Copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.

The Connecticut River banks above the Rock Dam pool–the only documented natural spawning site in the entire ecosystem for the federally endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, are collapsing and discharging polluting silt and what has been noted as a red, oxidizing leachate of manganese which is now entering the fragile habitat . Several sink holes, 4 and 5 feet deep have also begun showing up in the last three years atop the eroded trails leading to this ancient fishing area. They are inhabited by still-living, sunken hemlock trees. In other places, large trees are toppling.

These site are subject to the conditions in the current Federal Energy Regulatory Commission licenses P-1889, and P-2485, governing the operations of the Turners Falls Dam/Power Canal/Cabot Station, and the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project. Both of these projects are currently the subject of FERC relicensing. They fall under the protections of the Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.

NOTE: the Rock Dam pool and the pollution entry site are pictured in several photos. A tape measure draped across the red chair in these photos measures 5-feet across, for some perspective.

The apparent eroding water source for these collapsed banks is the outer curve of the ballooning Turners Falls power canal, just 200 feet away, at this site just few hundred yards north of the Silvio O. Conte Anadromous Fish Research Center. The last time the canal was fully mucked out and examined at this site was 2009. Note the photos from that year of heavy machinery in the canal.

Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.

The rate of collapse of these banks has increased dramatically this year, with two area gashes of 8 feet, and 25 feet across, falling away into a widening gully that feeds this silty pollution directly into the cobble, rubble, and sands that are the critical spawning and nursery habitat of the shortnose sturgeon, this river system’s only federally-endangered migratory fish. The maintenance of these banks has long been the responsibility of FirstLight Power, operators of the Turners Falls Dam, power canal, and of the violently disruptive peaking operations of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, 9 miles upstream.

Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.

In the photo below are those same canal banks filled with thousands of cubic yards of muck, left un-shoveled and uninvestigated, where they bow out, adjacent to the collapsing banks above the Rock Dam site. It was taken during this year’s canal draw-down in the first week of October 2019. That muck, adjacent to those leaching/collapsing banks, was again not removed this year. That hasn’t occurred in a decade, since 2009.
Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.


Photo copyright © 2019, by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.