Police action threatened at US Fish & Wildlife HQ as constituents tried to deliver letters on Tuesday, November 30, 2021

A cold, socially-distanced public welcome at USFWS Headquaters in Hadley for visiting citizens as security guard reaches to phone police. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

SEE also, this Recorder article by Chris Larabee, here also featured in the Gazette: https://www.gazettenet.com/Two-make-20-mile-hike-to-protest-FirstLight-s-potential-relicensing-43803954

HADLEY MA. A security guard at Hadley’s US Fish and Wildlife Headquarters threatened to call police on Karl Meyer of Greenfield and Dave Dersham of Northampton and a handful of their supporters after completing a 20 mile protest walk to the facility at around 4 pm Tuesday. The two were interviewed by the Recorder and WWLP TV Channel 22 News along the route. Their trek from Greenfield to Hadley was made to call attention to a final, closed-door license “settlement” negotiation scheduled by Canada-owned FirstLight with the US Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries, and MA Division of Fish and Wildlife for Thursday, December 2nd. FirstLight wants the agencies to sign-off on a final deal in the 9 year-old Federal Energy Regulatory Commission process relicensing the massive suctioning of the Connecticut River at their 49 year old Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station.

Banner on federal relicensing of Northfield Mountain displayed at USFWS HQ. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

The duo and three other citizens including a 14 year-old and an infant, were quickly denied entrance during regular business hours as they attempted to deliver notes and letters to USFWS Regional Director Wendi Weber. A security guard sitting behind a front lobby window tersely told them their letters, in an open manila envelope, would not be accepted at the public HQ. When they made further inquiry the guard became defensive, without offering alternatives, and then escalated the situation by demanding no picture taking was allowed and they leave the lobby or “I will call the police.” Asking why, the guard offered no further discussion, instead repeating the police threat and then dialing a phone where visitors heard her request that Hadley police cruiser be dispatched.

One of the messages constituents wanted to convey to USFWS Director Wendi Weber. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

At that point the visitors left the lobby with their letters, and continued their discussions in front of the unwelcoming Headquarters building. The group, also supported earlier in the day by a dozen protesters who’d met the two walkers on the Sunderland Bridge, were completing trip by collecting handwritten messages for Weber from the public. All were being sent to highlight the obliteration the 100’s of millions of eggs and young-of-the year migratory and resident fish killed by Northfield giant turbines annually. They are asking USFWS representatives to deny FirstLight’s license proposal of placing a temporary “barrier” net, with ¾ inch mesh, in front of NMPS for a few months each year. They say FL’s “safety net” will be patently ineffectual in preventing the long-standing annual carnage to Connecticut River fish populations in the heart of the ecosystem and S.O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge.

Supporters standing, post-ejection, in front of USFWS Headquarter. Photo Copyright © 2021 by Karl Meyer

After several more minutes standing in the cold and talking in front of the headquarters Anne Sittauer, a USFWS Refuge Supervisor, was sent outside to speak to the group, now totaling eight. Sittauer stated the Region 5 Director was busy, but she would accept the letters on Weber’s behalf, giving assurances they’d reach her. No squad car ever arrived and no arrests took place among the peaceful visitors, after being threatened, denied entrance and receiving a patently-shabby un welcome at the facility. Surely it was an eye-opening public interaction for the teenager, the grandmother, and the handful of other citizens asking federal representatives to honor their public trust by protecting the public’s fish—fish being annually obliterated for the last 49 years in the heart of today’s S.O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge—one of only two of 568 national refuge’s with “fish” specifically in its title.