues of today, if not THE top issue. We are on the brink of losing our planet’s ability to sustain human life, and large hydroelectric plants are not beneficial to rivers, aquatic life, or human existence. The Connecticut River is a vital artery in New England, and losing it to environmental degradation would be a tragedy. I hope the Commission will regulate this particular energy source in the proper way, by closing it down.
Sincerely, Ethel S. White

* * Agency heads and personnel representing the public trust:

wendi_weber@fws.gov, Director Region 5 US Fish & Wildlife Service; andrew.tittler@sol.doi.gov, lead council at the table for USFWS; melissa_grader@fws.gov, at the table for our migratory fish; julie.crocker@noaa.gov, National Marine Fisheries Service Endangered Fish Recovery Branch Chief (endangered sturgeon); william.mcdavitt@noaa.gov, at the table for our migratory fish; mark.tisa@state.ma.us, Director of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, jesse.leddick@state.ma.us, Chief of Regulatory Review MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife.