April 2019

Monthly Archive

Why no FISH?, STILL???

Posted by on 30 Apr 2019 | Tagged as: American shad, Atlantic salmon, Bellows Falls Fishway, blueback herring, Connecticut River, Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission, Connecticut River migratory fisheries restoration, Connecticut River Watershed Council, CRASC, Daily Hampshire Gazette, Dr. Boyd Kynard, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, federal trust fish, FERC, FirstLight, Gary Sanderson, Greenfield Recorder, Holyoke Fish Lift, MA Division of Fish and Wildlife, Montague Reporter, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, Northfield Mountain, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Station, Public Law 98-138, Rock Dam, shad, shortnose sturgeon, The Greenfield Recorder, The Recorder, Turners Falls, Turners Falls power canal, Uncategorized, US Fish & Wildlife Service, US Geological Survey's Conte Fish Lab, Vernon Dam Fishway

The disastrously-emptied Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Reservoir, June 27, 2010. (CLICK, then Click several times more for FULLEST VIEW) Copyright © 2019 by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.

WHY no FISH…
All photos and text Copyright © 2019 by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved.

By clicking on the blue link WHY no FISH… above, and then clicking it again on the following page, you will open an old PowerPoint presentation that I gave to the Pioneer Valley Chapter of Trout Unlimited in Holyoke in December 2010. It will take several minutes to load, but is then largely self-explanatory, with text available below photos, or by clicking the text tab.

On April 30, 2010 I embarked on a journey to the mouth of the Connecticut River by bicycle, to document the grim crippling of the river and its shad runs due to the lack of enforcement and engagement of fisheries agencies and river organizations. At the time, they were all still cheerleaders for a failed salmon program, ignoring the stark facts of the impacts of the Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project on American shad and federally endangered shortnose sturgeon.

At the time I was doing part-time work at the Connecticut River Watershed Council, but quit out of frustration and disappointment just a few months after.

Notably, just a year later, the US Fish & Wildlife Service cancelled its long-failed salmon hatchery and “restoration” program on the Connecticut. A year after that, the river conversation became about the impacts of flows in the Dead Reach of the Connecticut, and Dr. Boyd Kynard’s groundbreaking book focusing on federally endangered shortnose sturgeon at the Rock Dam was released–though only following an unconscionable 3-month embargo of his research data by the US Geological Service.

Nearly a decade later, Northfield Mountain remains the Connecticut River ecosystem’s deadliest machine, directly impacting riverine life and migratory fish abundance in three states.

The Connecticut River now has TWO “conservancies”, but not a single NGO that makes any claims for ENFORCEMENT being a chief (or really ANY) component of their mandate. And ENFORCEMENT is a requisite for any true ecosystem restoration and river protection outfit that means to carry out its mission. This is a four-state ecosystem without a legal team. The Connecticut remains a river unprotected.

Precise, Repeatable Flow Measurements Required in FERC Licensing Studies

Posted by on 19 Apr 2019 | Tagged as: 5-year FERC licensing process, American shad, bascule gates, By Pass Reach, Connecticut River, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FERC licensing process, FirstLight, Northfield Mountain Pumped Storage Project, repeatable metric, Revised Study Plan, Secretary Kimberly Bose, staff gauges, Station 1, Turners Falls, Turners Falls dam


Turners Falls Dam with Spill on the Right Emanating from Two Bascule Gates. Photo Copyright © 2019 by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved. CLICK, then CLICK again.

(NOTE: the following Stakeholder Comments were accepted by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on April 18, 2019)

Karl Meyer, M.S. Environmental Science
Greenfield, MA, 01301 April 18,2019

The Honorable Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
88 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20426

RE: P-1889 and P-2485, Stakeholder Comments on Study 3.3.19, Evaluate Use of an Ultrasound Array to Facilitate Upstream Movement to Turners Falls Dam by Avoiding the Cabot Tailrace; and the Study Addendum Plan to extend the results of 3.3.19, presented by FirstLight at the March 29, 2019 meeting at Northfield.

Dear Secretary Bose,

I have been a participating Stakeholder in the FERC ILP relicensing proceedings for P-1889 and P-2485 since 2012. I serve on the Fish and Aquatics Studies Team for both projects and have been in attendance with fellow Stakeholders at all relevant FERC ILP meetings and consultations since that time.

On March 29, 2019, FirstLight held a meeting with federal and state agencies and stakeholders to present their Study Plan Addendum to continue investigations under Study 3.3.19. The new 2019 Study treatments will again involve manipulating flows from the Turners Falls Dam and Station 1 to understand the necessary conditions for bringing American shad through the By Pass and up to the TF Dam.

Need: the need for 3.3.19 has already been demonstrated; and the necessity of gaining further information has become obvious—results have shown that shad move through the By Pass directly to the dam when signaling flows are present. Thus, FL intends to do a new series of test flows through the By Pass Reach beginning in May, involving various flow treatments implemented at the TF Dam bascule gates, and through Station 1.

Need for Additional Information: any Study that informs decisions on License Conditions needs to be repeatable, with parameters that are verifiable. During the March 29, 2019 meeting FL Manager Doug Bennett stated that gauging flow releases at Turners Falls Dam was rather imprecise, involving guesswork and incremental, 1-foot adjustments to the Bascule Gates at TF Dam. This situation adds too much imprecision to a study meant to lead to repeatable flow conditions and an understanding of how shad respond to stepped flows.

Further Information Needed: Without precision or benchmarks to accurately gauge the flows entering the By Pass, it will be impossible to understand the precise settings impacting the movements of shad toward TF Dam as releases are made at the Bascules and through the Station 1 Canal Extension.

Recommendation: The need for an accurate and repeatable metric for testing and implementing flow conditions is obvious. It is a necessity for the future judicious sharing of water through these Projects.

This demonstrated necessity can be accomplished quickly, simply, elegantly, and with little expense for Study 3.3.19, with the installation of Staff Gauges at Turners Falls Dam and
Station 1.

At Turners Falls Dam, Staff Gauges can be braced and installed on the Support Stays between Bascule 1 and Bascule 2, extending upward from the base of the dam. A gauge will also be needed on the upstream side of the dam. There may yet be a gauge near the Old Red Bridge abutment just upstream of TF Dam, but this may need updating or replacement.

At Station 1, Staff Gauges can be installed at the outflow tunnels, and a gauge just inside the Station 1 Canal Extension at the defunct rail crossing would be sufficient.

(NOTE: if spring conditions do not allow for installation of hardware or permanent staff gauges for the upcoming study, painted benchmarks can easily suffice for this season in order to gain the required information.)

Thank you.

Sincerely,
Karl Meyer, M.S.

Visit the Rock Dam: endangered sturgeon sanctuary

Posted by on 05 Apr 2019 | Tagged as: Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon, Dr. Boyd Kynard, endangerd shortnose sturgeon, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, FERC, FirstLight, Holyoke Dam, Holyoke Fish Lift, Holyoke Gas & Electric, Northfield Mountain, Relicensing, Rock Dam, Rock Dam Pool, shad, shad larvae, shortnose sturgeon, Turners Falls, Turners Falls dam


Photo Copyright © 2019 by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved. (Click, then click twice more to enlarge).

On Sunday, April 14; 10:30 a.m. in Turners Falls you can join sturgeon expert Dr. Boyd Kynard and myself for a short hike to an exceptional and beleaguered aquatic refuge on the Connecticut River. This is a fragile sanctuary that endangered Connecticut River shortnose sturgeon and other species have used as a spawning and rearing refuge for thousands of years.

Today, industrial depredations that result in dribble-and-surge, see-saw flows in the riverbed continually threaten the spawning success of the only federal- and state- endangered migratory fish in this ecosystem. Another looming threat are pods of lumbering rafts, rafters and kayakers with nascent plans to repeatedly surf the single and brief rapid here–landing in fragile habitat, and dragging boats upstream through wetlands and cobbles for endless joy rides.

Photo Copyright © 2019 by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved. (Click, then click twice more to enlarge).

Dr. Kynard recounts the shortnose sturgeon’s complex biology centered on this site and his results from decades of sturgeon research at the Rock Dam pool. Meyer gives an overview of this embattled river reach, including geology and human and industrial history. Free.

No pre-registration necessary. Meet at public lot off G Street in Turners Falls, near USGS Conte Fish Lab sign. Includes brief, steep, rugged terrain; not handicapped accessible. Walk best suited for ages 10 and above. Heavy rain cancels.

ALSO of note on the river, Holyoke Gas & Electric was scheduled to start running the fish lifts at South Hadley Falls on April 1st to begin passing this year’s migration of sturgeon, shad, lamprey and herring. As usual, the lifts were not readied in time, and the strongest, most eager migrants are treading water for a full week without upstream access. They are said to begin lifting fish next week, but flows have now come up, which may be an excuse for further delay.

Photo Copyright © 2019 by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved. (Click, then click twice more to enlarge).

Meanwhile, as the federal relicensing process for Northfield Moutain and Turners Falls embarks on it SEVENTH year, both FERC and FirstLight appear in no hurry to see the process conclude. Thus, a beleaguered ecosystem and embattled fish and habitats remain starved of their legally required protections.

Photo Copyright © 2019 by Karl Meyer. All Rights Reserved. (Click; then click twice more to enlarge).